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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
First, thanks to all the knowledgeable members posting their insight on all sorts of topics about our tractors and equipment. A super high five to Tractor Time With Tim for his videos. I don't have a service manual yet, and Johnny's Essential Oils series are great info on how to do fluid changes. Thank you Mr. Marks. :thumbup1gif:

All went well on my service, easy as pie, and I thought I'd share some info. No, I didn't take a video. No, I didn't take photos.

I bought the tractor used, with 100 hrs on it. The previous owner had done the 50 hr service, making a couple things notable.

I started by removing the loader, the 3 point hitch arms, and dropped the ROPS to horizontal. I only dropped the ROPS so I could get into my garage (don't have to drop it to get in my barn, but I did the work in the garage).

I put down some large pieces of cardboard, and 4) 30" pieces of 4X6. 4 wheel low, and drove right up on them. Now I had more ground clearance, and being 5' 8", I didn't hit my head on the ROPS being horizontal. Bonus.

Started with changing the outer air filter. Un-clipped the bungee cord retainer and had to loosen the rear air intake hose some, so I could wiggle the filter out. It was pretty dirty and needed to be changed. The inner air filter looked good. No dirt on it and I could see light through it from every direction. Inspected the filter bracket, that is known to crack, and didn't see any problem.

Next I drained the trans. I used a large kitty litter pan I have to drain into. It held all the oil with room to spare. The extra ground clearance also allowed the pan to get in there easily. Oil was nice and golden.

I forgot to lower the mower lift before I started and thought I was going to fight getting the spin on hydro filter off. Then I realized I could lower the autoconnect by pulling the pins from where the turnbuckles attach to the autoconnect arms. Bam. Autoconnect lowered. Filter came off easily with a band type filter wrench (it had been done at 50 hrs).

Then came the suction screen removal, and where Tim's video was invaluable (not the clamp part, I hate spring clamps. Took me 15 minutes to get the lower one and the hose to move up. Replaced with worm clamps. Ain't doing that again). I didn't remove the left rear wheel, and I have the backhoe frame to contend with also. Just like Tim's, the suction screen came out through the BH frame. Perfect. Inspection revealed a small amount of shavings on the screen. Nothing to be alarmed about and I was happy to see. At first I couldn't see the magnet inside...it was all the way in, near the closed end. Shook it a bit and it slid to where I could pull it out with needlenose pliers. No shavings on it, but wiping it, it had like grey "dirt". Nothing I'm concerned with. Stuck an extendable magnet into the trans case and didn't pull out any shavings. :) Re-assembled everything and started filling with Lo Vis Hygard. Manual calls for 13 qts, in the end I put in 14 to get it in the hash marks, after I started the tractor later.

Next drained the engine and changed the filter. No surprises. Tim has a Deere part number on his Web page (Tractor Time With Tim) for a wrench that fits the engine filter. TY26639, I believe. Fit perfectly and made removal/install a breeze.

Moving on, started the draining of the front axle. Small kitty litter pan for this. Opened the drain first, then the fill cap to get it to flow faster. Used a couple coffee cans for draining the hubs (since I was up on 4X6's and had clearance). Cans are 5" tall. Most of the oil came out in the cans, filled each close to halfway. Guessing I got less than a quart out of the main axle drain, but didn't measure it. At this point I haven't removed the vents at the hubs. It drained nicely, I wasn't sure I would have too. But I did when I went to refill, thinking it would help bleeding the air out of the hubs. :dunno: After refilling the oil, it was more than an hour (letting the oil "settle") to do my next step (and pouring the old hydro oil into some jugs for disposal). One thing to note, the oil appeared gold-ish when draining, but was actually green-ish gold, when it "gathered" in the catch cans and the drain pan. The cans were clean when I started. Thoughts? Normal "dirt" from inside the axle?

Onward to the fuel filters. Using a small coffee can to catch the filter and drippings, I shut off the fuel valve and removed the main filter on the engine. Now is when I was thinking I might have to panic soon. The fuel kept bleeding out of the housing. Thinking the fuel shut off was leaking I had to work fast. Got the filter and bowl out of the can, propped the can up with the channel locks to catch the fuel and boogied quickly to the bench. Looking in the bowl, no sediment. Cleaned the bowl, spring and indicator washer. Grabbed the new filter and scurried back to the tractor. Breathing a sigh of relief, the dripping had stopped. :slap-yourself-emoti: Duh! Contents under pressure...now not. Whew.

Now the Ole under the floorboard filter. Clamped the hose between the filter and tank with vise grips, and worked great. Have I mentioned I hate spring clamps? Finally got the clamp rotated to get it off and then the filter off the hose at the tank end. The filter never had the 1/4" barb cut off so that added to the challenge. :banghead: Oh well....the front axle oil just got 20 more minutes of "settling" in time.

Reading a post here on GTT I had bought a 5/16 fuel shut off valve. I was going to install it, but couldn't find a good place to relocate the filter to. Immediately forward of where the filter was (and where the shut off would go) is bracketry and house retaining clamps. There is a small spot beyond that, but it would be very close to where the pre-formed bend in the hose is, and I didn't want to chance it. Under the hood, before the pump, is a good section of straight hose, but I'm unsure if that's where I want to put it. In the end, I just replaced the filter, back in its original location, with worm clamps. I'll look into the shut off valve again at some other time. I've got 200 hrs run time to think about it.

Only thing I didn't get to was changing the thermostat. Going to put in the 180. Anyone got tips on getting the grille and battery tray out so I can drain some coolant first?

Hope this article helps someone with their 200 hr service sometime. If you got some mechanical skills, this is easy, just a little messy. Nothing Gojo can't fix though.
 

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I don't believe you have to remove the battery (and tray) and grill to drain the coolant. There is a little silcock down at the bottom of the radiator on the right side. When you open this valve, coolant will drain through a hose just below it. You'll need a pan or jug underneath that hose beneath the tractor. (Don't mistakenly put your pan under the battery drain hose.) This won't completely drain the coolant. You'll also have to open a coolant port on the right side of the engine to drain it. This is the really messy one. I tie-wrap a funnel beneath this port with a hose leading to a jug, but there will still be mess. Be careful not to drop the plug into the funnel, because the coolant really comes out fast and the plug will block the funnel from draining and that could be really exciting. Not that a skilled mechanic like me would do something like that. Wear coolant-colored clothing.
 
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Thank you keane.
Wear a scuba suit and set up a bio-hazard containment field. Got it. :laugh:
I did see the 2 hoses under there when I was doing the front axle. Thought one was the battery, but didn't trace the other one. That makes sense.
Thanks a lot, I'll see what I can do.
 
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