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I'm getting mixed signals as to what is recommended by Deere at 50 hrs. Mainly the transmission oil change which seems to be the major item. I was under the impression it is 50 hours, but I have a chart that says 200 hours. Tractor Time with Tim says they changed it from 50 to 200 in 2018, but he still does it at 50. As a new JD owner I would say the one area they are lacking in is clear maintenance instructions.

At age 71 with arthritis and limited tools I am considering having my dealer pick up the tractor and service it. They are not nearby which makes it expensive, but the worst part is they say 10 days to 2 weeks turn around. I changed the motor oil at 25 hours at the salesman's suggestion and repaired a flat tire but the tranny job looks a little more complicated.
 

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Deere changed the maintenance intervals around 2018...there is a sticker attached to the underside of your hood with the recommenced maintenance schedule. You’ll always have people who want increase the maintenance intervals...that’s their choice, however Deere is very clear with their recommendations.


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It's not hard, but there is a lot of bending and depending on your level of planning, a lot of "get-ups and get-downs." I'm 49 and I know those are getting harder for me and for most of the 70+ generation I hang around that seems to be the main issue. Also, there are a few tools that are recommended and a couple that are mandatory like a large vessel for the fluid that comes out.

Where I'm going is, if I were you, at 71 with a JD manual that says change the Tranny fluid at 200 hours and a dealer that's not close by, I'd either 1) spend my money on a trailer (at least 16 feet) and take it to them myself (assuming you have a tow vehicle or know someone that does or 2) just go by what the manual says and wait for the 200 hours....or more specifically, knowing the 10-14 days I'd be without it I'd wait till my off-season when I'm close to or just over 200 hours.
 

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Make friends with a trailer owner. I pull mine around about as often for other people as I do myself.


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I have been in the middle of a project and can't deal with down time right this minute. The tractor has 92 hours on the clock and my grapple has developed a squeak That being said, I'm 68 and have a hard time bending due to a number of back injuries, but will still do the job myself. I have everything I need just waiting, all the filters, o-ring(s), oil, transmission fluid, etc.. So the plan is to do the maintenance next week when I'm probably going to be at or over 100 hours. Doing that will get me through the winter without worry and I'll feel secure knowing my mini beast is up to the snow plowing task.

PS - I greased the loader and grapple.
 

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The 50 hour service interval was to deal with the porosity treatment of the aluminum casting which comprises much of the rear assembly for these machines. For some reason, there was concern that the parts might not have been properly cleaned post porosity treatment and the 50 hour service interval permitted the part to endure several heat cycles, before the fluid change.

Also, there were issues early on with excessive amounts of RTV sealant being used in the case assembly. The excess RTV would "break off" the inside of the sealed case and get caught in the sump screen on the rear end assembly. When you pull the main sump screen, you will likely find small pieces of sealant the first time your machine is serviced. Usually, after the first service, little if any sealant is found in the system or on the sump screen.

There are photos here on GTT which show some of the sealant which was removed when the machines were first serviced and in extreme cases, there was enough pieces and strips of sealant caught in the suction screen to fill a cup sized container. There were some strips which were several inches long and looked like shoe laces in the sump system.

Changes were made in the porosity treatment cleaning process and also, the robots which apply the sealant to the case pieces were adjusted to reduce the application of the sealant to those pieces, yet still maintain enough sealant to properly seal the unit. As a result of these changes, the service interval was extended out to the 200 hour time frame.

Since the changes made in the assembly process, the machines serviced are showing much less sealant in the fluid or caught in the sump screen. In fact, many of those who have serviced their machines and posted photos were surprised at the small amounts of sealant and "how clean the magnets were" which allow mettalic wear material to be caught in the filtering and screening process.

Is there a "need" to change your new machine's hydraulic oil at or near 50 hours? In my opinion, no. I did the change at 50 hours on my machine because its a 2017 model. If I were to buy another 1025r today, I would wait until the 200 hour limit before I serviced the machine because the primary reasons for servicing the machine at the 50 hour time frame has changed.

Following the recommended service intervals is important in the machines long term service and to maintain the warranty coverage. I would follow the current posted guidelines for servicing the machine you are using, and not let the historical actions taken on machines due to special circumstances, which appear to have been remedied, alter the recommended service intervals for your machine.
 

