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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all - Ok, so I have installed the JD 47" snowblower and have a few questions:

  • Should I grease ALL snowblower fittings before EVERY use?
  • I bought some JD Grease... but I had some non-JD grease at home. Comparing the two, the JD Lithium Grease seems to be a 'general duty' grease, while the Lucas Grease I bought at Menard's seems to be rated for high temperatures, and high speed bearings.... it almost seems like the Lukas brand would be 'better.' Which one would protect better.... and can I put in a non-JD grease?
  • How do I know when I have enough grease in the Auger shaft? The sales guy at the JD dealer told me to grease it *just until* I felt a little resistance in the grease gun handle and then quit...so I don't 'blow out any seals.' That sounded odd to me.... my experience has always been to grease a 'zert' until it starts squeezing out of the joint. What is the proper way to grease the various zerts on the various shafts/auger, etc so I don't screw something up?

Also.... just for fun... thought I would include a picture of my 'snow blower fleet'..... it's like the Goldilocks story....baby, momma, and poppa sized. Snow blower OCD overload here.

Thanks!
 

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Corndog Hater
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As long as the 2 greases are comparable, you should be fine. I go by the numbers on the tubes. I grease my blower, which is the same one you have, at the beginning and mid way through the season. I put anywhere from 10-20 hours on per winter. I usually back off the grease gun when I just see a little grease at the joint. But I'm no expert....
 

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I've always pumped grease into u-joints until I see a little squirm out, have never had a failure as a result. the seal is basically just a rubber cap that fits snug.

As far as frequency, every use is not necessary, I do all of mine on my blower once a season.
 

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Hi all - Ok, so I have installed the JD 47" snowblower and have a few questions:


  • Should I grease ALL snowblower fittings before EVERY use?
The operator's manual for the snow blower is your best source of information.

Before Each Use
Lubricate discharge chute

Beginning of Season

Adjust and lubricate drive chain

Every 25 Hours
Check auger gearbox oil level
Lubricate driveshaft
Lubricate auger shaft
  • I bought some JD Grease... but I had some non-JD grease at home. Comparing the two, the JD Lithium Grease seems to be a 'general duty' grease, while the Lucas Grease I bought at Menard's seems to be rated for high temperatures, and high speed bearings.... it almost seems like the Lukas brand would be 'better.' Which one would protect better.... and can I put in a non-JD grease?
JD recommends the following grease:

John Deere Multi-Purpose SD Polyurea Grease
John Deere Multi-Purpose HD Lithium Complex Grease
If not using any of the preferred greases, be sure to use a general all-purpose grease with an NLGI grade No.2 rating.

You shouldn't have to worry about high temperatures or high speed bearings.

  • How do I know when I have enough grease in the Auger shaft? The sales guy at the JD dealer told me to grease it *just until* I felt a little resistance in the grease gun handle and then quit...so I don't 'blow out any seals.' That sounded odd to me.... my experience has always been to grease a 'zert' until it starts squeezing out of the joint. What is the proper way to grease the various zerts on the various shafts/auger, etc so I don't screw something up?
There aren't any seals in the snow blower that you have to worry about blowing out. You want to grease the auger until you see some grease coming out on each side near the shear bolts. When greasing the auger for the first time you'll want to remove the two shear bolts so that you can rotate the outer auger tube. This will allow the grease to be distributed around the tube. The auger grease only serves to keep the inner shaft from rusting fast to the outer auger tube. If the two shafts corrode it can prevent the shear bolts from working properly.

The other places that need grease are the U-joints on the two drive shafts. Again, grease until you see some oozing out from the U-joint.

The other lubrication areas are the gear box which uses GL-5, the cables and pulleys, and the drive chain. You want to ensure the gear box is full of oil. Lubricating the drive chain and keeping it properly adjusted are extremely important to ensure long life of the chain and sprockets. You may find the chain needs re-tightening the first few hours of usage. Do not make it too tight. You are better with the chain being a tad loose rather than too tight.

Again, the manual will give you all the details on the various lubrication points and the proper lubrication to use in each area.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The operator's manual for the snow blower is your best source of information.

