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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My local JD dealer says they don't recommend putting a FEL on anything smaller than a 1025R. He's quoted me a 1025R with the JD D160XLV FEL. I've seen 1023E's with a FEL. I know the 1023E is less HP than the 1025R (at slightly less cost - about $1800). I'm also wanting a finishing mower and a box blade. I've got about 5 acres to attend to - nothing extreme - mowing, mulching leaves, moving dirt, mulch, and gravel around. Any strong opinions for one model over the other? Is the 1025R worth the extra cost? Will the 1023E perform okay with the FEL?
 

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Welcome to GTT. I would think a 1023E would be fine for your applications. 1025R has a couple more HP and some additional creature comforts. I would steer clear of the D120 FEL though. I believe that is the FEL that is not quick remove/attach. The H120 FEL is what you want.
 

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Welcome to GTT. I would think a 1023E would be fine for your applications. 1025R has a couple more HP and some additional creature comforts. I would steer clear of the D120 FEL though. I believe that is the FEL that is not quick remove/attach. The H120 FEL is what you want.
I’ll second this. The D120 loader is not a quick attach. Get the H120 or the 120R loader and you also want the quick change bucket, not the pin on.


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I’ll second this. The D120 loader is not a quick attach. Get the H120 or the 120R loader and you also want the quick change bucket, not the pin on.

I’m curious as to why the dealer recommended not putting a FEL on a 1023e. They use the same loaders as the 1025.

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I’ll second this. The D120 loader is not a quick attach. Get the H120 or the 120R loader and you also want the quick change bucket, not the pin on.


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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Welcome to GTT. I would think a 1023E would be fine for your applications. 1025R has a couple more HP and some additional creature comforts. I would steer clear of the D120 FEL though. I believe that is the FEL that is not quick remove/attach. The H120 FEL is what you want.
The quote I have is for the D160XLV FEL, not the D120 that everyone is advising me to avoid. Does that change anything? I doubt that I would want to take it off much - if ever.

Also, something I didn't mention is that I need to do a fair amount of leveling with the box blade and I understand the 1025R has 3-point position control and the 1025E does not. My old Ford 8N doesn't have any kind of automatic position control, requiring me to continuously fool with the position level (usually unsuccessfully!). I'm guessing the 1025R's position control ability would be useful to me - if I'm understanding how it works. Maybe someone could clarify that.
 

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My local JD dealer says they don't recommend putting a FEL on anything smaller than a 1025R. He's quoted me a 1025R with the JD D160XLV FEL. I've seen 1023E's with a FEL. I know the 1023E is less HP than the 1025R (at slightly less cost - about $1800). I'm also wanting a finishing mower and a box blade. I've got about 5 acres to attend to - nothing extreme - mowing, mulching leaves, moving dirt, mulch, and gravel around. Any strong opinions for one model over the other? Is the 1025R worth the extra cost? Will the 1023E perform okay with the FEL?
My dealer flat our refused to sell me a 1023E. He said it was underpowered and I'd be very unhappy with it. Surprised me a bit I have to admit. Not sure if he was being brutally honest about his product line, or trying to upsell me. He upsold me. ;-) :gizmo:
 

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I had a 1023E and ran my pto implements just fine (48" tiller and rotary cutter), it comes with the same FEL as the 1025R with the same hydraulic pressure, sounds like for whatever reason he does not want to sell you a 1023.
Maybe he should be a real salesman and try this approach:
All things considered for an extra $1800+/- you will get more with the 1025R, several creature comforts like premium seat, tilt steering, cruise control, rubber floor mat, as well as 20% more pto horse power. On top of that you will also get the position control 3 point. :good2:
 

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My local JD dealer says they don't recommend putting a FEL on anything smaller than a 1025R. He's quoted me a 1025R with the JD D160XLV FEL. I've seen 1023E's with a FEL. I know the 1023E is less HP than the 1025R (at slightly less cost - about $1800). I'm also wanting a finishing mower and a box blade. I've got about 5 acres to attend to - nothing extreme - mowing, mulching leaves, moving dirt, mulch, and gravel around. Any strong opinions for one model over the other? Is the 1025R worth the extra cost? Will the 1023E perform okay with the FEL?
Wow... that certainly is a new upsell approach. Someone should let that guy know that the extra 1.5HP of the 1025R isn't going to do diddly for the loader. The neighbor has a 1023e with loader and MMM and he is quite happy with it. It seems to have plenty of power.

