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Would like to inquire with the collective group about purchasing a box blade for my 1025R. I am told I should not use anything larger than a 48 inch - which he quoted me a Frontier at mid $800 range.
Appreciate any insight from group.
 

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I've put a ton of hours on my 60" box blade from Tractor Supply that cost less than the smaller green 48". The limitations of a 60" box blade will be no different than a 48". So consider maneuverability more than if it can handle it. I'm extremely happy with the 60" and have knocked out many projects with it. It weighs about 400lbs and is a beast. Not some tin foil junk.

Before paving the driveway: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_RqnxNmV0M

After paving: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t9QWchzqN90

https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/countyline-box-blade-5-ft
 

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I have a 48" on my x738 it's a good size for me. A 54" should be a good fit for a 1 series if you are ripping deep or moving lots of material. If you are doing light ripping in loose soil/gravel or just grooming a driveway a 60" will be ok.

The 1 series is still a limited cat 1 by lift height so you will want a blade that doesn't have a high moldboard.
 

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If you use a box blade to its capacity a 48” will be the max. Even at that size I can stall the tractor. I had the frontier BB2048 but any from a major manufacturer should be fine. EA, landpride, woods. Etc.

The single best addition to a box blade is a hydraulic top link.


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Plenty of height on the Country Line. I was pleasantly surprised by that. Really nice when maneuvering on uneven terrain to not have it dragging or bouncing on the ground.

I can fill up the 60" box blade with crusher run or soil without stalling. As with any box blade, if you have the rippers dug in or the cutting edge dug in, it will bog down eventually. Even with a 48", you probably won't get it loaded all the way up with the rippers all the way down really cutting in with the blade. But once you get the hang of feathering the lift to regulate how much you're carrying, it's a breeze. I can push a full face full of dirt in reverse too BTW.

Usually if I bite off more than I can chew, I just lose traction rather than stalling out though. But that probably also depends on the terrain.
 

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I had a quote of $700 for a 2048L with purchase of my tractor. I found a nearly new 2048 on Craigslist and gave $450. Might be worth a quick search.
 

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I’ve been running the frontier BB5060L on my 1025 for two years now, maintaining a 1/2 gravel driveway...no issues here, I load up the box and it still have plenty of power to move it.


2018 - 1025R
120R, 54SB, iMatch, BB5060L, RB5060L, AP10F
2018 Z930M
 

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If you are not on a timeline, start watching the tractor sale websites (I look at Tractorhouse). I eventually found a like new BB2048L for $400. I had to drive to get it, but it was a nice 2 day road trip with the wife.

I guess if you add in the fuel, meals, shopping, etc, I didn’t save that much money, but I feel good about the &400 deal. Ha ha
 

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It all depends on how you are going to use it, the soil conditions, etc. Its easy to grade existing driveways and re-spread existing or newly added material, it's hard to use the scarifiers and rip virgin soil to reposition it. If you are working on a hard surface and spreading material, you could go larger than the 48". If you are planning to go out to soil which has not been disturbed and lowering the scarifiers down to the maximum depth, then its a WHOLE DIFFERENT BALLGAME.......

Too large a box blade for your intended project means frustration, stalled and stopped tractors. "Too Small" means more seat time and passes........The upside is easy, the downside is a problem.

What good is a larger box blade if its so large, you have to take partial depth passes so the machine can handle it? In the end, its no different than having a smaller box blade which requires more passes to cover the same area, except with the smaller box blade, you have a choice, with the larger one, you might not have a choice as to the depth of material you can move etc.

Moving light loamy soil you can fill the box blade all day and have no issues. Get into clay or wet conditions where traction is a challenge and the experience couldn't be more different.

i have moved sand, clay, stone, crushed concrete and the compaction of the area where you are working makes a HUGE DIFFERENCE......You can move a box blade full of gravel on a compacted driveway without any issues, try to do the same on wet clay and you are going no where.

Personally, I would error on the side of knowing I could use it under any conditions, instead of hoping I have the right conditions. For me, that meant the 48" Frontier Box blade and it works just fine.

Box blades take some practice to get really good with them. So plan on making plenty of mistakes and having to "re do" things a few times. But that's how you learn plus it's really good experience.

