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Discussion Starter #1
Brand new 1025R. So far - just taken a few test drives around the property. I'm wondering if anyone on these forums has a similar issue that I've noticed. I'm handicapped, disabled vet. Lifting my left leg in a seated position is difficult. The pad on the brake pedal is too high. Has anyone come up with a solution to lower the pedal? I plan to get some measurements of where it needs to be, remove it and take it to a machine shop for the mod. It looks like its two bolts where it mounts to the shaft - pretty straight forward. Just wondering if anyone else has already tackled this and can share what you learned, pros/cons, etc. - or if anyone has an opinion. I just need to lower the pad about 3 or four inches - would make a world of difference. Thanks in advance.
 

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I've not read or seen anyone doing that, but I think you'll find as you learn to use the tractor more that you will hardly ever need the brakes as the hydrostatic transmission does an incredible job controlling the speed of the machine, especially in the L range.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I've not read or seen anyone doing that, but I think you'll find as you learn to use the tractor more that you will hardly ever need the brakes as the hydrostatic transmission does an incredible job controlling the speed of the machine, especially in the L range.
Most excellent. I'll drive it some more today and continue to get familiar with it. Thank you.
 

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'20 1025R, 120R, 54D
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I've not read or seen anyone doing that, but I think you'll find as you learn to use the tractor more that you will hardly ever need the brakes as the hydrostatic transmission does an incredible job controlling the speed of the machine, especially in the L range.
While this is true, don't forget the parking brake. That will likely still be needed so the pedal mod probably is still a good thing to do.

Keep in mind that a shorter pedal will require a bit more force to push as well.
 

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While this is true, don't forget the parking brake. That will likely still be needed so the pedal mod probably is still a good thing to do.

Keep in mind that a shorter pedal will require a bit more force to push as well.
Good point - that might make it worse for me actually. I'll get it on some down slopes today and see just how much I need the brakes. May not be as big a problem as I'm thinking.
 

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Personally, I find the brake pedal position uncomfortable as well. I have a 36" inseam, which means long legs and the pedal is just too high and in a place where I have to draw my leg back to lift it to push the brake pedal. Really, the only time I use the brake pedal is to engage and disengage the parking brake, but I do that every time I park the tractor (out of habit).

I can tell you rarely have I used the brake pedal to stop this or any of my hydrostatic machines.....but it would still be preferred to have the pedal comfortable in case I needed to stop the machine...........

There are a few things which would benefit from some modification.

  • Lower / shorter brake pedal
  • Lower, shorter transfer case lever ( H-N-L)*
  • Raised 2wd / 4wd lever so its not parallel to the operator platform*


*
there are threads on making these changes, use the advanced search feature.

One other thing to consider, if you find yourself on a grade and need to stop, you can lower the FEL bucket and or the rear 3ph balalst to also stop the machine. That's why its a good idea to carry the FEL bucket in the rolled up position so that if you did have to use the FEL to make an emergency stop, you want the rounded part of the bucket to make the contact with the ground. You don't want the leading edge of the bucket to dig in and make the stop violent and dangerous.
 

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If you have some nice steep hills to test on -

Get going slowly down a hill and let off the forward go pedal. When on the level or a slight downgrade the tractor should just stop on its own. But on a steeper slope it may slow down a lot but not completely stop. In this case just ease on the reverse pedal until you stop.

A couple times of practice and you’ll get the confidence to never have to use the brake when moving.

However it is important to get into the habit of using the parking brake each time you dismount. For this you may need to modify the pedal. But maybe you can do what I do when my RA is acting up and lift your leg with your hands to place your foot on the pedal.
 

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Like others have said, I rarely use mine. In fact when I saw the heading for this post, I had to think for a few seconds if I even had a brake pedal! Then I recalled that it's the thing that I step on out of habit, when I start the tractor. Just like I need to step on the break pedal in my truck when I hit the push button to start it.

@SMSgtMCC , thank you for your service and your sacrifice for our nation.
 

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Brand new 1025R. So far - just taken a few test drives around the property. I'm wondering if anyone on these forums has a similar issue that I've noticed. I'm handicapped, disabled vet. Lifting my left leg in a seated position is difficult. The pad on the brake pedal is too high. Has anyone come up with a solution to lower the pedal? I plan to get some measurements of where it needs to be, remove it and take it to a machine shop for the mod. It looks like its two bolts where it mounts to the shaft - pretty straight forward. Just wondering if anyone else has already tackled this and can share what you learned, pros/cons, etc. - or if anyone has an opinion. I just need to lower the pad about 3 or four inches - would make a world of difference. Thanks in advance.
I am a Disabled Vet to and bilateral amputee. I have a hard time with the brake pedal too. Especially when engaging the parking brake. I have needed the brakes now and again on a slope when I couldnt drop the bucket becaus it was already down and I was on ice.