But... having said that, I would look carefully at the differences between the 1023e and 1025R. Unless you are on a very strict budget, most folks find the extra $1800 well worth it for the extra creature comforts, lighting harness, etc. provided with the 1025R - along with the position control that you mentioned.
 
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Wow... that certainly is a new upsell approach. Someone should let that guy know that the extra 1.5HP of the 1025R isn't going to do diddly for the loader. The neighbor has a 1023e with loader and MMM and he is quite happy with it. It seems to have plenty of power.

But... having said that, I would look carefully at the differences between the 1023e and 1025R. Unless you are on a very strict budget, most folks find the extra $1800 well worth it for the extra creature comforts, lighting harness, etc. provided with the 1025R - along with the position control that you mentioned.
The 1023 comes with the same wiring harness, just an FYI, although you could just look here for some other tid bits. :hide:
1023E vs. 1025R?
 

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The 1023 comes with the same wiring harness, just an FYI, although you could just look here for some other tid bits. :hide:
1023E vs. 1025R?
JD must have changed things then. The 1023e didn't used to come with the work light harness.
 
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JD must have changed things then. The 1023e didn't used to come with the work light harness.
My 2017 had the lighting harness, I do believe that was the year they started adding it though.
 
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.

I think your dealer is confused about the loader. The d160 loader, according to Deere's website, is compatible with the 3 series E tractors. (See below)

Let me just say that while you now think you will be unlikely to remove the loader very often, you will find all sorts of ways to use your tractor once you get it that you never imagined. Chances are you will be taking the loader on and off more often and you may just want to drop the bucket and use the FEL arms for other purposes, which you cant do as easily or quickly with the pin on bucket.

Also, while the D series loader is less money, they are also MUCH harder to sell down the road as most people do want the easy removable loader for very good reason. Dealers quote the 1023e and the D120 loader when in competition with other brands, especially the imports like Mahindra, etc. But that tractor combination is sold less than 5% of all the sales of 1 series tractors. Its basically a lead item to draw customers in to look at the units.

The D loader also comes with the smaller loader bucket and its a pin on model, which is far less handy to remove and use your FEL for other purposes. Also, the larger FEL bucket, which I think is 54" instead of 49" is only a $52 up charge, so its money very well spent.

As far as power, the 1023e has about 90% of the power which the 1025r has. I saw Deere's production numbers earlier this year and roughly 96% of the 1 series tractors they build and sell are the 1025R.

Personally, I looked at the 1023e and decided the additional cost was well warranted for my needs and purposes. The better seat, the 3 point controls, having the PTO output shaft RPM's shown in your gauge display when you are using the PTO is very handy to know what your implement is actually doing. The additional lights on the tractor, etc.

Check out many of the 1, 2 and 3 series tractors which are up for resale and you will find the E series is well represented with the "D" series loaders. The "E" series tractors in the 3 series and above do not have a front PTO drive option, which is a limiting factor for machines of that size. That means no front snow blowers or brooms, no Mid mount Mowers, etc. While the 1023e does have the front PTO option on the machines, the larger "E" series do not and its not available as an upgrade or enhancement, either.

I mention this because you can purchase a 3025e for just a little more than you would pay for the 1025R. The 3025e has the same engine as the 1025r and the same horse power and torque ratings. But the 3025e does not have a front PTO drive option. The 3025e has greater lifting capabilities than the 1025r because of the larger hydraulic pump. so it lifts more and lifts it faster and higher.

If you are not going to be mowing with a Mid mount mower and plan on using the front end loader for a lot of "dirt work", then the 3025e is a machine to consider as it's very close to the price point of the 1025r. But the 3025e is a much larger and heavier machine, which depending upon your needs can be a good thing or a bad thing. These are the reasons why so many people buying tractors struggle to decide which machine to purchase.

New tractor buyers tend to underestimate their needs and often buy less machine than they should. Rarely are machine sold without at least 2 or 3 additional implements and often owners add even more. I think I am up to 10 implements now, having added the 60" Frontier Landscape rake to my equipment today.

At 5 acres to maintain, you have several very good options which are pretty close in price to one another. Of course, each property is different, but you will find so many ways to use your machine to help maintain and improve your property that you will wonder how you got along with it. The horsepower and torque are important for ground engaging implements, like rototillers and discs, etc. The type of soil you have also makes a big difference. No one ever regrets having more power and torque than they need. Having less power and torque may mean it just takes you longer to complete the same tasks as compared to the higher horsepower / torque options.

