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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was blowing some snow today (JD 47 inch snowblower), and had my 1025R in 'Low Gear' and had my unit in 4X4 mode.

After doing my drive.... I put the tractor into 'High Gear' to drive up the road about 1/8 mile (snow covered road, just plowed after snowstorm) and went up to my neighbors to do his drive.

I got to my neighbors and his drive was already done, so I drove back home and saw a neighbor across the street from me struggling with his 2 stage walk behind blower.... so I started blowing his drive. I forgot to put my gearing selector back into 'LOW' gear and my 1025R was bogging down a bit...and then it got stuck in the snow.

I noticed when trying to rock it out backwards, that my front wheels weren't spinning - AT ALL. I checked my drive selector and it was firmly in 4X4 position.... so I moved it to 2WD and then back to 4WD and it didn't seem like my front wheels had any drive at all.

I then discovered I was in 'HIGH' gearing mode...so put it back into 'LOW' and then eventually got unstuck and finished blowing my neighbors drive.

I am not sure that my 4X4 front axle is working at all, frankly.....

MY QUESTIONS ARE:

  • Does running the tractor in 'HIGH" mode automatically disengage the front 4X4 system?
  • If not... does moving at full speed in 'HIGH" mode with 4X4 engaged harmful?
My neighbor has the same unit and said he has run his in HIGH mode wity 4X4 engaged many times..... not for doing pto work per se, but he said he didn't think there was any harm in doing so.

Anybody have input, suggestions, or feedback regarding my questions highlighted in BOLD ?

Thanks.
 

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Hello. I run mine in High in 4x4 all the time while plowing on asphalt. I drive it up the street to my neighbors when I plow hers and I never take it out. I am plowing with the bucket not a snow blower but I don't see any harm in it. JD would put warning stickers on the tractor or have it in the manual if you couldn't do that. They wouldn't want to be replacing a bunch of axles or gears under warranty.

You said the tractor bogged down? Did you have the throttle up to where it is supposed to be when running the pot? Also wondering which pto selector switch you were in? Not sure it matters?

Last question, how heavy was the snow? I know from using a walk behind one that going to fast in wet heavy snow bogs them down big time and there comes a point where it just isn't worth the effort.

Good luck!
 

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MY QUESTIONS ARE:

  • Does running the tractor in 'HIGH" mode automatically disengage the front 4X4 system?
  • If not... does moving at full speed in 'HIGH" mode with 4X4 engaged harmful?
No and No

What you do NOT want to do is use 4x4 when there is traction. It is for loose/slippery conditions
 

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Running it engaged in 4WD, high or low range, is fine. As suggested, you don't want to operate it in 4WD when on dry, hard surfaces- like concrete or asphalt.
You noticed that your front tires were not spinning- did you notice if your rear tires were? If you were engaged in 4WD, yet the back tires were spinning but the fronts weren't, then there is a problem. 4WD is a 100% mechanical link between the front and rear axle.
What I suspect was happening was that because you were in high range, neither the front or rear tires were spinning. There is an overload valve in the hydraulic system, so if you demand too much (in your case, pushing snow in high range with sufficient traction), the oil will bypass. In low range, there is sufficient gearing advantage, so that you will break traction before activating the bypass valve in the hydraulic system.

Or, it may not have been fully engaged in 4WD- but you had double checked that.
 

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Running it engaged in 4WD, high or low range, is fine. As suggested, you don't want to operate it in 4WD when on dry, hard surfaces- like concrete or asphalt.
You noticed that your front tires were not spinning- did you notice if your rear tires were? If you were engaged in 4WD, yet the back tires were spinning but the fronts weren't, then there is a problem. 4WD is a 100% mechanical link between the front and rear axle.
What I suspect was happening was that because you were in high range, neither the front or rear tires were spinning. There is an overload valve in the hydraulic system, so if you demand too much (in your case, pushing snow in high range with sufficient traction), the oil will bypass. In low range, there is sufficient gearing advantage, so that you will break traction before activating the bypass valve in the hydraulic system.

Or, it may not have been fully engaged in 4WD- but you had double checked that.
Does he have loaded tires? If so, the pressure could be to low, and the rims are spinning inside the tires.
 

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No and No

What you do NOT want to do is use 4x4 when there is traction. It is for loose/hslippery conditions
The 1 series is the same (I think) as the 2 series manual in that it states to use MFWD when doing loader work as well, with no qualifications on surface.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you all for your quick responses.

Phew.... I feel better knowing it was nothing 'I did.'

I do not have loaded tires, but I do use a 'ballast box' with about 700# of sandbags inside as instructed to counter the front end loader/snowblower attachments....as a protective measure against pre-maturely wearing out the front drive gears per the manual.

I wonder if it was indeed the 'oil bypass' thing that the poster above stated? I wonder how I can test the front drive wheels operation without screwing up the front of my unit pushing against something?

