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Hey guys I’m coming up on having my 1025r for 1 year. It has just under 38hrs. Should I change the engine oil and fuel filters yearly since I’ll probably never hit the hr intervals? I think I read somewhere that there is probably break in oil in there now, should I replace with break in oil until I hit a certain number of hrs?

Thanks
Steve
 

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I would change the engine oil and filter now to get the "built-in crap" out. Initial change of fuel filter too. Then annually on engine oil/filter and every other year on the fuel filter. My thoughts.
 

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You can download manual on line. You can change oils at 50 hrs. However after that it is 200 hrs. So at 38 hrs. for year you can go about 5 years unless you have a lot of contaminates. This is per manual. I don't know where that annual thing came from as tractors go by hrs. of use. I had a friend that was "always" changing oils and I tried to get him to give me his changed oils as he was throwing away money. I suspected he was over flushing his seals and if anything causing leakages as he always complained about that. John Deere oil has high detergent I don't know who manufactures but I would just go by the manual. By the way the manuals are free to download and I don't think JD gives paper manuals but I may be wrong.
 

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Annually or the reached hours in the owners manual is a good idea. Otherwise, too much time can pass between services. In our area, the various seasons cause moisture in the fluids, etc. from the extreme cold to the summer heat.

A couple of tips, write the date and hours on your oil filter with a grease pen or permanent marker after you have changed it. It helps to keep the actual date and hours clear when the service took place. I also have a cabinet in the garage where I keep filters, etc and I have a piece of paper taped to the inside door of the cabinet to keep the service history of all lawn machinery and equipment on the sheet. Its a good reminder and one place for all of the actual history of your service.

I would also change the hydraulic fluid and clean the screen as well. Just make sure to have a catch pan which can hold over 4 gallons of oil and that fits under the tractor where you need it.

I buy the Low Viscosity fluid in 5 gallon buckets as you also need to use the same fluid in the front axle on your tractor. Don't forget to change the fluid in that, and watch it closely for metallic debris. I suggest changing the axle with a separate catch pan, something much smaller, as the amount of fluid is far less. Then once you have emptied the 5 gallon pail, its a handy container for recycling the oils from the tractor as it seals well and is easy to transport with the handle and the pour spout on top of the 5 gallon pail, which pulls out to avoid splashing, etc.

Also, check your under the floor fuel filter and replace it, as this catches all of the crud and water in the fuel, if any.

Don't forget to pull the inner and outer air cleaner filters and check them and also clean the canister. If you mow with this machine, there will likely be some dust in there. At such low hours, I would just put a clean rag on the concrete floor and tap the filters FLAT on the surface to displace any dust, etc. DON"T blow them with compressed air as it can collapse the filters and actually embed the dust and dirt even more. If you do use compressed air, blow from the INSIDE OUT, with the air going into the center of the filter directed out, not the other way........

If you run a high quality diesel fuel treatment in all of your fuel, year around, you will not have any fuel issues in any season. With as few hours as you run your machine, running the fuel treatment is helpful in preventing moisture in your fuel. I like Howe's fuel treatment, or Standyne, Royal Purple, etc. Just make sure it is DIESEL FUEL treatment and NOT "Fuel Treatment". Lucas sells their "fuel treatment" and cleaner for gas or oil. I run that in my gas engine equipment, but NOT in my diesel. Diesel fuel is very different and needs a dedicated diesel fuel product. (y)

Holler if you have any questions or need help............Happy first service.......
 

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Here is a link in the John Deere manual which states their recommended "Annual" service list. On the left side of the screen, using the up and down arrow, scan down to Section 8 and click on the "Annually" interval under the service intervals and it states.
Annually

  • Clean radiator and oil cooler fins.
  • Check radiator coolant freeze point and clarity of coolant. See your John Deere Dealer for service, or to order a John Deere Coolant Test Kit.
  • Check and service air filter elements. Check and service air filter elements when restriction indicator is red (1025R).
  • Change engine oil and filter if less than 200 hours of operation.
  • Drain water from fuel tank and replace fuel filters.
  • Check all hoses and clamps.
  • Check battery electrolyte level.
Here is the link to get you to the manual online


 

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Apologize for the 200 hrs. On the electronic manual it said the change oil at 200 hrs, however I did see the annual . Maybe it should have read annual or 200 hrs whichever comes first. Good point and I stand corrected.
 

