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Dealer told me to refer to my manual, but I can’t find any literature in it concerning break in. You guys probably have gone through this 175 times, and I can’t figure out the search feature on the forums here because I’m retarded, so...discuss pleeeeeez. I already put 4 hrs on it
 

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Dealer told me to refer to my manual, but I can’t find any literature in it concerning break in. You guys probably have gone through this 175 times, and I can’t figure out the search feature on the forums here because I’m retarded, so...discuss pleeeeeez. I already put 4 hrs on it
The only break in I know of, and which is a subject that has been debated about on here many times. Is whether the Yanmar engine uses break in oil. Nobody seems to know for sure. The manual used to say change the engine oil at 50 hours. Now it says change at 200. Same engine, different date of purchase. It could take several years to hit 200 hours and that just doesn't set well in owners minds. So the debate is, if you change the oil early, should you be putting break in oil back in or not? So far as I know, nobody has been able to document anything conclusive about what to do, except follow what is in the manuals they got, in the year they bought their tractor. I just turned 50 hours on mine. I've just been using it normally from day one and haven't worried about what speeds or time running. I was thinking about splitting the difference. Like changing the oil at 100 hours.
 

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If I remember right my 2016 1025 said change hydro fluid and filter screen at 50 and oil around 100. I believe a lot of us did both around the 50 mark. Now my new 2025 and i believe new 1025 say 200 hours like mentioned.

I’m going with my Manual becuase im lazy lol. If i feel like doing it early or i felt i was really rough on it I will do it sooner. I know it won’t hurt to do it sooner.
 

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Do you mean engine break in :dunno:

According to the manual you are supposed to vary RPMs for the first so many hours (I think like 25). Both of my tractors went straight to work right from delivery. Old school diesel mentality is run them the way you will be using them.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes engine break in. Nothing In manual about variable rpms


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Thought I remembered seeing in my 1023 manual. Doesn’t matter, run it like you’re going to use it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
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Just talked to the service manager at the dealer. He said go ahead and run it as long as I put load on the higher rpm’s. Basically not to run it full throttle unless it’s under load. No joyriding around or sitting there wide open until the first oil change. Which is like 100-200 hrs. I forgot but don’t have my manual w me. Actually he was more concerned about retorquing the lug nuts and loader bolts at 10 hrs because they tend to loosen up


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In my opinion, modern engines don't really require "break in" anymore. There used to be a whole set idea of push-it-hard, slow-it-down on the rpm's to help seat the piston rings. That is no longer valid for automobiles, so I doubt it's different for any other engine. I wouldn't worry about it. What I WOULD do is change your engine oil early on (no later than 50 hours) and change the hydro fluid before 100 hours. Of course, I didn't change my hydro fluid until 250 hours (6 years), so who am I to judge....

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Dealer told me to refer to my manual, but I can’t find any literature in it concerning break in. You guys probably have gone through this 175 times, and I can’t figure out the search feature on the forums here because I’m retarded, so...discuss pleeeeeez. I already put 4 hrs on it
A I always switch to full syn after break in with my tractors and i change it every year even if i don't use them much.
 

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Just talked to the service manager at the dealer. He said go ahead and run it as long as I put load on the higher rpm’s. Basically not to run it full throttle unless it’s under load. No joyriding around or sitting there wide open until the first oil change. Which is like 100-200 hrs. I forgot but don’t have my manual w me. Actually he was more concerned about retorquing the lug nuts and loader bolts at 10 hrs because they tend to loosen up


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He is correct, on both of my tractors I got some turn out the wheel bolts, mainly on the fronts. But after that I’ve never gotten any movement on any of them.
 

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Watching as I will want to know. I do agree on re-torqueing bolts after taking delivery and using it about 5 hours to a little more. Especially if you work the tractor quite well. Things tend to seat and loosen then need that final wrenching to set them.

As to working the engine......makes sense on the hours and to the hydro change.
 

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I will probably enter controversy here but from all my reading I have found that most Diesel engine rebuilders recommend a good load during break in because, yes, even modern engines machined to the highest standards will experience a bed in of the rings to the cylinders, and the sooner and better performed the longer the engine should last and the greater chance of extracting full power.

For me it was simple. I bought the machine when I bought my latest house and I had a couple acres of tall grass to cut.
After many weekends of operating at pto rpm and hearing the engine lug down a little bit when cutting I was satisfied I was not babying it too much.
I kind of doubt that you will have any major issues if you just did almost whatever you wanted and used the machine though.
 

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I will probably enter controversy here but from all my reading I have found that most Diesel engine rebuilders recommend a good load during break in because, yes, even modern engines machined to the highest standards will experience a bed in of the rings to the cylinders, and the sooner and better performed the longer the engine should last and the greater chance of extracting full power.

For me it was simple. I bought the machine when I bought my latest house and I had a couple acres of tall grass to cut.
After many weekends of operating at pto rpm and hearing the engine lug down a little bit when cutting I was satisfied I was not babying it too much.
I kind of doubt that you will have any major issues if you just did almost whatever you wanted and used the machine though.
your right to a point but under a sustained load a NEW tight engine will expand and get even tighter and can do damage. Its good to work the engine and at high rpm and load but for only very short times then as hours are added you can keep it working at high load rpm's longer and longer. If you only run at low speed that is also bad practice on any new engine.

You have the right idea but start off working hard for a very short period then run at lower load for awhile then again and as hours add ///well you get the picture. I have seen more than one negine worked to death in the first few hours if they survive they will likely burn oil and won't develope full power.
 
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