Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 49 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
What oil does the front axle take? I can't seem to find this in the manual, all i see is this "Add approximately 2.8 L (3.0 qt) of recommended oil through dipstick fill opening until oil level is correct."

thanks
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,665 Posts
It takes hydraulic oil. Use the same oil as you would in the transmission, low vis Hygard or regular Hygard. :thumbup1gif:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
373 Posts
Grumble, grumble....

Just checked mine for the first time at 195 hours. No visible leaks, but I had to add a quart. Makes me mad that I didn't check it beforehand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
489 Posts
Just checked mine for the first time at 195 hours. No visible leaks, but I had to add a quart. Makes me mad that I didn't check it beforehand.
Myasis,

I experienced the same thing at around 300 hours. No visible leaks or oil on the garage floor but, one day, the front end was making an unusual metal-to-metal type noise. I drove back to the garage and checked the axle oil level and the dip stick was dry. Yikes! I check it a lot more often now-a-days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
I had the same question a while back and someone pointed out that the oil type is on a label under your hood. Same as your transmission fluid.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,542 Posts
I'm at 160 hours and never checked it. I will tomorrow.:thumbup1gif:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,048 Posts
mine is at 85 hours and dry on dip stick
That's not good, especially if you've been in 4 wheel drive a lot. I would take the vent screws out, take the dip stick out and drain it and replace. One reason is to get any debris out from inadequate lube, the second is so the dealer won't see Anything in oil if it goes bad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,929 Posts
That's not good, especially if you've been in 4 wheel drive a lot. I would take the vent screws out, take the dip stick out and drain it and replace. One reason is to get any debris out from inadequate lube, the second is so the dealer won't see Anything in oil if it goes bad.
These front axles are always "in four wheel drive". Unbelievable that Deere has us running light hydraulic fluid in a low speed axle assembly.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,120 Posts
These front axles are always "in four wheel drive". Unbelievable that Deere has us running light hydraulic fluid in a low speed axle assembly.
That's true. Even in 2WD the front tires are driving the front differential and spinning the drive shaft. It makes you wonder what the difference is between a 1-series front axle and a GEN-1 2-series front axle. On the GEN-1 2-series front axles they use 80W90 gear oil.

Oddly the new GEN-2 2-series uses standard Hy-Gard hydraulic oil in the front axle as does the 3-series like the 3033R.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,048 Posts
These front axles are always "in four wheel drive". Unbelievable that Deere has us running light hydraulic fluid in a low speed axle assembly.
MFWD
Mechanicle front wheel drive enables the power train to to drive both the front and rear axles. It is not always in four wheel, DRIVE.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,120 Posts
MFWD
Mechanicle front wheel drive enables the power train to to drive both the front and rear axles. It is not always in four wheel, DRIVE.
Correct. I interpreted the previous posters statement to mean that the entire front drive train is always spinning even in 2WD. Which is true. Unlike most 4WD vehicles in which in 2WD the hubs uncouple from the front differential and free wheel meaning the differential gears and front drive shaft are not spinning at all times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
778 Posts
May need a lighter oil because the tolerances are much tighter than days past? Like foreign cars that use 0 weight oil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,048 Posts
Correct. I interpreted the previous posters statement to mean that the entire front drive train is always spinning even in 2WD. Which is true. Unlike most 4WD vehicles in which in 2WD the hubs uncouple from the front differential and free wheel meaning the differential gears and front drive shaft are not spinning at all times.
I was just trying to help mike out with his bone dry front axle. My concern was instead of spinning freely, the trans axle was being driven from the power train bone dry which is not good.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,120 Posts
May need a lighter oil because the tolerances are much tighter than days past? Like foreign cars that use 0 weight oil.
From what I have read, the use of 0-weight oils is targeted at reducing emissions during startup and improved fuel economy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,304 Posts
You guys shouldn't worry a second about having Hygard in the front axle. Tractors with standard transmissions have used "universal tractor fluid" in their gearboxes for decades, and that's basically the same thing. Heck both of my standard transmission tractors are full of UTF because they have the integrated hydraulic system, I guarantee they have bigger, slower turning gears than the front axle of a 1025. Nothing to stress about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
186 Hours 1025R

I just did my 200 hour service and although they don't call for front axle fluid change, I felt it wouldn't hurt. Well, glad I did. The fluid looked dirty (gray) as heck. The oil the dealer gave me was different than my hydraulic oil. They gave me GL-5 Gear Lubricant SAE 80W-90. The Hydraulic oil was the HY-GARD Transmission and Hydraulic Oil. Front end feels much better now. I would advise anyone to change at 200 hours and maybe even before then.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,120 Posts
I just did my 200 hour service and although they don't call for front axle fluid change, I felt it wouldn't hurt. Well, glad I did. The fluid looked dirty (gray) as heck. The oil the dealer gave me was different than my hydraulic oil. They gave me GL-5 Gear Lubricant SAE 80W-90. The Hydraulic oil was the HY-GARD Transmission and Hydraulic Oil. Front end feels much better now. I would advise anyone to change at 200 hours and maybe even before then.
Your dealer gave you the wrong oil for your front axle!

This is from the 1025R Operator's Manual:

[h=3]Front Axle and MFWD Oil[/h]

LVAL38329-UN-21AUG12

[HR][/HR]Use oil viscosity based on the expected air temperature range during the period between oil changes.


The following oils are preferred:

  • John Deere Hy-Gard™
  • John Deere Low Viscosity Hy-Gard™

Other oils may be used if they meet one of the following:

  • John Deere Standard JDM J20C
  • John Deere Standard JDM J20D
A lot of other tractors like the older 2-series use GL-5 80W-90 but the 1-series tractors have always used Hy-Gard.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,303 Posts
Your dealer gave you the wrong oil for your front axle!

This is from the 1025R Operator's Manual:

A lot of other tractors like the older 2-series use GL-5 80W-90 but the 1-series tractors have always used Hy-Gard.
Not that I'm going to experiment with my tractor, but, what would make the new tractors different? And I am asking only because I would like to know, 80/90 is used in an awful lot of gearboxes, what would be the difference? Other than simply because the manual states this, the manual on the new tractors also does not call for any fluid service until 200 hours and we all know that's poor advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,158 Posts
In my 2305 and the ex3200 I use 80-90 wt oil
 
1 - 20 of 49 Posts
Top