Before Each Use
Lubricate discharge chute

Beginning of Season

Adjust and lubricate drive chain

Every 25 Hours
Check auger gearbox oil level
Lubricate driveshaft
Lubricate auger shaft


JD recommends the following grease:

John Deere Multi-Purpose SD Polyurea Grease
John Deere Multi-Purpose HD Lithium Complex Grease
If not using any of the preferred greases, be sure to use a general all-purpose grease with an NLGI grade No.2 rating.

You shouldn't have to worry about high temperatures or high speed bearings.


There aren't any seals in the snow blower that you have to worry about blowing out. You want to grease the auger until you see some grease coming out on each side near the shear bolts. When greasing the auger for the first time you'll want to remove the two shear bolts so that you can rotate the outer auger tube. This will allow the grease to be distributed around the tube. The auger grease only serves to keep the inner shaft from rusting fast to the outer auger tube. If the two shafts corrode it can prevent the shear bolts from working properly.

The other places that need grease are the U-joints on the two drive shafts. Again, grease until you see some oozing out from the U-joint.

The other lubrication areas are the gear box which uses GL-5, the cables and pulleys, and the drive chain. You want to ensure the gear box is full of oil. Lubricating the drive chain and keeping it properly adjusted are extremely important to ensure long life of the chain and sprockets. You may find the chain needs re-tightening the first few hours of usage. Do not make it too tight. You are better with the chain being a tad loose rather than too tight.

Again, the manual will give you all the details on the various lubrication points and the proper lubrication to use in each area.
THANKS! I did read the manual, but sometimes a little practical 'real-world' experience is helpful too.... Much appreciated.

So... the manual says to fill the gear box oil up to level with the side plug.... do I have that right? It doesn't need to be completely 'filled' correct?

Also, regarding the CHAIN ADJUSTMENT: The manual says to ensure there is 3/16 -3/8" DEFLECTION. Does this mean that I should be able to push that distance of resistance on the 'center' of the chain between chain gears? It appears from the manual, that sliding the 'chain shield' left or right adjusts the tension on the chain? So... to reiterate; I should adjust the 'chain shield' so that I can push / distort the chain by 3/16 - 3/8" from it's natural state?

Thanks for the clarification.
 

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THANKS! I did read the manual, but sometimes a little practical 'real-world' experience is helpful too.... Much appreciated.
Understood. It's no secret that the manuals are sometimes a bit confusing to say the least.

So... the manual says to fill the gear box oil up to level with the side plug.... do I have that right? It doesn't need to be completely 'filled' correct?
Correct. The oil level should be at the check plug when the blower is sitting level. Normally they are a hair over full and when you remove the plug a little oil starts to dribble out. If no oil comes out take a little bent wire or something and reach in the oil to determine where the oil level is. As long as it is level with the check plug you will be fine.

Also, regarding the CHAIN ADJUSTMENT: The manual says to ensure there is 3/16 -3/8" DEFLECTION. Does this mean that I should be able to push that distance of resistance on the 'center' of the chain between chain gears? It appears from the manual, that sliding the 'chain shield' left or right adjusts the tension on the chain? So... to reiterate; I should adjust the 'chain shield' so that I can push / distort the chain by 3/16 - 3/8" from it's natural state?
Correct. Check the tension at the top by lifting up in the middle of the chain between the two sprockets. The snow blower sprockets are notorious for being a bit out of round so as you rotate the sprockets you may find tight and loose spots. Adjust the tension so that the tightest spot is within spec. Again, better to be a tad loose than too tight. Be aware that the tension can change slightly as you tighten the bracket bolts. It can be a bit frustrating at times. It usually takes me a few tries. Just be sure to rotate the chain completely around to check the tension a final time once everything is tightened up.
 

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Keep in mind a chain as it is running under load has a tension side as well as a slack side. One has to take up slack on the tension side to verify the slack side. If you have out of round (circular runout) sprockets especially the 40 tooth one I would change it. A 40 pitch chain is quite forgiving for some circular run out. Bearings don't like it. But face runout is tough on the chain and sprocket and the chain will fatigue because it is a flexing action. Definitely replace 40 tooth sprockets that has side to side wobble.
 