There are plenty of owners of both 1023e and 1025r who are very happy with their machines. Personally, I would opt for the `120R or H120 loader for the ease of adding and dropping the bucket, etc. One of the handiest implements / attachments I own are my pallet forks. I bet I put them on and take them off at least 2 or 3 times each week for some project. The D loader requires more time and effort to switch from the bucket to the forks or grapple, etc. With the R series, it's a matter of 10 seconds to switch.

With Deere's 0% financing, every $1,000 of additional cost raises the payment $16.66 per month. Now, that wasn't a consideration in my purchase as I paid cash for my equipment, but when those who are buying new consider the additional cost of accessories, attachments and implements, keep the $16.66 per month of additional payment per $1,000 of cost in mind.

Sit on the machines and drive each and see if the seat is important to you. When spending several hours sitting there, it does matter more to people with back / hip and other joint issues. But that's just one consideration. Bottom line, you will likely be very happy with either. D160Loader


  • Compatible with the 3032E and 3038E
  • Rigid mounted with parking kit available
  • Easy maintenance for increased up time
  • 977 pounds (444 kg) of lift capacity



Front End Loaders | D160 Loader | John Deere US
 

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I think your dealer is confused about the loader. The d160 loader, according to Deere's website, is compatible with the 3 series E tractors. (See below)

Let me just say that while you now think you will be unlikely to remove the loader very often, you will find all sorts of ways to use your tractor once you get it that you never imagined. Chances are you will be taking the loader on and off more often and you may just want to drop the bucket and use the FEL arms for other purposes, which you cant do as easily or quickly with the pin on bucket.

Also, while the D series loader is less money, they are also MUCH harder to sell down the road as most people do want the easy removable loader for very good reason. Dealers quote the 1023e and the D120 loader when in competition with other brands, especially the imports like Mahindra, etc. But that tractor combination is sold less than 5% of all the sales of 1 series tractors. Its basically a lead item to draw customers in to look at the units.

The D loader also comes with the smaller loader bucket and its a pin on model, which is far less handy to remove and use your FEL for other purposes. Also, the larger FEL bucket, which I think is 54" instead of 49" is only a $52 up charge, so its money very well spent.

As far as power, the 1023e has about 90% of the power which the 1025r has. I saw Deere's production numbers earlier this year and roughly 96% of the 1 series tractors they build and sell are the 1025R.

Personally, I looked at the 1023e and decided the additional cost was well warranted for my needs and purposes. The better seat, the 3 point controls, having the PTO output shaft RPM's shown in your gauge display when you are using the PTO is very handy to know what your implement is actually doing. The additional lights on the tractor, etc.

Check out many of the 1, 2 and 3 series tractors which are up for resale and you will find the E series is well represented with the "D" series loaders. The "E" series tractors in the 3 series and above do not have a front PTO drive option, which is a limiting factor for machines of that size. That means no front snow blowers or brooms, no Mid mount Mowers, etc. While the 1023e does have the front PTO option on the machines, the larger "E" series do not and its not available as an upgrade or enhancement, either.

I mention this because you can purchase a 3025e for just a little more than you would pay for the 1025R. The 3025e has the same engine as the 1025r and the same horse power and torque ratings. But the 3025e does not have a front PTO drive option. The 3025e has greater lifting capabilities than the 1025r because of the larger hydraulic pump. so it lifts more and lifts it faster and higher.

If you are not going to be mowing with a Mid mount mower and plan on using the front end loader for a lot of "dirt work", then the 3025e is a machine to consider as it's very close to the price point of the 1025r. But the 3025e is a much larger and heavier machine, which depending upon your needs can be a good thing or a bad thing. These are the reasons why so many people buying tractors struggle to decide which machine to purchase.

New tractor buyers tend to underestimate their needs and often buy less machine than they should. Rarely are machine sold without at least 2 or 3 additional implements and often owners add even more. I think I am up to 10 implements now, having added the 60" Frontier Landscape rake to my equipment today.

At 5 acres to maintain, you have several very good options which are pretty close in price to one another. Of course, each property is different, but you will find so many ways to use your machine to help maintain and improve your property that you will wonder how you got along with it. The horsepower and torque are important for ground engaging implements, like rototillers and discs, etc. The type of soil you have also makes a big difference. No one ever regrets having more power and torque than they need. Having less power and torque may mean it just takes you longer to complete the same tasks as compared to the higher horsepower / torque options.

