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Ok...so as many of you know I've been digging a sizeable hole by hand for my amateur radio antenna. What I've noticed the past 2 times I've hooked the front end loader up is that when I go to put it away, I have hydraulic fluid dripping from one of the connectors onto my mower deck......Not sure what to check here. Any idea on what causes these to leak? I usually keep the little rubber caps on both ends of the cables when not in use, but do know some small debris has to be getting in there......
 

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Following - have the exact same problem. Also have oil leaking out of the hose ends attached to the FEL after disconnecting an leaving them draped over the FEL making a small (4-6”) stain on the gravel


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Most hydraulic shops can replace the two parts of the quick-disconnect connectors at the point they are leaking . . .

You will lose about 1 1/2 to 2 inches of hydraulic line . . . is you existing line long enough

If you have a trailer you can bring your tractor to your hydraulic shop and they can see what you want to do . . . I did this on an old machine years ago and it worked
 

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Ok...so as many of you know I've been digging a sizeable hole by hand for my amateur radio antenna. What I've noticed the past 2 times I've hooked the front end loader up is that when I go to put it away, I have hydraulic fluid dripping from one of the connectors onto my mower deck......Not sure what to check here. Any idea on what causes these to leak? I usually keep the little rubber caps on both ends of the cables when not in use, but do know some small debris has to be getting in there......
If you connect and disconnect often, and if you are obliged to tap the fitting to release the pressure in the hose it can result in tiny damage to the mating edges which can cause a leak

The little caps will keep the connectors relatively clean but not stop leaks.

I clean with a clean rag and wash the connectors with clean oil before assembling
 

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Once they start leaking, replacement is the best option. Since the threaded connection is ORB rather than the common NPT, the dealer is the best place to get them.
 

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I thought Ken's Bolt on Hooks was the best place to get stuff:dunno: :laugh:
 

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I thought Ken's Bolt on Hooks was the best place to get stuff:dunno: :laugh:
Normally, it is LOL. But these QD’s are hard to get and I couldn’t sell them for much less than JD does so I don’t carry them.
 

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Anyone have a guide/instructions on how to remove/replace the male ones on the hoses as well as the female ones on the tractor? Should you replace both or just the males or female ends?


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As far as replacing both or just the leaking one, I believe I've heard people just replace the leaking one. They're not a machined pair.

The male ones should just unscrew. Relieve the pressure first by covering the end with a thick rag and push the tip against the frame or the ground. Use line wrenches if possible. If there's an adaptor (#7) between the coupler (#8) and the hose end, don't take the adaptor off. There shouldn't be a replaceable o-ring behind the coupler but there is behind the adaptor.

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The female coupler shows an o-ring between it and the pipe end (#3). I'd get one of those and replace it at the same time. They also show a snap ring (#14) on the back side of the bracket holding the 4 couplers. I believe you have to take that off to get the coupler off. IIRC I read a post before where they changed the female coupler and it was pretty easy.

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As far as replacing both or just the leaking one, I believe I've heard people just replace the leaking one. They're not a machined pair.

The male ones should just unscrew. Relieve the pressure first by covering the end with a thick rag and push the tip against the frame or the ground. Use line wrenches if possible. If there's an adaptor (#7) between the coupler (#8) and the hose end, don't take the adaptor off. There shouldn't be a replaceable o-ring behind the coupler but there is behind the adaptor.





The female coupler shows an o-ring between it and the pipe end (#3). I'd get one of those and replace it at the same time. They also show a snap ring (#14) on the back side of the bracket holding the 4 couplers. I believe you have to take that off to get the coupler off. IIRC I read a post before where they changed the female coupler and it was pretty easy.
I have replaced them on other machines and they are very easy. Once they start to leak, sometimes you can clean out debris and get them to stop, but frankly to clean they properly, you have to remove them and then you don't know if you actually cleaned the debris causing the leak and often they just need replacement.

If you are going to the trouble to remove them to clean them, replace with new and keep the old as spares just in case one is damaged and won't connect. Then, having a dripping spare is better than a damaged one which won't work.

I keep a full set of these in my spare parts box. There is enough failure with these eventually to warrant replacement. The very best way to avoid leaking quick connect fittings is to leave them always connected.

The big farm box stores sell these if you are in a pinch on the holidays or Sundays. They are the 1/4" quick connect hydraulic fittings.

As far as Kenny's parts, he has the very best plugs for keeping the hydraulic fittings clean. They require compression of the sleeve to insert the caps which fit INTO the fittings, not over them like the cheesy one's from Deere. Kenny's plugs have metal chains on them to retain them. I cut the chains off and when I remove the plugs, I put them in the tool box to avoid losing them.

I am sure he knows which plugs I am referring to. Don't waste your time or money replacing the Deere covers, get the actual plugs from Kenny and buy them once and be done. Dirt and debris is what wrecks these fittings. When your male fitting isn't in the female on the tractor, the plugs should be in.
 

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I messed around and killed a lot of time trying to find the right O Ring for a pesky female end that always dribbled on the floor.

Threw in the towel, went to Deere, and got a new female fitting and al has been well sinc

BTW I think the plugs as Kenny has listed are a cut way above the JD answer. I did not put any in the cart. Are they color coded?
 

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I have the o-ring info...but that only helps if the fittings leak while connected.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Mine seems to leak only when connected. Guess it's off to the dealer to get a new set and replace them. Thanks all!

on a side note......got to dig on my hole for a couple of hours this week before the rain set in again......it may be November before I get it done.....lol
 

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Mine seems to leak only when connected.
Then as I stated above, it may be the o-ring. Try sourcing these locally...or someone had a JD part number I think.

Size = 113
Durometer = 70A
Material = Buna N
 

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As far as replacing both or just the leaking one, I believe I've heard people just replace the leaking one. They're not a machined pair.

The male ones should just unscrew. Relieve the pressure first by covering the end with a thick rag and push the tip against the frame or the ground. Use line wrenches if possible. If there's an adaptor (#7) between the coupler (#8) and the hose end, don't take the adaptor off. There shouldn't be a replaceable o-ring behind the coupler but there is behind the adaptor.

View attachment 693764



The female coupler shows an o-ring between it and the pipe end (#3). I'd get one of those and replace it at the same time. They also show a snap ring (#14) on the back side of the bracket holding the 4 couplers. I believe you have to take that off to get the coupler off. IIRC I read a post before where they changed the female coupler and it was pretty easy.

View attachment 693766

I have the same issue with the male end on the loader leaking. Will I lose a lot of fluid when I unscrew the connector?
 

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I have the same issue with the male end on the loader leaking. Will I lose a lot of fluid when I unscrew the connector?
Not if you de pressurize the lines first.

I have a can of WD40 in my toolbox to spray the fitting clean when coupling. Just wiping them off with a rag can lodge small particles in the fitting causing the o rings to fail. Also, wiggling them around when trying to get them “click” is bad for the o rings.
 

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Then as I stated above, it may be the o-ring. Try sourcing these locally...or someone had a JD part number I think.

Size = 113
Durometer = 70A
Material = Buna N
If you keep the tractor where its warm and above 5f see if you can get Viton instead of Buna N ...
 

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I have changed the 'O' rings in the female coupler a couple of times to successfully stop leaks.

Bought a pack of the right sized O ring at the local Fleet Farm, was about 5bucks for 10 of them if my addled brain is working right.

I find that the female coupler gets pretty dirty.
I take it apart and clean it then replace the O ring.
This can be done while the coupler is on the tractor.
 
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