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I do realize that my X730 is a totally different class JD tractor. However, my owners manual clearly states that the transaxle fluid and filter are scheduled for change at the 50hr maintenance service. I'm surprised that wouldn't be the same on all x series tractors as well as series #1 and #2 units.
 

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I did mine at 50 hours, even though it was recommended by Deere to wait until 200.
I did find sealant. It was not as much as Id seen on some videos or posts, but still a considerable amount.

The hard part on the 1025 vs my 2025 is removing the rear wheel to remove the screen.
You dont necessarily HAVE to remove the screen, but if you arent, there really isnt much point to do the service at 50 hours, as that is one of the biggest reasons folks still do the 50 hour service over waiting until 200.

Arthritis makes everything tougher, and I certainly wouldnt push anyone to do it that didnt feel like they could, but even with the wheel removal, its a relatively simple service, except for the fact that most factory filters are put on by a 500 pound gorilla. They can be a real pain to remove.
If you have a filter wrench, it will make it much easier.
 

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The 50 hour service interval was to deal with the porosity treatment of the aluminum casting which comprises much of the rear assembly for these machines. For some reason, there was concern that the parts might not have been properly cleaned post porosity treatment and the 50 hour service interval permitted the part to endure several heat cycles, before the fluid change.

Also, there were issues early on with excessive amounts of RTV sealant being used in the case assembly. The excess RTV would "break off" the inside of the sealed case and get caught in the sump screen on the rear end assembly. When you pull the main sump screen, you will likely find small pieces of sealant the first time your machine is serviced. Usually, after the first service, little if any sealant is found in the system or on the sump screen.

There are photos here on GTT which show some of the sealant which was removed when the machines were first serviced and in extreme cases, there was enough pieces and strips of sealant caught in the suction screen to fill a cup sized container. There were some strips which were several inches long and looked like shoe laces in the sump system.

Changes were made in the porosity treatment cleaning process and also, the robots which apply the sealant to the case pieces were adjusted to reduce the application of the sealant to those pieces, yet still maintain enough sealant to properly seal the unit. As a result of these changes, the service interval was extended out to the 200 hour time frame.

Since the changes made in the assembly process, the machines serviced are showing much less sealant in the fluid or caught in the sump screen. In fact, many of those who have serviced their machines and posted photos were surprised at the small amounts of sealant and "how clean the magnets were" which allow mettalic wear material to be caught in the filtering and screening process.

Is there a "need" to change your new machine's hydraulic oil at or near 50 hours? In my opinion, no. I did the change at 50 hours on my machine because its a 2017 model. If I were to buy another 1025r today, I would wait until the 200 hour limit before I serviced the machine because the primary reasons for servicing the machine at the 50 hour time frame has changed.

Following the recommended service intervals is important in the machines long term service and to maintain the warranty coverage. I would follow the current posted guidelines for servicing the machine you are using, and not let the historical actions taken on machines due to special circumstances, which appear to have been remedied, alter the recommended service intervals for your machine.
Fantastic post. Rather than just spouting a baseless opinion, you give the background information for the intervals and a bunch of evidence to support your view. Assuming your facts are correct, of course! And I'm not saying they aren't. Just wonderful information you provided here.

And for what is sure to cause even more debate - my 2019 build year and model year 1025R doesn't require an engine oil change until 200 hours!
 

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And for what is sure to cause even more debate - my 2019 build year and model year 1025R doesn't require an engine oil change until 200 hours!
I'm pretty sure if you look, it says annually at a minimum.
 
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I'm pretty sure if you look, it says annually at a minimum.
Yes, they actually have two different tables. A table for "Daily to Every 400 Hours" and a table for "Every 600 Hours to Every 6000 Hours."

The annual maintenance section is in the second table, and includes: engine oil & filter, check radiator coolant freeze point & clarity, replace fuel filter, service air filters, and clean radiator and oil cooler fins.

So, obviously whichever comes first. What is not on the annual list, is doing the transmission fluid and filter change. Looks like that remains 200 hours.

Good thing I've only owned mine for 11 months...not that 12 months is a magic date...
 