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Keep in mind a chain as it is running under load has a tension side as well as a slack side. One has to take up slack on the tension side to verify the slack side. If you have out of round (circular runout) sprockets especially the 40 tooth one I would change it. A 40 pitch chain is quite forgiving for some circular run out. Bearings don't like it. But face runout is tough on the chain and sprocket and the chain will fatigue because it is a flexing action. Definitely replace 40 tooth sprockets that has side to side wobble.
This is a brand new snowblower..... and one that JD has made for some time. Are you saying they have had this problem for years and have not fixed it? Or that I have a 40 tooth sprocket? Do I need to worry about this?
 

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Understood. It's no secret that the manuals are sometimes a bit confusing to say the least.



Correct. The oil level should be at the check plug when the blower is sitting level. Normally they are a hair over full and when you remove the plug a little oil starts to dribble out. If no oil comes out take a little bent wire or something and reach in the oil to determine where the oil level is. As long as it is level with the check plug you will be fine.



Correct. Check the tension at the top by lifting up in the middle of the chain between the two sprockets. The snow blower sprockets are notorious for being a bit out of round so as you rotate the sprockets you may find tight and loose spots. Adjust the tension so that the tightest spot is within spec. Again, better to be a tad loose than too tight. Be aware that the tension can change slightly as you tighten the bracket bolts. It can be a bit frustrating at times. It usually takes me a few tries. Just be sure to rotate the chain completely around to check the tension a final time once everything is tightened up.

Thanks for the great advice! Inspires confidence!!
 

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This is a brand new snowblower..... and one that JD has made for some time. Are you saying they have had this problem for years and have not fixed it? Or that I have a 40 tooth sprocket? Do I need to worry about this?

I have not had any issues but there were some discussion previous of sprockets welded off center as shipped from JD. Should be fixed by now if JD pays any attention to these discussions.

IMHO if yours runs true without wobble and slack stays constant should be good to go.
 

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This is a brand new snowblower..... and one that JD has made for some time. Are you saying they have had this problem for years and have not fixed it? Or that I have a 40 tooth sprocket? Do I need to worry about this?
Yes, the problem has existed for years. My 54" blower exhibits the problem. I have a brand new large sprocket and it too has the problem. It is nothing to really worry about and it doesn't really effect the operation of the snow blower. It just makes properly adjusting the chain a bit more challenging because of the tight spots.

Once you have your chain adjusted, manually move the sprocket 1/4 turn at a time and recheck the tension. You will no doubt find that the tension changes as you rotate the sprocket.
 
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The operator's manual for the snow blower is your best source of information.

Before Each Use
Lubricate discharge chute
I've only lubricated the discharge chute once each season. It's not that much fun that I'd do it every time I used the blower. I also believe that you can cause damage by disassembling something too often.

After 2 seasons, I completely disassembled the chute this year to inspect it. There is virtually no wear at all. In fact, the paint is still intact where the surfaces come together except at the designated "rub" points. I'm satisfied with only doing this once per season.

But I suppose it all depends on how much time you have the blower in use. I'm probably at no more that 10 to 12 hours per year. And I do adjust the chute frequently while operating.
 

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Grease for 47 Blower and More

Hello all,

I have been using "Magnalube G" Grease with PTFE. Over 20 years I have been using this grease.


All of the grease fittings in the tractor get it, mower deck too. Nothing has ever worn out with this grease.

I first ran into this grease at work, some special machines they bought required it. They thought it was too expensive
and used other types of grease. The bearings wore out in a week or so with all the different grease they tried.

Finally they bought the "Magnalube G", 3 months later they were still running, 16 to 20 hours a day 6 days a week.
They set a maintenance plan to replace the bearings every 4 months and never had a problem again.

It took me a while to find it. The best place to buy it is right from the company. The price has come down
from when I bought a case of it but still expensive compared to other grease but worth every cent. Magnalube G .jpg.png
 
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