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I'm chomping at the bit to get my new machine and get to work, but are there any recommended practices for break-in of a new 1025R I should be aware of before I unleash the Deeres of War upon my yard?
 

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sstlaure, Some reading for you while you wait. Maybe you have seen this already but what the heck.

OMLVU25849
 
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^^^^Great posts^^^^^

Check your fluids, warm it up for a few minutes, and get her dirty. Try to vary the rpm in the first 10 hours of operation. Do not stay at the same rpm for extended periods. Don't baby it. Work it! :thumbup1gif:
 

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^^^^Great posts^^^^^

Check your fluids, warm it up for a few minutes, and get her dirty. Try to vary the rpm in the first 10 hours of operation. Do not stay at the same rpm for extended periods. Don't baby it. Work it! :thumbup1gif:
kiss.gif
Yours wasn't bad either.
 

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Thanks - I'll read them all....

I gotta stop by the dealer to see if I can pre-inspect my manuals so I'm ready to go when I get her.

:greentractorride: :greentractorride: :greentractorride: :greentractorride: :greentractorride:
 

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I believe what I linked is the manual.
 

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Run it like you stole it.......my tractor was delivered with 1.9 hours. I disabled the RIO and started cutting grass running the 60" MMM and pulling the 60" offset mower in 100 degree weather WAO. Now with 78 hours it hasn't burnt the first lick of oil.
 

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I've said this before...

Warm it up and get that baby to work. If you can ...find a long downhill and run it up to full speed and let off the gas...errr diesel. This puts back pressure on the rings and will force them into the walls of the cylinder. The first couple of hours of an engines life, the crosshatch is still rough and not polished over. This is the best time to get those rings seated fully. If you baby it, the rings will take a lot longer to seat and may never fully seat. Also, heat cycles matter too...so get the engine fully warmed up doing this procedure, let it cool down....do it again a couple of more times...and then run it like you stole it. There have been studies done (i cant remember the source, but I believe it was Hot Rod mag) that have proven an engine broken in like this will have longer life and make more power as well.

They had dyno charts and pictures of two torn down identical engines to show the results of engines babied vs the procedure above. It was pretty revealing
 

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Gizmo's link is your manual. You'll like being able to click right where you want to read. :good2:
I've always been a paper guy (doesn't need a cord and convenient for reading in the.....err....library)

I will be reading this electronic version ahead of delivery - thanks!
 
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I've said this before...

Warm it up and get that baby to work. If you can ...find a long downhill and run it up to full speed and let off the gas...errr diesel. This puts back pressure on the rings and will force them into the walls of the cylinder. The first couple of hours of an engines life, the crosshatch is still rough and not polished over. This is the best time to get those rings seated fully. If you baby it, the rings will take a lot longer to seat and may never fully seat. Also, heat cycles matter too...so get the engine fully warmed up doing this procedure, let it cool down....do it again a couple of more times...and then run it like you stole it. There have been studies done (i cant remember the source, but I believe it was Hot Rod mag) that have proven an engine broken in like this will have longer life and make more power as well.

They had dyno charts and pictures of two torn down identical engines to show the results of engines babied vs the procedure above. It was pretty revealing
I don't believe running down hill and letting off the hydro pedal has the same effect that you describe. My drive is pretty steep and if I go down it, let off the hydro pedal, I have a better chance of the tires skidding than I do of the RPMs rising.
 

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I've said this before...

Warm it up and get that baby to work. If you can ...find a long downhill and run it up to full speed and let off the gas...errr diesel. This puts back pressure on the rings and will force them into the walls of the cylinder. The first couple of hours of an engines life, the crosshatch is still rough and not polished over. This is the best time to get those rings seated fully. If you baby it, the rings will take a lot longer to seat and may never fully seat. Also, heat cycles matter too...so get the engine fully warmed up doing this procedure, let it cool down....do it again a couple of more times...and then run it like you stole it. There have been studies done (i cant remember the source, but I believe it was Hot Rod mag) that have proven an engine broken in like this will have longer life and make more power as well.

They had dyno charts and pictures of two torn down identical engines to show the results of engines babied vs the procedure above. It was pretty revealing
Good post rgd. You don't see that written very often.
Engine will also use less or no oil.
 

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Also get a couple 5 gallon cans of Diesel full on hand. You just might need it.:greentractorride:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Also get a couple 5 gallon cans of Diesel full on hand. You just might need it.:greentractorride:
Already bought the new yellow cans.....
 

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I don't believe running down hill and letting off the hydro pedal has the same effect that you describe. My drive is pretty steep and if I go down it, let off the hydro pedal, I have a better chance of the tires skidding than I do of the RPMs rising.
I think I didn't explain that very well. Your right.... Letting off of the hydro pedal will do what you describe. If you get the engine going at close to full revs on a downhill , in high gear,then close the throttle you will get some back pressure from engine / compression braking. The downhill recommendation is to help extend the compression braking time. It won't be as good as say a gas engine on a long downhill, since the greater compression ratio will slow the engine quicker. But it will create a difference in crankcase pressure that will force the rings outward. Albeit in shorter durations It still helps with seating the rings faster. This info was taken from a well known engine builder. I will google it tonight and see if I can find a link. It was good reading.
 

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I think I didn't explain that very well. Your right.... Letting off of the hydro pedal will do what you describe. If you get the engine going at close to full revs on a downhill , in high gear,then close the throttle you will get some back pressure from engine / compression braking. The downhill recommendation is to help extend the compression braking time. It won't be as good as say a gas engine on a long downhill, since the greater compression ratio will slow the engine quicker. But it will create a difference in crankcase pressure that will force the rings outward. Albeit in shorter durations It still helps with seating the rings faster. This info was taken from a well known engine builder. I will google it tonight and see if I can find a link. It was good reading.
This has been rolling around in my head for awhile. I don't think I can agree with your statement...:unknown:

Diesels aren't air throttled like a gas motor. There's no butterfly valve in the intake so the engine gets a full charge of air on every intake stroke. So diesels don't make vacuum at closed "throttle" positions therefore there's not much of any engine braking that a gas motor has. Creating a vacuum in the intake manifold is work. That resistance to turn is the work. Diesel engines just freewheel because there's no vacuum created. The higher compression just causes more resistance on the compression cycle but most of that energy is returned by the air expanding and pushing the piston back down on the power stroke, even if there's no fuel to add to the push. So higher compression doesn't help with engine braking. On a diesel you generally have to have a exhaust brake or a "jake" brake to provide any engine braking effect.

A hydrostat tranmission will just stop the flow of hydro fluid and not "backfeed" any energy from the wheels to the engine. You can't really coast in a hydro either. You can unload it by matching ground speed with pedal position, but it won't backfeed energy and let you truly coast. Try it. You can't get the engine rpm's up at all other than with throttle position.

I hope I explained it well enough to make sense....
 

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Just like breaking in a new truck or car, where you get on the highway, as well as drive in town, for best results....Run at different RPMs, and use it for different things, under different conditions. That will help everything "seat" correctly. Enjoy it, and USE it!!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I've broken in plenty of 4-stroke IC engines, just my first diesel. Thanks everybody:thumbup1gif:
 

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I've broken in plenty of 4-stroke IC engines, just my first diesel. Thanks everybody:thumbup1gif:
Tell the dealer to send it over here for a week or two, or three or...................... I'll break it in for ya. Again, just the type of guy I am.:thumbup1gif:
 
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