I never run 4X4 engaged on dry surfaces..... I have owned a few 4X4 pickups and own a new Jeep Wrangler now.... so that precaution is always in my mind.

Everywhere is slippery right now, or I would be able to do a brief 'dry pavement' test while turning to see if I feel the 'choppy/stepping' that front wheel drive engagement would produce. I don't think a second or two would hurt it. Other than that, I am unsure how to test operation without going to extensive trouble.

I still have 3 or 4 years left on my warranty, so I guess I could always have the dealer pick it up and look into it..... just don't want to do that unnecessarily.
 

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I still have 3 or 4 years left on my warranty, so I guess I could always have the dealer pick it up and look into it..... just don't want to do that unnecessarily.
If the machine is under warranty STOP RIGHT THERE. If you've checked the fluids and ensured that your moving the correct levers then there is likely something wrong with the tractor. Have it serviced under warranty before any further damage occurs.
 

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Isn't there a shear pin on the front driveshaft & axle connection? Driving 1/4 of a mile on asphalt in high range with the weight of a snow blower on the front wheels will put a lot of stress on the 4x4 drive train. Something could have broken.
 

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Before I went and paid for delivery charges to take the tractor in and bring it back, I would try a couple things. I know it’s muddy here, and looks like its muddy in a lot of places. Find you a muddy place, put it in four wheel drive, low gear, and stick your bucket in the ground. Hit the gas, see if those front wheels will spin. If it’s muddy, shouldn’t be hard. If all you have is asphalt, put it in four low and drive straight. You should feel the ratcheting effect of these tractors. I know I can feel if I left mine in real quick. Try those first before you haul your tractor off.
 

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Think I would see if the rears were spinning and the fronts not first. On my hills just mowing I can't use high gear. It feels like it's working the hyd. to hard and doesn't want to climb the hills very good. Even in high I can't get to the top of the hill any faster then if I was in low. That's how much pressure I have to put on the foot feed to get it to go up hill in high. The pressure on the foot feed is also harder going up hill in high. I put it in low and the pressure goes away and I can go faster. I don't think I could spin any of the tires in high, going up hill.
 

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The 1 series is the same (I think) as the 2 series manual in that it states to use MFWD when doing loader work as well, with no qualifications on surface.
To be very specific. The reason you do not use WFWD on high traction surfaces is it can bind and break the drive components.

As per the 1025r manual

IMPORTANT: Avoid Damage! Always disengage MFWD when drivingon a paved surface.[SUB][SUP]
[/SUP][/SUB]
 

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To be very specific. The reason you do not use WFWD on high traction surfaces is it can bind and break the drive components.

As per the 1025r manual

IMPORTANT: Avoid Damage! Always disengage MFWD when drivingon a paved surface.[SUB][SUP]
[/SUP][/SUB]
Agreed, the 2032r manual states much the same-perhaps I should have been more specific myself in that the Loader manual H130 & H120 for the 1 series) states in section 35 Operate Loader
“•If tractor is equipped with 4-WD, be sure that it is engaging during loader operation”

Now I realize that this in seeming contradiction to the machine manual but the loader and it’s operation presents specific conditions that are not completely applicable to standard tractor operations without the loader, so for the specific nature of loader work the respective loader manual should take precedence IMHO.
 

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Yes that is what a flat (under inflated) tire will do. An inflated tire won't. Pretty easy to check air pressure and put more air in it. That would eliminate the wheel spinning in the tire. If you have fluid in the tires with no tube you will see fluid on the tire if the wheel spins in the tire. Another tell tale.
 

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To be very specific. The reason you do not use WFWD on high traction surfaces is it can bind and break the drive components.

As per the 1025r manual

IMPORTANT: Avoid Damage! Always disengage MFWD when drivingon a paved surface.[SUB][SUP]
[/SUP][/SUB]
Good rule of thumb. Use the WFWD when necessary. Other wise use 2 wheel drive. Driving down the road at high speed is not good to be in 4X. Heavy loader work is where the front drive comes in handy. Most snow operations take 4 wheel duty. Most mowing operations take 2 wheel duty. When doing heavy loader work, the more weight you have hung on the back the more stress you put on the front drive. If you have 700 lbs hung on the back and are lifting 700 lbs with the loader these is a lot of stress n the front drive. The 1025R is really not designed to to loader work with 700 lbs. 200-300 lbs is much more in its work range.
 

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To be very specific. The reason you do not use WFWD on high traction surfaces is it can bind and break the drive components.


The OP stated in the opening statement that he was driving on a snow covered road. Pavement or not I don't think that qualifies for a high traction surface.

 

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He either overloaded the hydro in high hear and no tires were spinning, or the rims slipped in the tires, I have seen this happen with underinflated tires.

There is no way he "broke" the front axle, they're overbuilt on these little machines. The practice of not using fwd on dry surfaces is to avoid premature component wear (u-joints).
 
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