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What is the best motor oil for my 1025r? It is a 2018 and this is its 1st oil change.
Wow... that is a loaded question. Oil choice is similar to fuel additives and the need for chains in the winter. If you ask 12 people you will likely get 10 different answers.

Given this is the first oil change I would stick with what is recommended in the Owner's Manual for your climate. There are a lot of good oils on the market. I have always just stayed with the JD Plus-50 II engine oil. Depending on how cold it gets where you live switching to JD's 0W-40 full synthetic may be a good choice. If you live in a milder climate 15W-40 seems to be the defacto standard.
 

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What is the best motor oil for my 1025r? It is a 2018 and this is its 1st oil change.
Do you drive a Chevy, Ford, or Dodge?:lolol:


Any name brand diesel-rated oils that meets the specs in your owners manual will work great
 

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While under warranty I decided to run Deeres oil to avoid possible complications if warranty repair should be required.
My hours of use were low enough to dictate once a year changes.
For my first change I went with their 15w-40 regular oil. My next change I went with the synthetic 0w-40 I believe.
I'm a bit old school and believe that no matter how microscopic that engine break in does occur, and I don't like to add synthetic to a motor that wasn't factory filled with it until I get it run in a bit.
You probably really couldn't hurt one of these engines if you ran any diesel compatible oil you wished to.
 

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I personally run Shell rotella T5 synthetic blend 15W40 in my tractor year-around.
 

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I was asked if i wanted about a 1/4 of a barrel of Mobil 15W40 a few years back when we were de-mobilizing a job. I filled a bunch of jugs and have been using that. Excellent oil we use in heavy equipment a lot.
 

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Just my .02cents, if you read the owners manual Deere has pushed the first engine service out 2 or past 100hrs & there is a tech sheet somewhere stating if the owner requires an oil change at 50hrs to reinstall Deere break-in oil until specified time. I work on quite a few Yanmar engines both in Deere "skid steered" & gen sets and have seen three cases where engine oil quality "too clean, too many detergents, not soupy enough to promote good cylinder etching & carry the debris away" has caused ultimately engine damage or premature wear I.e. low compression. You can go on the Yanmar u.s. site & see what Yanmar recommends for this engine family as well.
 

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Just my .02cents, if you read the owners manual Deere has pushed the first engine service out 2 or past 100hrs & there is a tech sheet somewhere stating if the owner requires an oil change at 50hrs to reinstall Deere break-in oil until specified time. I work on quite a few Yanmar engines both in Deere "skid steered" & gen sets and have seen three cases where engine oil quality "too clean, too many detergents, not soupy enough to promote good cylinder etching & carry the debris away" has caused ultimately engine damage or premature wear I.e. low compression. You can go on the Yanmar u.s. site & see what Yanmar recommends for this engine family as well.
Engine oil too clean? :dunno:
 

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there is a tech sheet somewhere stating if the owner requires an oil change at 50hrs to reinstall Deere break-in oil until specified time. You can go on the Yanmar u.s. site & see what Yanmar recommends for this engine family as well.
This has been debated before. I would like to see some actual documentation. Got any links?
 

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I read this too, don’t remember where. It says that if the engine was not worked hard, or idled a lot the first 50, you could put break in oil back in for another 50. Yanmar has some of the best engines in the world made by some of the best and most precise equipment on earth. The tolerances are almost perfect on the engines. I doubt break in goes past a couple hours.
 

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I like the Deere 0-40 full synthetic. This stuff sits on our shelves SO long that I get it under cost. For whatever reason it just doesn't sell. So I get it at times for $1 a Qt. I stock pile it!
Any chance you could send some of that stock to Wisconsin? I run the Shell Rotella T6 5W-40 year round in my 1025r. I've looked at four different dealers and not a one of them stocks the John Deere full synthetic 0W-40. They can order it, but don't seem to interested to do so. Not a demand for it so they don't sell it.