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The 50 hour service interval was to deal with the porosity treatment of the aluminum casting which comprises much of the rear assembly for these machines. For some reason, there was concern that the parts might not have been properly cleaned post porosity treatment and the 50 hour service interval permitted the part to endure several heat cycles, before the fluid change.

Also, there were issues early on with excessive amounts of RTV sealant being used in the case assembly. The excess RTV would "break off" the inside of the sealed case and get caught in the sump screen on the rear end assembly. When you pull the main sump screen, you will likely find small pieces of sealant the first time your machine is serviced. Usually, after the first service, little if any sealant is found in the system or on the sump screen.

There are photos here on GTT which show some of the sealant which was removed when the machines were first serviced and in extreme cases, there was enough pieces and strips of sealant caught in the suction screen to fill a cup sized container. There were some strips which were several inches long and looked like shoe laces in the sump system.

Changes were made in the porosity treatment cleaning process and also, the robots which apply the sealant to the case pieces were adjusted to reduce the application of the sealant to those pieces, yet still maintain enough sealant to properly seal the unit. As a result of these changes, the service interval was extended out to the 200 hour time frame.

Since the changes made in the assembly process, the machines serviced are showing much less sealant in the fluid or caught in the sump screen. In fact, many of those who have serviced their machines and posted photos were surprised at the small amounts of sealant and "how clean the magnets were" which allow mettalic wear material to be caught in the filtering and screening process.

Is there a "need" to change your new machine's hydraulic oil at or near 50 hours? In my opinion, no. I did the change at 50 hours on my machine because its a 2017 model. If I were to buy another 1025r today, I would wait until the 200 hour limit before I serviced the machine because the primary reasons for servicing the machine at the 50 hour time frame has changed.

Following the recommended service intervals is important in the machines long term service and to maintain the warranty coverage. I would follow the current posted guidelines for servicing the machine you are using, and not let the historical actions taken on machines due to special circumstances, which appear to have been remedied, alter the recommended service intervals for your machine.
Good post. Finally some concrete info on the service intervals. Nice job Sulley.
 

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TTWT (made you look Tim) did a video on how to do get the screen out without removing the wheel. I did it recently and it worked. Easier/faster maybe, but then you kind of have to get on the ground behind the tractor and you can't see the hex nut - instead of doing it from the side. Easier? Depends on each individual I guess.
 

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TTWT (made you look Tim) did a video on how to do get the screen out without removing the wheel. I did it recently and it worked. Easier/faster maybe, but then you kind of have to get on the ground behind the tractor and you can't see the hex nut - instead of doing it from the side. Easier? Depends on each individual I guess.
Right. If no fluid or wheel weights, removing the rear tire is trivial.

...and yea, I looked :)
 

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I'm pretty sure if you look, it says annually at a minimum.
Not mine. This is from my 2018 manual. Apparently they fixed it.
754215


754214
 

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Yeah, they must have changed it

754234
 

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I did the transmission on my 2019 1025R at 150 hours. Below is a copy/paste of a posting I made here.

Bobby



It is done, except for the air filter. That will be here in a few days. Also thanks for the idea about the fuel cut off valve. I have that on order also.

The transmission was a piece of cake. I drove up on 6 inch wooden blocks with all 4 tires. That gave me plenty of access to the tube and drain plug while sitting on my butt without leaning over in a strain. It was easy to remove the strainer tube. There really is no reason to remove the tire. I did not even remove the rear facing bolt that holds a bracket for the metal/rubber pipe.

The strainer looked about like others I have seen here. Fine metal and a couple of pieces of RTV sealant. I think it was fine to wait until 150 hours to do this service. Even the filter was not a problem. I have a 3 prong gripper filter wrench and there was enough room to use it.

I even got the grease fitting from hell. I found that I could grab the shaft and flywheel and twist the shaft until the fitting was lined up. I had to use a standard grease gun head instead of my quick connect. I will have a solution for that before the next 50 hours greasing.

I even checked the oil in the gear box on my 60 inch mower. The plug has a magnet and it had metal crud so you may want to check and clean off the crud even if you don't plan to change the grease.

It helps to have the correct tools. 6mm 1/2" allen socket, torque wrench, good filter wrench, etc. I have never regretted buying a tool.

It was a good day. Thanks for the help and ideas you guys shared.
 
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