It is something I have just gotten used to for now. A electric parking brake would be great. With the switch up higher on the dash soI couldn't hit it with my knee. I bang the light switch everytime I get off the rig. Doesn't matter what I do. I am going to have someone rewire and move it. I don't like how I have to have every light on when I use the lights.

Seems like I need the brakes now more than I did before I lost my legs.

Thank you for your service!

Good luck!
WB 🚜🇺🇲
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I am a Disabled Vet to and bilateral amputee. I have a hard time with the brake pedal too. Especially when engaging the parking brake. I have needed the brakes now and again on a slope when I couldnt drop the bucket becaus it was already down and I was on ice.

It is something I have just gotten used to for now. A electric parking brake would be great. With the switch up higher on the dash soI couldn't hit it with my knee. I bang the light switch everytime I get off the rig. Doesn't matter what I do. I am going to have someone rewire and move it. I don't like how I have to have every light on when I use the lights.

Seems like I need the brakes now more than I did before I lost my legs.

Thank you for your service!

Good luck!
WB 🚜🇺🇲
Thank you for YOUR service too! God bless!
 

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Deere's parking brake pedals feel like highway pegs on my Road Sofa. My least loved farkle. I cannot imagine being an amputee and trying to use it regularly though it would certainly result in huge leg muscles.
 

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A different idea, instead of changing the brake pedal, add a 3 inch foot support to the deck pad. (to raise your foot) It would only need to go to your heel from the pedal. I don't know if that would work but it doesn't require any modifications to the brakes.
Try a temporary block of wood (2x6x 6 inch long) or something similar. Just strap it on or tie it on.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
A different idea, instead of changing the brake pedal, add a 3 inch foot support to the deck pad. (to raise your foot) It would only need to go to your heel from the pedal. I don't know if that would work but it doesn't require any modifications to the brakes.
Try a temporary block of wood (2x6x 6 inch long) or something similar. Just strap it on or tie it on.
I like it!
 

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I agree with many that the hydro is great at controlling speed.
BUT
If you put the tractor in neutral for some reason, it rolls.. super freely. You need to be able to use the brake quickly.
And/or
If you are mowing down hill (or using any other implement that uses the PTO) and even touch the Reverse pedal and you have not actuated (or disabled) the RIO, the engine will quit. When the engine quits, the trans will only slightly slow the tractor, and it will roll forward uncontrollably(and steering power is greatly reduced). The brake is the only thing to stop it.

Placing the pedal lower on it's stalk will reduce the amount of force applied...not sure you want that.

I really do like the idea of raising the floor, or placing some kind of block to rest your heel on... sounds like the best and simplest solution.

As others have said, thank you so much for your service to this great country we live in. The freedoms enjoy, have been secured by brave men like yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I agree with many that the hydro is great at controlling speed.
BUT
If you put the tractor in neutral for some reason, it rolls.. super freely. You need to be able to use the brake quickly.
And/or
If you are mowing down hill (or using any other implement that uses the PTO) and even touch the Reverse pedal and you have not actuated (or disabled) the RIO, the engine will quit. When the engine quits, the trans will only slightly slow the tractor, and it will roll forward uncontrollably(and steering power is greatly reduced). The brake is the only thing to stop it.

Placing the pedal lower on it's stalk will reduce the amount of force applied...not sure you want that.

I really do like the idea of raising the floor, or placing some kind of block to rest your heel on... sounds like the best and simplest solution.

As others have said, thank you so much for your service to this great country we live in. The freedoms enjoy, have been secured by brave men like yourself.
That's great info. and that's why I wanted to get as much info. as I could here. I can certainly temporarily clamp a block on and try it. It'd be super easy to affix one without modifying the tractor and it would keep things safe. It makes sense that shortening it would require more force to operate. My Mahindra that I just sold didn't have a neutral and was a much different beast. But the 1025R makes life much easier in so many ways. I've got plenty of time before mowing season to get this ironed out. Thanks everyone!
 

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The parking break is awkward even with fairly normal legs. It is very stiff and would only be worse if the arm was shortened. The moment arm would be that much greater. I haven't looked yet but maybe a softer spring would help.

rob
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The parking break is awkward even with fairly normal legs. It is very stiff and would only be worse if the arm was shortened. The moment arm would be that much greater. I haven't looked yet but maybe a softer spring would help.

rob
Thanks!
 

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The parking brake is deliberately designed to be a little difficult to use. The goal is to keep children who are playing on the tractor from disengaging it. "You must be this tall to take this ride."

Keane
 

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Discussion Starter #19
The parking brake is deliberately designed to be a little difficult to use. The goal is to keep children who are playing on the tractor from disengaging it. "You must be this tall to take this ride."

Keane
Makes good sense.
 

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Another thing the brake pedal does is activate the diff-lock when pressed a little way down, before the single axle wet disc brake engages. That locks both rear axles together so both rear tires are braking when you fully depress the pedal. You can use the brake pedal to engage the diff-lock without needing to use the tiny lever with your heel.
 
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