I toyed with ordering it from Green Farm Parts, but it's really easy to just grab a gallon of the Shell Rotella T6 at Walmart.
 

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AMSOIL 5W-40 diesel oil in mine.
I have it already for the pickup, and it works well.
 

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I read this too, don’t remember where. It says that if the engine was not worked hard, or idled a lot the first 50, you could put break in oil back in for another 50. Yanmar has some of the best engines in the world made by some of the best and most precise equipment on earth. The tolerances are almost perfect on the engines. I doubt break in goes past a couple hours.
Basic math makes me agree with you 100%. For years, I built and raced dragsters and each engine cost what a half dozen or more of these tractors cost. The break in was done on a Dyno and took less than 30 minutes. We always ran a break in additive on the Dyno and then regular motor oil thereafter.

The typical RPM's in the Yanmar for the 1 series runs at 3,100 RPM's (+ or -) to get the engine up to PTO speed. 3,100 RPM's is 186,000 complete revolutions per hour, so in 50 hours, the piston rings and cylinder walls have completed 9,300,000 cycles......up and down......so at 100 hours, the engine has completed 18,600,000 cycles......if it isn't broken in by then, it never will be.......

Personally, I subscribe to the 50 hours is plenty of time for proper break in. As long as the engine isn't started and run at one RPM the entire time, break in is completed properly much sooner, most likely within the first hand full of hours.

I have a Yanmar with 3,000 plus hours on it that doesn't burn any oil and runs great. I have changed the oil every 100 hours since new. I also use Amsoil Synthetic oil 0-40w in the winter and I switch up to 15w-40w for summer mowing use, after the first oil change. I could run the same oil year around and likely will once my stock of 15w-40 oil is gone.

I run the 10w-40w Small Engine oil in my Kawasaki in the Zero turn and change it every 100 hours as well. That's an air cooled engine so the oil has extra duties plus it is stored during cold months so I am not worried about the winter months.

I do know that we specifically did not run Synthetic oil during the break in because it's "too slippery" or lubricates so well, it didn't permit the break in process to occur. So while I wouldn't ever suggest Synthetic Oil for the early hours of a new or rebuilt engines operation, after it's been run and break in has occurred, it's ideal in my opinion.

Clearly, you do not want multi viscosity oil with detergents in power wash pump assemblies, etc. where they will encounter moisture during their operation. It will turn the oil into a milky mess in a hurry and whips it into a frothy mix which will destroy the pump. But if your Yanmar motor oil is making contact with water or excess moisture, there is something wrong which needs to be repaired. That's why Cat and the other high quality pump makers recommend a straight weight, non detergent motor oil. I usually just order the oil for my Cat pumps from Northern Tool and just use what Cat suggests. But that is a very different scenario than what should be taking place inside the Yanmar diesel engine.....
 

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This has been debated before. I would like to see some actual documentation. Got any links?
I too have seen break in oil debated many times. Funny how so many people say "I read somewhere" or "can't remember where". I'd like to see it where it says these motors are shipped with it and changing oil early you have to put break in oil back.
 

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I too have seen break in oil debated many times. Funny how so many people say "I read somewhere" or "can't remember where". I'd like to see it where it says these motors are shipped with it and changing oil early you have to put break in oil back.
There has been confusion because of documents such as this one:PMB Product:

and this one:http://www.deere.com/en_US/ag/servicesupport/tips/augusta/5000/pf_understandingoil.html

