Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a stupid question, I have an engine block heater on my 1025R. Besides plugging it in, how does it technically work, can it be plugged in all the time in a cold garage, does it heat to a specific temperature and shut off or does it continue to heat. Is it reliable, as in risk of fire over time. etc. etc. I got no info with it. This is the block heater not a dipstick type. Factory John deere. I know it heats the coolant but does it have a max temperature?
Thanks:unknown:
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,852 Posts
Think of your block heater like the water heater in your home. It's an electric heater element with no thermostat though. It will continue to heat as long as it's connected to power. A properly sized heater won't overheat your block in cold weather. Worse case scenario the tractor's thermostat will open and the radiator will dissipate any extra heat. That's inefficient of course, but it does work. The best thing you can do is plug it in a few hours before you plan on using it. If that's not convenient, use a thermostatic outlet designed for block heaters. They turn on at a set ambient air temp such as 35* and lower, some have a adjustable thermostat. You could also use a timer. I've seen people wire up the outlet they use for the block heater on a switch located in a convenient spot inside their home. It's not advisable to leave it plugeed in for hours and hours, let alone days on end. Not only is that a huge waste of electricity (and a huge power bill), you risk burning up the element in warmer weather.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I guess, what I am looking for is this thing to be ready without a 2 hour warmup. Does it actually take that long? If I use a theromostatic outlet it would heat all the time if my garage is under the set temp. I was actually hoping it would shutoff once it hit a certain temperature. Thanks
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,852 Posts
I guess, what I am looking for is this thing to be ready without a 2 hour warmup. Does it actually take that long? If I use a theromostatic outlet it would heat all the time if my garage is under the set temp. I was actually hoping it would shutoff once it hit a certain temperature. Thanks
A timer and and a thermostatic outlet working in combo may work good for you. That way only the days/times you set would the thermostat work, and only if it was cold enough would the block heater come on.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,287 Posts
When I was commuting with my diesel truck, I just used a timer and had it set for 3 hours before I needed to leave for work. Now with a tractor, especially used for snow removal your often going to need it at different times. There are new WiFi timers that would work great, you could turn on the heater from a smartphone when you leave work for example. The problem I see with the thermostatic outlet is that just because its cold doesn't mean your going to use the tractor, so you'd be wasting electricity.

WeMo® Light Switch
 
  • Like
Reactions: ColonyPark

·
Corndog Hater
Joined
·
11,774 Posts
Thanks for asking this screamineagle! I have never had a block heater or needed one for that matter. But in light of my recent starting and smoking issues, I have thought getting one might not be a bad idea. My dealer says, it's not necessary, but necessary and handy are 2 different things. My garage is detached and unheated, so it would be most useful in the AM. I know I would not be getting up early to go plug it in, so kennyd's and dieselshadow's suggestions are great!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
My low tech solution to using the blockheater:

If there is enough snow to fire up the tractor, there is unfortunately, plenty of shoveling that needs to be done.

I plug in the blockheater, and by the time I have the house front and back doors, walkways, and tractor shed doors shoveled, the blockheater has done it's job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,554 Posts
My low tech solution to using the blockheater:

If there is enough snow to fire up the tractor, there is unfortunately, plenty of shoveling that needs to be done.

I plug in the blockheater, and by the time I have the house front and back doors, walkways, and tractor shed doors shoveled, the blockheater has done it's job.[/QUOTE]

I ain't braggin' (much), but I do all that with the tractor! As Gravely used to say in their ads, "Power vs. Drudgery"!:laugh:

The way my place is laid out the original owner must have known something about powered snow removal. All the access is 100% plowable.:thumbup1gif:
 
  • Like
Reactions: ColonyPark

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
I use the block heaters on my Diesel trucks religiously. Makes starting so much easier, since I work in Emergency Management my trucks are usually plugged in all the time. I use a product called an "EasyHeat" it is a little yellow block that you plug in and it operates at the proper temperatures.

31nQYp-Y87L.jpg
http://smile.amazon.com/Easy-Heat-EH-38-Thermostatically-Controlled/dp/B0000DGA8P/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1416934250&sr=8-7&keywords=easy+heat+cable&pebp=1416934253894

They are inexpensive and work great.

There is also an Arduino based project I stumbled onto last year and can not find now that used two temperature probes and timers to turn a block heater on and off dependent upon the temperature differentials. It was ingenious idea created by some guy tired of burning electricity constantly. I think it was set for like one hour on and three off if it was 40-50°F, one hour on two off at 30-40°F, and so forth. Plus it was also able to boost a cold block and if the block was at a certain temp already it wouldn't turn it on at all till it dropped below.

I need to seriously find that program again and build a couple.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top