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Anyone have any thoughts on if I should use break-in oil on the engine oil change??

Thanks
Personally, I wouldn't use break in oil as my opinion is that the engine is as "broken in" as its likely to be before normal wear.

Here is why I say that, assuming you run the engine at an average of 2,200 RPM's (it idles at 1,500....) for the 38 hours, that is 132,000 revolutions per hour (2,200 x 60 minutes) and times 38 hours equals 5,016,000 engine revolutions. If its not broken in after revolving 5 million times, I don't know when it would be broken in......

Even at idle, the engine after 38 hours would have 3,420,000 revolutions.

Again, my opinion, I am sure others have other views
 

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Apologize for the 200 hrs. On the electronic manual it said the change oil at 200 hrs, however I did see the annual . Maybe it should have read annual or 200 hrs whichever comes first. Good point and I stand corrected.
Hey, you are allowed a "miss" every so often. Now, that was your limit for the next 1,000 posts, not that we will be watching....... :giggle:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Personally, I wouldn't use break in oil as my opinion is that the engine is as "broken in" as its likely to be before normal wear.

Here is why I say that, assuming you run the engine at an average of 2,200 RPM's (it idles at 1,500....) for the 38 hours, that is 132,000 revolutions per hour (2,200 x 60 minutes) and times 38 hours equals 5,016,000 engine revolutions. If its not broken in after revolving 5 million times, I don't know when it would be broken in......

Even at idle, the engine after 38 hours would have 3,420,000 revolutions.

Again, my opinion, I am sure others have other views
Your opinion makes sense.
 

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Sulley: Great job on the math. Like I previously advise many don't put much hrs. on the tractor and I understand John Deere's approach. I would say it's geared to the warranty as only a few hrs. each year would not degregate the oil, however I suppose with moisture there would be some contamination. I've had dozen's of John Deere's and personally...not speaking for others...not even sure John Deere has the best oil. I've never been able to know who produces their oil. As a fact on older tractors I found it may not be the best. Now having said this...this is only my opinion and not trying to influence other. Haven't switched to synthetic but have considered.
 

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Sulley: Great job on the math. Like I previously advise many don't put much hrs. on the tractor and I understand John Deere's approach. I would say it's geared to the warranty as only a few hrs. each year would not degregate the oil, however I suppose with moisture there would be some contamination. I've had dozen's of John Deere's and personally...not speaking for others...not even sure John Deere has the best oil. I've never been able to know who produces their oil. As a fact on older tractors I found it may not be the best. Now having said this...this is only my opinion and not trying to influence other. Haven't switched to synthetic but have considered.
Mobil has been their additive supplier and blender. But remember, just because it is Mobil (or any other company), the fluids are blended per Deere specifications. So the "off the shelf" non-Deere product may not necessarily be the same as the Deere product.
 

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I have also used Deere oil and filters in my tractor since it was new. The oil is about the same price as a quality off the shelf engine oil. I’m sure you can buy an equivalent low viscosity match to HyGard but after the initial service how often are you really going to change it? I just changed the engine and hydraulic oils on my x758 It cost me $118 from my Deere dealer. $40 of that was for the hydraulic filter. I did try to cross that and can’t find one anywhere.
 

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I use Amsoil Synthetic oil blended for the specific machine. For example, they have an oil which is designed for small engines which are air cooled and they also have Diesel engine blends, etc. I have been very pleased with the results using the Amsoil products.