There are plenty of owners of both 1023e and 1025r who are very happy with their machines. Personally, I would opt for the `120R or H120 loader for the ease of adding and dropping the bucket, etc. One of the handiest implements / attachments I own are my pallet forks. I bet I put them on and take them off at least 2 or 3 times each week for some project. The D loader requires more time and effort to switch from the bucket to the forks or grapple, etc. With the R series, it's a matter of 10 seconds to switch.

With Deere's 0% financing, every $1,000 of additional cost raises the payment $16.66 per month. Now, that wasn't a consideration in my purchase as I paid cash for my equipment, but when those who are buying new consider the additional cost of accessories, attachments and implements, keep the $16.66 per month of additional payment per $1,000 of cost in mind.

Sit on the machines and drive each and see if the seat is important to you. When spending several hours sitting there, it does matter more to people with back / hip and other joint issues. But that's just one consideration. Bottom line, you will likely be very happy with either. D160Loader


  • Compatible with the 3032E and 3038E
  • Rigid mounted with parking kit available
  • Easy maintenance for increased up time
  • 977 pounds (444 kg) of lift capacity



Front End Loaders | D160 Loader | John Deere US
Wow I didn't even see that the dealer was stating a D160 loader for a 1023e. Yeah that's wrong, plain and simple. No way that fits. Kudos to Sulleybear for noticing that ginormous oversight on dealers part.

I went with the 1025R for three main reasons in 2014. The upgraded seat with the arm rests, the fender lights since I plow snow in the dark usually with it and seem to mow lawn in the dark more often that not anymore. The third and biggest reason was the position control on the 3pt hitch.
 

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Get a 1025R with a 120R loader and don't look back. Since you will do much more with this tractor than what you currently think, you will appreciate the extra's it comes with.
 

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agree 1025R with the r120 loader with 53" bucket. Once in a lifetime purchase. 0% five years
 

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You get the judgement of what $1800 is worth to you. Less than 10% increase in HP, a different seat that still sucks, a piece of rubber floor, some lights I’m not going to use and a 3 point stop that I can’t see the need for, is the difference. Oh yeah tilt steering wheel on a tractor .....really? Ive had cars that don’t have that or cruise controll. Having added features for the sake of saying you have them is goofy. The only thing I changed on mine is replaced the seat with a high back aftermarket one. So why spend money on something your gonna get rid of? A pile of :gizmo::gizmo::gizmo: might be better spent on attachment that performs a useful task.
 

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My local JD dealer says they don't recommend putting a FEL on anything smaller than a 1025R. He's quoted me a 1025R with the JD D160XLV FEL. I've seen 1023E's with a FEL. I know the 1023E is less HP than the 1025R (at slightly less cost - about $1800). I'm also wanting a finishing mower and a box blade. I've got about 5 acres to attend to - nothing extreme - mowing, mulching leaves, moving dirt, mulch, and gravel around. Any strong opinions for one model over the other? Is the 1025R worth the extra cost? Will the 1023E perform okay with the FEL?
It's too bad you couldn't try a demo of each one to get a feel for the tractors. I rented a 2017 1023e (only 80 hours) to grade my entire back yard (I have 3.5 acres) when I put in an in ground pool. It had an H120 FEL and 5 ft York Basic Line rake. I liked it so much that I bought it. After I bought it, I went back to the dealer and saw he had a few 1025rs for sale and only one 1023e that was getting ready for delivery. I asked him if he really sold that many more 1025rs? Are they that much better? He laughed and said the reason you see more 1025rs is because he's sold out of the 1023es. Now, I'm new and don't know that much about tractors. However, the 1023e is a very capable machine. If the aforementioned extras on the 1025r are "critical" for your uses, it's worth considering. If not, I don't think you'll be disappointed with the 1023e. That's just my option after experience with a my 1023e.
 

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You get the judgement of what $1800 is worth to you. Less than 10% increase in HP, a different seat that still sucks, a piece of rubber floor, some lights I’m not going to use and a 3 point stop that I can’t see the need for, is the difference. Oh yeah tilt steering wheel on a tractor .....really? Ive had cars that don’t have that or cruise controll. Having added features for the sake of saying you have them is goofy. The only thing I changed on mine is replaced the seat with a high back aftermarket one. So why spend money on something your gonna get rid of? A pile of :gizmo::gizmo::gizmo: might be better spent on attachment that performs a useful task.
What did you conquer with your MCUT - Page 240
You see, when you actually use your tractor many of these "unneeded" creature comforts are pretty comfortable. Cruise and tilt were something I wouldn't want to be without, and believe it or not, there's more to "piece of rubber floor" than meets the eye. You should give it a try before knocking it. :good2:
 
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