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Discussion Starter #1
I recently purchased a 1025 and am now considering either a box blade or a rear blade with "side extensions" on it. My primary use is to remove snow, smooth out some dirt in places in the yard and maintain my gravel driveway. Anyone ever used the grader blade with side extensions? I understand they are removable for when you need to use the blade on an angle. I figured if I ever need to do any serious earthmoving, I would then just rent a box blade for that project.
 

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If you are going to use it for mostly snow, I would go with the blade, not the box blade (BB). The BB would be overkill and a bit more expensive to get. While the BB will work, I do no think it would be in your best interest. You can also level the yard with the regular blade.
 

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A box blade won't move snow well. The blade will fill up and then start packing snow against the rear of the tractor, and you have to drive over the dump location to empty it unless you lift the blade and back over the pile you just pulled up then push it off with the loader. A rear blade at an angle works much better to roll the snow off to the side. It's also more versatile for working on ditches or creating a crown in the road.

Box blades have scarifier teeth which are better for working hard packed dirt or breaking up gravel, and they also move material much better than a grader blade.

They both have a place. A great setup would be a plow on the loader so you don't have to drive trough the snow before you move it, and a box blade for heavy grading work.
 

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I've been maintaining my gravel driveway and plowing snow with a rear blade for 30+ years. Sometimes I pull material forward and other times I push backwards using the curve side of the blade. For everything except moving in a straight line the side wings would end up being a PITA. They would also be a pain to keep installing and removing all the time.

I recommend getting the blade without the side wings and see how it works for you. For most blades the side wings are purchased separately anyway so you can always add them later. Verify the available of such an option when choosing a blade.
 

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They both have a place. A great setup would be a plow on the loader so you don't have to drive trough the snow before you move it, and a box blade for heavy grading work.
I agree. With a small tractor like the 1-series you will likely have to plow in reverse with a rear blade as the snow between the blade and the tractor will get really deep unless you have the blade angled. An angled blade doesn't work very well with side wings.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the insights. I meant to say that I was considering the side extensions on the grader blade for the instances where it would be used to move dirt, like a box blade. Figured I could install the extensions for those few occasions when I need that sort of blade. I had both blades for the tractor I just sold. I found that the box blade got very little use as compared to the grader blade, once I got my yard and driveway put in. Both of those were too big for the 1025, so I sold them.
 

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Went with a Craig's list RBC 60 rear blade ($250) Picked up a horse stall mat from tractor supply, cut a strip and bolted it between moldboard and cutting edge. Basically a squeege to clean up after using front blower. Went in this direction from a lot of help and advice from guys on the forum.

image.jpg
 

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I recently purchased a 1025 and am now considering either a box blade or a rear blade with "side extensions" on it. My primary use is to remove snow, smooth out some dirt in places in the yard and maintain my gravel driveway. Anyone ever used the grader blade with side extensions? I understand they are removable for when you need to use the blade on an angle. I figured if I ever need to do any serious earthmoving, I would then just rent a box blade for that project.

Hey neighbor! What part of Indiana are you from?

I'd like to raise a more general comment about attachments for the 1-series.
I have found that having the right attachment for the job is what makes the tractor valuable. If one is willing to spend $15,000+ on a tractor, I would encourage them not to scrimp on attachments.

In this case, for snow removal, I would recommend the front blade. It is much easier to remove snow with a front blade than a rear blade.
It costs about $1300 and will last forever if you keep it inside.

Then, if you need to move dirt, choose your favorite type of rear blade. I would choose the box blade myself.

Just my opinion.

Tim
 

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Discussion Starter #9
timmarks, I live south west of Bloomington, between Bedford and Bloomfield. I appreciate all of the comments/suggestions. One of my criteria is to reduce the number of one function attachments. I have downsized in both facilities and equipment. Got rid of 2 tractors (a mid size utility/loader tractor and a large garden tractor/mower) and acquired the 1025 as an "in between" replacement. I need to find attachments that meet my needs but also serve more than one function, where possible. That was the genesis of the original question.
 

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timmarks, I live south west of Bloomington, between Bedford and Bloomfield. I appreciate all of the comments/suggestions. One of my criteria is to reduce the number of one function attachments. I have downsized in both facilities and equipment. Got rid of 2 tractors (a mid size utility/loader tractor and a large garden tractor/mower) and acquired the 1025 as an "in between" replacement. I need to find attachments that meet my needs but also serve more than one function, where possible. That was the genesis of the original question.
Yep. I get it. You can probably do fine with a rear blade in that area...for at least MOST of the snowfalls. The extra heavy ones will be a challenge, but the typical 4-6 inches should be doable.

Tim
 
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