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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just signed the proposal for a 1025r FILB. If I have it shipped here to Hawaii with wheel weights installed, I would save a ton of money. Shipping or buying separately later would be much more expensive. I have never ever driven a tractor before, so I don't know if I will even need them in the volcanic terrain I will be working in.

I never have mud, so traction might not be as big an issue as other places. But I have rocky, somewhat uneven terrain, and am on a slight hill as well.

I don't really want to fill the tires with liquid. First - I don't know how, or if anyone over here in my small town does. And if I ever have to work on the tires, or trailer the tractor to my close-by dealer on my undersized trailer, it would be nice to just remove the weights and attachments first - so it would trailer much safer. Or just easily take a tire to the dealer, if need be.

I would probably save hundreds of dollars if I bought them now. Or would the backhoe be enough weight for most jobs? And couldn't I always fill the backhoe bucket with weights and achieve pretty much the same result?
 

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I just signed the proposal for a 1025r FILB. If I have it shipped here to Hawaii with wheel weights installed, I would save a ton of money. Shipping or buying separately later would be much more expensive. I have never ever driven a tractor before, so I don't know if I will even need them in the volcanic terrain I will be working in.

I never have mud, so traction might not be as big an issue as other places. But I have rocky, somewhat uneven terrain, and am on a slight hill as well.

I don't really want to fill the tires with liquid. First - I don't know how, or if anyone over here in my small town does. And if I ever have to work on the tires, or trailer the tractor to my close-by dealer on my undersized trailer, it would be nice to just remove the weights and attachments first - so it would trailer much safer. Or just easily take a tire to the dealer, if need be.

I would probably save hundreds of dollars if I bought them now. Or would the backhoe be enough weight for most jobs? And couldn't I always fill the backhoe bucket with weights and achieve pretty much the same result?
Wheel weights are certainly not a requirement. Ballast on the rear like the backhoe, or a Heavy Hitch is more useful for the loader.

I know that you are adamant against fluid, but in your climate, you could put pure water in the tires. ...for free. There are several videos online about how to do it.

If you do want wheel weights, there are a few choices.

There are 72lb starter weights. Part number: BM17973 You can put one of these on each side.

You can use 50lb cast weights. Part number: BM17972, You can add these in addition to the 72lb weights above, or use them as the only weights.

The above would be the BEST quality options.

To save some $$, you can use the 50lb plastic coated weights. Part number: BM17976
I have these because I found them "cheap" on craigslist. They are less expensive, but they will eventually wear out. The plastic will get brittle and they will eventually bust.

It is nice to have the extra ballast mounted "low" like with wheel weights. This deters the 'tip-over' somewhat.


Just my opinions..

Tim
 

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Here are the JD requirements for h120 ballast on a 1 series.
Approved Tires and Ballast for 1023E, 1025R, and 1026R Tractors

IMPORTANT: Tires are approved on their rated load capacity. Tires of similar size with equal to or greater load rating can be used.
BallastApproved Front TiresApproved Rear Tires
Minimum Ballast OptionsTire SizeTire TypeLoad IndexPly RatingTire SizeTire TypePly Rating
Option 1
273 kg (601 lb.) Rear Hitch Ballast
Fluid Filled Rear Tires
18 x 8.50-10
18 x 8.50-10
R4
R3
71
74
4
4
26 x 12.00-12
26 x 12.00-12
R4
R3
4
4
Option 2
230 kg (506 lb.) Rear Hitch Ballast
Three Rear Wheel Weights Per Side
18 X 8.50-10
18 X 8.50-10
R4
R3
71
74
4
4
26 x 12.00-12
26 x 12.00-12
R4
R3
4
4
Option 3
235 kg (517 lb.) Rear Hitch Ballast
One Rear Wheel Weight Per Side
Fluid Filled Rear Tires
18 X 8.50-10
18 X 8.50-10
R4
R3
71
74
4
4
26 x 12.00-12
26 x 12.00-12
R4
R3
4
4


note the universal use of either fluid or wheel weights...

