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I am e4xtremely disappointed with the performance of my 1025R and 60D mower on my front lawn. The ground is sloped in every direction, rough with many divots, and there are a couple of low running areas that carry rainwater away from the downspouts. The 60D cuts unevenly being lower on the downhill slope by 1/2-3/4". I also get a little scalping.

My question is, will a smaller, say a 42" D-Series, help with my problem or will it have the same issues?

My 21" Honda push mower does a wonderful job, but after using a 60" swath, the 21" by hand has become excruciating. Yes I have become lazy....
 

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I am e4xtremely disappointed with the performance of my 1025R and 60D mower on my front lawn. The ground is sloped in every direction, rough with many divots, and there are a couple of low running areas that carry rainwater away from the downspouts. The 60D cuts unevenly being lower on the downhill slope by 1/2-3/4". I also get a little scalping.

My question is, will a smaller, say a 42" D-Series, help with my problem or will it have the same issues?

My 21" Honda push mower does a wonderful job, but after using a 60" swath, the 21" by hand has become excruciating. Yes I have become lazy....

I think you answered your own question Fred. Without a doubt you're going to get a better cut with a 21" mower since it addresses a smaller footprint each pass on your property. A 54" mower deck would do a better job than your 60" for that matter. Because of the nature of the property you described I would think you have a golden opportunity for some additional seat time this fall. Before re seeding, if it were me, I would get some top soil and level those uneven areas, if possible, seed and enjoy that 60 inch deck next season...it's not like you don't have the tools for it! Good luck Bud and be sure to share the project pics if you decide to go that way!

-Lou
 

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Short answer is yes. A narrower deck will pretty much always cut an uneven lawn better than a wider deck. The 60" and 72" decks are great for smooth and flat lawns but if you get into the uneven stuff your likely hood of uneven cuts and scalping goes up. You can cut at a higher HOC to prevent some of the scalping but it won't necessarily help with the uneven cut.

Kind of have a couple options. Live with the cut of the 60" and maybe go with a higher cut. Work on evening out the divots and low areas to get a smoother lawn which will help but may not eliminate all the issues. Or get a smaller deck which means a smaller machine dedicated to mowing.

If it were me I would start with the first two. Try the simplest and least expensive option first.
 

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I am e4xtremely disappointed with the performance of my 1025R and 60D mower on my front lawn. The ground is sloped in every direction, rough with many divots, and there are a couple of low running areas that carry rainwater away from the downspouts. The 60D cuts unevenly being lower on the downhill slope by 1/2-3/4". I also get a little scalping.

My question is, will a smaller, say a 42" D-Series, help with my problem or will it have the same issues?

My 21" Honda push mower does a wonderful job, but after using a 60" swath, the 21" by hand has become excruciating. Yes I have become lazy....

There have been allot of guys that have had issues with their 60D decks. I have one, rechecked all the adjustments step by step from the manual and mine cuts fine. One thing you do have to watch. These decks do not lift very high when full raised. I found you must drop the gauge wheels all that way down and then adjust your deck height so the wheels do not touch the ground. It is easy to get these decks too low.
 

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Another possibility is to lower the gauge wheels on the mower deck further. I know that the book says to avoid putting the weight of the mower on the wheels. However, worst case, you wear out the wheels earlier.
My dad runs his mower deck wheels on the ground, knowing that he will eventually have to replace them.
This seems to help with the scalping.
 

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Another possibility is to lower the gauge wheels on the mower deck further. I know that the book says to avoid putting the weight of the mower on the wheels. However, worst case, you wear out the wheels earlier.
My dad runs his mower deck wheels on the ground, knowing that he will eventually have to replace them.
This seems to help with the scalping.
My views on mower decks:
A "floating" deck is perfect for level ground
Scalping has nothing to do with the width of the mower
Contact gauge wheels are necessary on slopes.

I progressed from 42" to 60" to 72" cut decks over a 20 year period of mowing.

The end result of my experience is that the 72" deck scalps the least.

The deck does have 4 perfectly positioned full contact gauge wheels,,,



I do not have a flat spot on my property,,,
and I have not "upgraded" to a JD mower because I refuse to deal with another floating deck.

Got Slopes?? :dunno:

 

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I owned a 60" deck for apx 18 mo., worst experience I have ever had . I always had 54" and thought it would be better and quicker. ON level 60" does a great job not on a slope.

Between me and the shop foreman , lower the gauge wheels to within 1/8" or less to the ground. mower will do OK

Yes a 42 will do a very nice job, then a little less with a 48 then to a 54" A 54 for me has always mowed very nice.

Wish you luck
 

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The deck will float from side to side when mowing on slopes. The deck will shift up to 1" to the downhill side depending on the model. This shift causes the downhill side to mow lower than the uphill side causing the unevenness you're describing. This shift can be minimized by shimming the draft arms at the chassis brackets with washers. You can also drill and pin the front draft bracket to reduce side to side deck shifting. Use a 3/16" spring hitch pin through the draft arm to limit side to side shifting of the deck.