This is a John Deere page that discusses kinds of oil they sell and talks about John Deere engines. I've seen other pages with similar language, but the wording is: "to be used in rebuilt or remanufactured engines and new John Deere engines during the initial break-in period." I also read a page earlier today that mentioned all rebuilt or remanufactured engines and new "John Deere Engines" come with break in oil. It doesn't say all Tractors. That same page then goes on to mention 5 series tractors at the end of the document. So the argument can be that it may apply to engines JD builds for themselves. Would a Yanmar engine apply? Then the argument goes on to say that nobody is exactly sure when oil is put into the Yanmar. At the Yanmar factory or at JD during assy. I cannot yet find anything that directly mentions the Yanmar in the small line of tractors, such a the 1025r, that spells out in black and white that it has break in oil at delivery. So should we just use the owners manual as gospel and change it at 200 hours regardless of time past? Change it once a year regardless of hours as long it's past 50? Do it at anytime from 50 to 200 hours? Another interesting note. I was surfing other manuals just for laughs and found some sort of funky looking JD mower. It appeared to have some sort of 3 cylinder Yanmar judging by the part number. It had you changing the oil at 10 hours. That didn't sound like it had break in oil. I also surfed and found a manual on a 3 banger Yanmar marine engine. All it said under maintenance was to change the oil at 50 hours. This is one of those endless debates that comes up every so often.
 

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There has been confusion because of documents such as this one:PMB Product:

and this one:Understanding Engine Oil : Information about break-in oil, oil additives, recommended oil types, service intervals, and more.

This is a John Deere page that discusses kinds of oil they sell and talks about John Deere engines. I've seen other pages with similar language, but the wording is: "to be used in rebuilt or remanufactured engines and new John Deere engines during the initial break-in period." I also read a page earlier today that mentioned all rebuilt or remanufactured engines and new "John Deere Engines" come with break in oil. It doesn't say all Tractors. That same page then goes on to mention 5 series tractors at the end of the document. So the argument can be that it may apply to engines JD builds for themselves. Would a Yanmar engine apply? Then the argument goes on to say that nobody is exactly sure when oil is put into the Yanmar. At the Yanmar factory or at JD during assy. I cannot yet find anything that directly mentions the Yanmar in the small line of tractors, such a the 1025r, that spells out in black and white that it has break in oil at delivery. So should we just use the owners manual as gospel and change it at 200 hours regardless of time past? Change it once a year regardless of time? Do it at anytime from 50 to 200 hours? Another interesting note. I was surfing other manuals just for laughs and found some sort of funky looking JD mower. It appeared to have some sort of 3 cylinder Yanmar judging by the part number. It had you changing the oil at 10 hours. That didn't sound like it had break in oil. I also surfed and found a manual on a 3 banger Yanmar marine engine manual. All it said under maintenance was to change the oil at 50 hours. This is one of those endless debates that comes up every so often.
Isn't there a difference between John Deere engines and Yanmar engines? John Deere = high hp
 

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Well I held back from posting on this thread for awhile but I just had to add my two cents!!! :laugh::laugh:

The real issue is, when an engine is breaking it, what parts are actually breaking in and if there is break in oil in an engine, why is there break in oil in the engine.

Here goes........When an engine is breaking in, it has nothing to do with piston rings, it has all to do with camshafts and lifters!!!!! Its incorrect to think that piston rings have to "wear in", they do not.

The reason for break in oil, or break in lube, is to break in the camshaft when the engine is first started, either when new or rebuilt, and the camshaft is broken in in the first 1/2 hour of running the engine, and this 1/2 hour of running is done on the engine dyno.

Any engine that is put in anything in today's world is broken in before it every gets installed in the tractor, vehicle, equipment, etc.

So, do you have to run break in oil in any engine, the easy answer is absolutely not!!!! Now, if it makes you feel better, go for it, it isn't going to hurt anything because the only difference between break in oil and standard oil is break in oil has zinc in it which clings to the camshaft lobes and lifters, it does nothing for piston rings.

The old theory of having to break in piston rings was always an inaccurate statement. Breaking in an engine always had to do with breaking in the camshaft and most times, when assembling a new engine, assembly lube is used on the camshaft lobes and lifters which provides the zinc coating to break in the camshaft, so even when the engine is initially fired, the engine does not need to have break in oil in it.

As others have said, do not lose any sleep over "what is the best oil" because this question cannot be answered. Use a good quality oil that is recommended for diesel engines of the correct viscosity based on the owners manual and you won't go wrong and change it regularly.
 
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