The 260 weighs 610 lbs. It is a bit shy of requirements without wheel weight of some kind

Your call....
 

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I saved the plastic 50 lb weights from my X590 and use them when needed on my 1025R. So not sure if a dealer on your island would have those in stock.

But for counterweight the backhoe is plenty and I mostly use that when doing any serious lifting.
 

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It is nice to have the extra ballast mounted "low" like with wheel weights. This deters the 'tip-over' somewhat.


Just my opinions..

Tim[/QUOTE]

I'm a flat lander and didn't think I needed the wheel weights since I had no issues until the other day I was moving some wood , I have some home made pallet boxs I filled with wood and are at the extreme limits of the FEL, I slowly picked one up that was a tad overloaded only being able to raise it a few inches and started backing up when my right front tire went into a small dip in the ground. He left rear wheel quickly left the ground , Had I not been quick on the stick probably from years of working with heavy equipment I would likely had tipped it over. You don't realize how easy it is to tip one of these tractors until your 30% into it and have milliseconds to counter it. Rops was down - no seat belt on. Could have been a bad situation only moving this pallet 10 feet. So I'm looking into wheel ballast now and making sure the loads I use with the forks which extend the tipping point greatly are more adequate for the machine I'm using. We won't need ballast in the wheels after the tractor is laying on its side

Be smart - be safe -


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all the info - I'm always learning with the help of you guys - and think I would feel better with the extra safety margin added wheel weight would provide. I do intend to move heavy pallets, and I don't have a very even terrain.

Two more questions please:
1) Are there any downsides to added weight on/in the wheels other than the danger of sinking in soft soils/mud??? That is not a problem I will ever have.
2) Perhaps I am incorrectly adverse to liquid in the wheels. It sounds like a bad idea to me because when I have to remove a wheel for transmission service or to fix a flat or whatever - won't it be that much heavier to manage??? I'm just one guy in a remote area, and getting an extra body to help is always a problem. I am thinking that with weights I can always remove them independently and then just have an air filled tire to deal with. Is this a reasonable concern?

Oh - one more question I just thought of. Wouldn't liquid in the wheels provide more stability since it would be even lower to the ground than the weights?
 

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Thanks for all the info - I'm always learning with the help of you guys - and think I would feel better with the extra safety margin added wheel weight would provide. I do intend to move heavy pallets, and I don't have a very even terrain.

Two more questions please:
1) Are there any downsides to added weight on/in the wheels other than the danger of sinking in soft soils/mud??? That is not a problem I will ever have.
2) Perhaps I am incorrectly adverse to liquid in the wheels. It sounds like a bad idea to me because when I have to remove a wheel for transmission service or to fix a flat or whatever - won't it be that much heavier to manage??? I'm just one guy in a remote area, and getting an extra body to help is always a problem. I am thinking that with weights I can always remove them independently and then just have an air filled tire to deal with. Is this a reasonable concern?

Oh - one more question I just thought of. Wouldn't liquid in the wheels provide more stability since it would be even lower to the ground than the weights?
Weight is always good

And yes fluid is better then steel. But both beats either one alone.

Ive never herd anyone wish they had less ballast.



Sent from my LGL52VL using Tapatalk
 

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Thanks for all the info - I'm always learning with the help of you guys - and think I would feel better with the extra safety margin added wheel weight would provide. I do intend to move heavy pallets, and I don't have a very even terrain.

Two more questions please:
1) Are there any downsides to added weight on/in the wheels other than the danger of sinking in soft soils/mud??? That is not a problem I will ever have.
2) Perhaps I am incorrectly adverse to liquid in the wheels. It sounds like a bad idea to me because when I have to remove a wheel for transmission service or to fix a flat or whatever - won't it be that much heavier to manage??? I'm just one guy in a remote area, and getting an extra body to help is always a problem. I am thinking that with weights I can always remove them independently and then just have an air filled tire to deal with. Is this a reasonable concern?