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The deck will float from side to side when mowing on slopes. The deck will shift up to 1" to the downhill side depending on the model. This shift causes the downhill side to mow lower than the uphill side causing the unevenness you're describing. This shift can be minimized by shimming the draft arms at the chassis brackets with washers. You can also drill and pin the front draft bracket to reduce side to side deck shifting. Use a 3/16" spring hitch pin through the draft arm to limit side to side shifting of the deck.





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When I had my 60" Deere, had the shop foreman replace the front lift arms PINS with Nut and Bolt with a washer to help minimized .. May have helped a very little bit. Wasn't enough to satisfy me or the shop foreman.
Anyone can try , but nothing seemed to help !:dunno: except for lowering the gauge wheels so they either touched a level surface or having them no more than a 1/4" off the surface.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I have tried "super" lowering my wheels using the retention pin hole. This has just caused gouging by the wheels. There is not enough float left on the 1025R when cutting at the higher levels.

I think I'll skip the lawn tractor. I will probably have the same issues, though probably better, with the larger floating deck. I'll just chalk the push mower up to needing the exercise....

The comments on getting the yard leveled out are good ones. Going to have to see what it will take. Thanks.
 

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There have been allot of guys that have had issues with their 60D decks. I have one, rechecked all the adjustments step by step from the manual and mine cuts fine. One thing you do have to watch. These decks do not lift very high when full raised. I found you must drop the gauge wheels all that way down and then adjust your deck height so the wheels do not touch the ground. It is easy to get these decks too low.
Somewhere on GTT I have a picture of my 60" deck in the lock position with the height gauge showing just shy of 5". I usually mow 2, 3, or 4 notches down from lock depending on season. Three notches down is between 3 1/4 and 3 1/2" high. I guess I'm confused about the don't lift very high?
 

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Rear Mount Finish Mower....

DSC03075.JPG

Mine does not have an anti-scalp roller in the middle, but it could be added. Other models do have anti-scalp rollers.

I just have to be careful not to straddle anything with a high crown.
 

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I had a 318 with the 46" deck and it was all but riding on the mower deck wheels. When I got my 60" deck and 1026R I had all sorts of issues with scalping and low cutting the downhill side. Something to think about and this came to me after a while reading and looking at the situation. The deck has a HUGE surface area. Think about cutting a piece of plywood the same shape as your 60D deck. Can you picture how poorly it would contour your yard? Look at how big the blades are. There is no flex in that deck. So one side might be on the ground and the other may be 4" high if you have a high spot in your yard. I dealt with this problem in 3 ways.

1. Fix my yard. I got a tiller and started moving all the topsoil of the high spots to the low spots. Lots of grading. Made my yard look better in the process.

2. Gauge wheels all the way down. My wheels almost touch in the garage so in the grass they work A LOT. Every couple weeks I like to pull the pins and grease them because I know the wheels work hard.

3. Direction of attack. If you play around with your mowing style to help keep yourself our of situations that can cause the deck contour issues you are doing yourself a HUGE favor.

The 1 Series is at heart a tractor that can mow. It does a great job, but I believe many people put it in a situation where it has no choice, but to fail. You wouldn't put a Tahoe up against a Prius in a fuel consumption comparison would you? In a way expecting a 1 Series to mow like a lawn tractor is the same thing. IMO anyway. With the 1 Series you get a TON of capability and with that you get some additional size. It'll do the job and do it well, you just have to adjust a few things and give it a fair chance.


-636
 

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Simplicity tractors have a deck that follows the ground. They hook to the back of the front axle in front & have a long roller that rides on the ground in the back. Wondering if they are any better in the rough stuff?
 

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The deck will float from side to side when mowing on slopes. The deck will shift up to 1" to the downhill side depending on the model. This shift causes the downhill side to mow lower than the uphill side causing the unevenness you're describing. This shift can be minimized by shimming the draft arms at the chassis brackets with washers. You can also drill and pin the front draft arm at the bracket to reduce side to side deck shifting. Use a 3/16" spring hitch pin through the draft arm to limit side to side shifting of the deck.
Here's a photo that shows how I pinned the front draft arm and reduced the side to side deck shift on my 60D 7 Iron deck. I also shimmed the rear draft arms with washers at the deck frame brackets. This greatly reduced the uneven cut issue I experienced on slopes.

2014-06-06 12.45.20.jpg
 

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Here's a photo that shows how I pinned the front draft arm and reduced the side to side deck shift on my 60D 7 Iron deck. I also shimmed the rear draft arms with washers at the deck frame brackets. This greatly reduced the uneven cut issue I experienced on slopes.

View attachment 158826
Hmmm my front draft link looks nothing like that. It has very little, if any, side movement from what I recall. I'll have to check to be sure though.
 

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Hmmm my front draft link looks nothing like that. It has very little, if any, side movement from what I recall. I'll have to check to be sure though.
It's obviously different if you have an auto-connecting deck. In my case the 60D 7 Iron non auto-connecting deck was shifting side to side on slopes due to the significant weight of the unit. My strategy was to limit the shifting which was almost two full inches. Anything that you can do to limit the deck from shifting will keep it leveled as adjusted. Keep in mind that the side to side movement can occur at other attaching points as well.
 
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