Keep in mind that 3 point hitches are meant to pull implements and they are not designed to push heavily loaded rear implements. When you are pulling the rear implement the hitch is being used as designed. I don't push backwards with my box blade simply because I don't like how it presses on the rear case and 3 ph mounting arm points. Many people push with their rear 3 points and haven't had any issues with them. But a few have. I haven't seen anyone damage their tractor pulling with the rear 3 point hitch, but there have been some who have bent 3 point arms, broken hardware and even broken the mounting points on the rear hydro case which is a very expensive repair as you have to replace the rear case assembly. So be careful about overloading the tractor and using it in ways which it's not intended.
 

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Over the past 2 seasons I have used my box blade extensively to regrade about 3/4 of an acre of my property. I lowered one end of my backyard about 2' moving it about 100' to the center. If you are using the scarifers to loosen virgin soil, which I was, and drag a box of dirt, a 4' is all a 1 series can handle effectively. I would much rather use my implement to it's fullest capacity, rather than at half capacity because it is too large for my tractors ability. I purchased a few years back a brand new 5' County Line and within one week I traded it for a used 4' Howes. With the scarifers down on the 5'er, the box would fill quickly and stop me dead in my tracks. It makes no sense having to let material out when the sole purpose is to move material from one area to another. Fill a 4' and move a box of dirt or partially fill a 5' and multiple pass to move the material.

There is nothing more frustrating than when the equipment you spent good hard earned money on, can't do the job. The choose is yours. :unknown:
 

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I completely agree that you need to consider the mission before buying the tool to do it. So while I've had 100% success with a 60" blade, that doesn't mean someone in different conditions will. What I've done has been moving and grading crusher run stone, fill dirt, topsoil, and ripping up the top layers of the yard.
 

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A box blade is a very useful tool. Last weekend at my sons we cut in a 10’ x 80’ boat storage driveway. Mid week he got 7.5 yards of stone delivered. Today we spread it and leveled. Under 6 hours time. I had a hard time prying his hands off of the steering wheel.to get seat time. Then I saw what a great job he was doing and just let him do it. His first time using a box blade and I was impressed.
 

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Earlier this spring I got a China made 5' box blade from our local auto, farm store.

On sale it was about half cheaper than the steel to build one the same size. Also about half again heavier than some models of 5' box blades.

What an implement like this is made for, and capable of, labels and color out of the box are not important to me. I can change color. Even though I am the worlds worst implement painter. This tool does all I need it to do well.

Every ones preferences may be different.
 

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Whatever one you choose, make sure it can hold suitcase weights (most should). Adding weight gives it much greater dig when needed for certain projects. It would have been a much tougher project leveling out my clay field without the added weight peeling up the heavy clay.
 

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...
Keep in mind that 3 point hitches are meant to pull implements and they are not designed to push heavily loaded rear implements. When you are pulling the rear implement the hitch is being used as designed. I don't push backwards with my box blade simply because I don't like how it presses on the rear case and 3 ph mounting arm points. Many people push with their rear 3 points and haven't had any issues with them. But a few have. I haven't seen anyone damage their tractor pulling with the rear 3 point hitch, but there have been some who have bent 3 point arms, broken hardware and even broken the mounting points on the rear hydro case which is a very expensive repair as you have to replace the rear case assembly. So be careful about overloading the tractor and using it in ways which it's not intended.
Thanks for this valuable insight. Other than knocking down a mound left by the box blade I never pushed with it. it just didn’t feel right, but I never really thought about it.

I have the BB 5048L and it seems just about right sized for the series one. Btw, Kens extended top link hook made it a lot easier to attach to the Imatch.
 

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I too struggled with this decision when I first got my 1025r due to the number of options out there. I settled on the frontier 2048. Even with it being only 48" I can still stop the tractor when heavy ripping if the ground isn't very dry. If you plan on ripping and moving dirt I definitely would not get anything but a 48" blade. Anything bigger and you will just be pissed off when your tractor is stopped constantly.

Also consider the weight of the box. Heavier is better. That is why I went with the 2048 over the L models. In my limited experience if you are using a bb, you will most likely be using the FEL as well. That is why weight is important, the more ballast the better. As far as the limited lift height of our 3pts, unless you are trailering the tractor with the BB attached I do not think it is really an issue. Best of luck and make sure you check Craigslist for some used deals.
 
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