Oh - one more question I just thought of. Wouldn't liquid in the wheels provide more stability since it would be even lower to the ground than the weights?
I thought perhaps that I would regret the wheel weights and fluid when mowing early in spring (while it is wet). However, I don't notice any ruts. It doesn't seem to do any harm, even when wet.

Overall, the tractor feels more stable, and I feel like I can at least pick up something "light" (< 200lb) with the loader without fetching 'real' counter-balance.
Of course the ballast police will be all over me for saying that.

Tim
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I thought perhaps that I would regret the wheel weights and fluid when mowing early in spring (while it is wet). However, I don't notice any ruts. It doesn't seem to do any harm, even when wet.

Overall, the tractor feels more stable, and I feel like I can at least pick up something "light" (< 200lb) with the loader without fetching 'real' counter-balance.
Of course the ballast police will be all over me for saying that.

Tim
Thanks Tim - I've watched most (if not all) of your videos and of course noticed the wheel weights. I didn't realize you also had fluid in the tires. Good to know.

But I am still puzzled as to how everything works when removing tires and/or fixing a flat. Is that not something that is a concern - for a "one man operation?"
 

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ALOHA!

Not to to play the devil's advocate...but i have not found the necessity for either wheel weights or loaded tires...I live on a steep hill and I have found the TLB to be very stable. I'm just saying you can run these things fine without them... Better with it for sure... but I have not experienced any deficits without. I have not loaded my tires for the reasons you mentioned...I don't feel like lifting the extra weight when I change the trans fluid or get a flat. The BH is a heavy chunk of metal...without it the weights become more of a necessity.

(Sidenote)The wife and I were married over on Kauai...:angel:
 

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Since you are in a non freezing area and could use straight water for a liquid tire weight, just dump it in the event you need to remove a tire to do service work or make a tire repair.

If you EVER plan to use the tractor loader with the backhoe off, you WILL want loaded tires/rear wheel weights.

I would get them NOW since the savings is greatest buying them now. You could always sell them if you decide they are not wanted.
 

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Thanks Tim - I've watched most (if not all) of your videos and of course noticed the wheel weights. I didn't realize you also had fluid in the tires. Good to know.

But I am still puzzled as to how everything works when removing tires and/or fixing a flat. Is that not something that is a concern - for a "one man operation?"
I'm getting somewhat close to my 200 hour service. So, I'll have to figure out how to deal with this. We are planning to video the service work, so perhaps you'll get a chance to see the tire fall over and me not be able to get it back up!
I will have to take the wheel weight off, then try to figure a way to keep the tire upright and positioned properly for re-attachment. Sounds like a challenge!

In your case, it would seem that draining the water if necessary would be easy enough. So, you can experiment with water, and if you don't like it, get rid of it.
That is not as easy for those of us in freezing climates.


Oh, and thanks for watching our videos!
 

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When I have to remove/reinstall my loaded rear tires I roll the tire onto a piece of 2x8 beside the axle...which is nornally all the higher that ive raised the tractor off the ground in the first place. Then with a roll around floor jack under the tractor diff i can raise/lower the tractor until a wheel bolt lines up. Reinstalling my wheel weights by myself is more of a pita than the loaded tires are.
 

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When I have to remove/reinstall my loaded rear tires I roll the tire onto a piece of 2x8 beside the axle...which is nornally all the higher that ive raised the tractor off the ground in the first place. Then with a roll around floor jack under the tractor diff i can raise/lower the tractor until a wheel bolt lines up. Reinstalling my wheel weights by myself is more of a pita than the loaded tires are.
That's what I do too. Makes it easy.
 

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Fluid filled tires are not that heavy on these small tractors. You are only adding about 80lbs each. Sure, it is more work than if they weren't filled, but much less work than removing steel weights.
 
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