I certainly don't think the John Deere branded oils are inferior. I do feel the objective of Deere is to provide an engine oil which achieves the following, simultaneously;
  • Provides lubrication to minimize excessive wear and reduce premature product failure
  • Provides a profit margin for the dealers and the company to meet their targeted goals
  • Provides Deere with the most favorable economic results, based upon the massive volume of oil products which they sell with their name on the container.
I do feel when companies are selling a product, such as the Deere oil, they are trying to achieve several simultaneous goals, some which might not be the same as the consumers. For example, when Harley Davidson was looking for a supplier for their "Synthetic Brand" oil, they were close to a deal with Mobil One and the issue which ended up killing the deal, was Mobil One wanted to have their logo, in a tiny size, on the back side of the oil quart bottle. The proposed logo was like 1/4" x 1/4" square, down in one corner on the back of the bottle.

Harley would not agree to it, feeling customers would see Mobil One was supplying their oil and simply use the Mobil One product directly, without buying the Harley branded oil. In the end, they chose another oil supplier, which in my personal opinion, is inferior to Mobil One. These are the types of factors which impact a companies "oil offerings". Personally, I would rather just purchase the best product I can, for my needs. That is my goal and my concern when considering the offerings from various companies.

Oil lubricates as its primary function, but it also performs critical component cooling as well as collecting any contaminants and wear debris, to hopefully be filtered out of the system. Many people insist there is no difference in the oil and it doesn't make any difference what is used, as they insist its all marketing hype. Personally, I don't agree with such thinking, but each person is entitled to their own opinion.

I also choose to run a friction reducing treatment product in my engines and in my tractors hydraulic systems. Many don't feel its necessary. To each their own.

For years, I drag raced at the Top Sportsman levels, where engines are a substantial investment. Each engine would cost as much as half a dozen 1025r tractors. I used Reher Morrison in Texas to build my race engines. They were very specific about using the friction reducing treatment in their engines to help reduce valve train component wear. They also recommended against using synthetic oils because we changed the engine oil every single day we raced, sometimes, several times per day.

One of the reasons the race engine oil is changed so often is because of the fuel used and the volume of fuel which the engine consumed. When you are dumping GALLONS of alcohol racing fuel into an engine in a matter of 6 or 7 seconds, there is fuel which ends up in the oil contaminating it. Also, we were always monitoring the oil and filters, opening every filter and inspecting it, for any sign of engine excessive wear or failure.

The engine oil would get the equivalent of maybe 10 total minutes of engine run time, between changes. Since the oil was changed so often, they didn't feel the extra cost of the synthetic oil was justified. However, in their "street engines", which are treated like daily driving cars, they did suggest the premium synthetic engine oils be used since the oil wasn't changed so often. They also suggested the friction reducing product always be used. I have continued that practice into all of the equipment I have which uses fuel and motor oil.

Each person needs to do what they feel is best for their situation and equipment needs.
 

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I have also used Deere oil and filters in my tractor since it was new. The oil is about the same price as a quality off the shelf engine oil. I’m sure you can buy an equivalent low viscosity match to HyGard but after the initial service how often are you really going to change it? I just changed the engine and hydraulic oils on my x758 It cost me $118 from my Deere dealer. $40 of that was for the hydraulic filter. I did try to cross that and can’t find one anywhere.
Green Parts shows that filter as $33.16 and that doesn't reflect the GTT member discount, but I don't know how their shipping works, so that has to be considered as well. My dealer and I know many dealers do, offer a fluid and filter sale twice a year, where they offer deals on the maintenance items. The discounts are 15% or more and I usually pick up the 5 gallon buckets of Low Viscosity fluid and the other filters, etc at the same time so help minimize the costs. The sales are February and August at my dealer, you might want to check to see if your dealer offers such an event.


John Deere also uses that same filter on 178 other applications, so perhaps searching under another model number, which has been around longer, instead of the Deere part number might provide solutions. For example, its the same filter used on my 455 which is 25 years old.


I searched under the 455 and it shows these options, at a much lower cost..Double check the filter sizes next to one another and make sure the seal lines up, etc. I know I haven't ever paid $40 for a filter for that tractor.....Just a thought.......
Screenshot_2020-04-01 john deere 455 hydraulic oil filter - Google Search.png
 
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