Green Tractor Talk banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I Need to occasionally transport my 1025R about 3 miles on smooth road. With the hydro pedal to the floor on smooth level road, (and especially down hill) the motor is not under obvious load, but must be near full throttle to get any speed. Is there a way to increase road speed, or lower RPM for "no load" conditions? Also, will I do damage to the tractor coasting in neutral down hills in order to increase road speed and decrease engine RPM. Obviously I'm in 2WD on pavement. Also, I understand faster=more risk of crash, but longer time on the road also = more risk of being hit by vehicles, or getting frostbite.

Thanks.

Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
Don't mean to be flip, but that's why I purchased a trailer.
Dunno about modifying the tractor for more speed, but the thing isn't built with any sort of suspension that you would need to control a vehicle moving over a few mph - hitting a significant bump at speeds over a few mph can be a disaster. I would think this would be a no-no in terms of plain old safety, but that's just my $0.02.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
21,928 Posts
With the tractor in neutral, you can't simply just put in back in gear. You have to come to a complete stop before you could get it back in gear. It's very risky to run faster than the tractor can go in gear with it in neutral.

There's no feasible way to modify the top speed or engine rpms. It's one of those "it is what it is" kinda things.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,527 Posts
There's no feasible way to modify the top speed or engine rpms. It's one of those "it is what it is" kinda things.
^^^^This. The only way you are going to get more speed is to redesign the entire transmission to add another high-range gear. Not very practical.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,553 Posts
I think it would make a very interesting (and funny!) video to watch someone rolling downhill 20 plus on a "Mexican Hayride" and putting on the "PARKING BRAKE"! It sez "parking brake" in the book and I bet at speed it is far less than that what with the differential and all!:laugh:

I believe all one needs to know about forward motion settings is in the 1025 "Owner's Manual". But to each his own... "Yeeee-Hawwwwwww"...:laugh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Safety

Fixman:
I have a trailer. But don't feel all that safe trying to stop my truck going down a steep snow covered hill with an extra 2,000 + # attached to the back that can (and has) easily jack-knifed or just doesn't want to stop. Perhaps if I had a dually trailer with antilock brakes things would be different, but, I feel I have far more control with all 4 of the tractor's wheels on the ground in 4WD, but would like to go a little faster on the SMOOTH, clear newly paved sections of road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Power Shifting

With the tractor in neutral, you can't simply just put in back in gear. You have to come to a complete stop before you could get it back in gear. It's very risky to run faster than the tractor can go in gear with it in neutral.

There's no feasible way to modify the top speed or engine rpms. It's one of those "it is what it is" kinda things.
Actually, with a little practice, it's not that difficult to get the tractor back in gear smoothly without grinding while moving, you just need to sync RPM, Hydro-speed, and ground speed.

1) Throttle up (depending on rate of travel)
2) Press hydro pedal while in neutral to match ground speed.
3) Shift in to high gear.

It's kind of like powershifting a a car, I can't really explain how to do it because it's more about feel. But when you figure it out how to do it right it's a beautiful thing, when you get it wrong it's just plain ugly.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
21,928 Posts
Actually, with a little practice, it's not that difficult to get the tractor back in gear smoothly without grinding while moving, you just need to sync RPM, Hydro-speed, and ground speed.

1) Throttle up (depending on rate of travel)
2) Press hydro pedal while in neutral to match ground speed.
3) Shift in to high gear.

It's kind of like powershifting a a car, I can't really explain how to do it because it's more about feel. But when you figure it out how to do it right it's a beautiful thing, when you get it wrong it's just plain ugly.
Actually it's impossible to get the tractor back in gear once you've exceeded the tractor's maximum speed. This is known as the "pucker factor." Trying this can exceed the tolerances for pucker factor, and if you're lucky, all you'll have to deal with is a personal mess.:lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Wet Disk Brakes

I think it would make a very interesting (and funny!) video to watch someone rolling downhill 20 plus on a "Mexican Hayride" and putting on the "PARKING BRAKE"! It sez "parking brake" in the book and I bet at speed it is far less than that what with the differential and all!:laugh:

I believe all one needs to know about forward motion settings is in the 1025 "Owner's Manual". But to each his own... "Yeeee-Hawwwwwww"...:laugh:
I believe the term "Parking Brake" refers to the linkage mechanism that keeps the Wet disk brakes engaged when the operator leaves the seat, not the brakes themselves. (See the attached picture). Remember, these brakes need to stop the tractor on hills with a full bucket on the FEL and counter weights (possibly 2,000 # or more!)The Wet disk brakes on the 1025R are actually quite impressive. I wish the brakes on my car were this good. I think you would be surprised how quickly your "Mexican Hayride" came to a standstill if you Googled "Wet disk brakes and understood what a remarkable piece of engineering they really are.
Product Material property Auto part Seat belt Brand
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,444 Posts
Don't mean to be flip, but that's why I purchased a trailer.
Dunno about modifying the tractor for more speed, but the thing isn't built with any sort of suspension that you would need to control a vehicle moving over a few mph - hitting a significant bump at speeds over a few mph can be a disaster. I would think this would be a no-no in terms of plain old safety, but that's just my $0.02.
Wait, you got a trailer..... to pull with the tractor?:lol::lolol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,553 Posts
I believe the term "Parking Brake" refers to the linkage mechanism that keeps the Wet disk brakes engaged when the operator leaves the seat, not the brakes themselves. (See the attached picture). Remember, these brakes need to stop the tractor on hills with a full bucket on the FEL and counter weights (possibly 2,000 # or more!)The Wet disk brakes on the 1025R are actually quite impressive. I wish the brakes on my car were this good. I think you would be surprised how quickly your "Mexican Hayride" came to a standstill if you Googled "Wet disk brakes and understood what a remarkable piece of engineering they really are.
View attachment 41444


No matter what an engineering marvel "wet disc brakes" are, JD still calls them "the parking brake". If YOU want to "out think" the purpose and design of your braking system while exceeding "road speed"... Be sure to have somebody along with a camera!:lol:

It's a /hydrostatic small tractor transmission. It's designed AND manufactured for operating for purposes stated in the manual under conditions it's manufactured for. This thread illustrates why we have so many money hungry lawyers representing unthinking and/or foolish clients in court AND WINNING. WE (US, you and me, tractor buyers) all pay for that in the purchase price! We should be trying not to make JD prices any higher for court costs...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
457 Posts
This Idea has been done by many of us in the past who have owned, or still own a Collar shift tractor, with or without synchro's . I coasted just once down a grade on a hill, from one lot to another, in the spring with my 4005, and hit a frost heave. IF you do not know what a frost heave is, dont ask, but we do grow large ones here. The tractor with no suspension is a scary ride when trying to recover from a small "airborne" mission.
Its not made for it, and I learned...had to check my "drawers" after :laugh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Fast Tractors?

This doesn't really help but if you want a fast tractor go to Ireland. When my wife and I were over there several years ago I noticed the tractors pulling the peat buggy's flying down the country roads. In fact I saw one coming through town (2 lane) running very fast, at least 40 pulling a buggy. The tractor was one that I did not recognize, it had a cab and was very large. I noticed that I was unable to see an operator? Seriously I could not see the operator through the front glass. As it got closer and I was trying to figure out where the operator was I found him. It was a little kid, standing on the platform looking through the clutch side lower glass of the cab steering the thing. To this day I have no idea how this kid could drive that thing but he was and had it wound up in road gear. Darnedest thing I have ever seen. I asked the fellow that we rented our cottage from about it. He said "ah yea, that's the kid down the way, he's been driving for years". Blew my mind!!

Moral of the story if you want a fast tractor get one from Europe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
754 Posts
Yes, at tractors in Europe fly compared to domestic tractors. Europe =35-40 mph, domestic = 25. Minneapolis-Moline built a tractor back in the late 1930's that could run 32-35 mph, had a metal cab with glass windows, heater I believe, was supposed to replace the farm family's car or truck. It was quite a bit more expensive than other normal tractors so sales were really low, which makes them worth big bucks today.

Might take some modifications to the fenders, but installing taller tires will speed up a tractor. Stock 26 inch tall tires = 9 mph, 52 inch tall tire = 18 mph, but you'll have to increase front tire size proportionately to keep your fwa working.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,812 Posts
I've personally been inside half a dozen or more of the 1 series transmissions. Not all that robust when you get to yankin and crankin on em.
If roading is something thats going to be done on a regular basis, I would add some more flashing lights or have someone follow you with flashers on before I would ever try to increase the ground speed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
Fixman:
I have a trailer. But don't feel all that safe trying to stop my truck going down a steep snow covered hill with an extra 2,000 + # attached to the back that can (and has) easily jack-knifed or just doesn't want to stop. Perhaps if I had a dually trailer with antilock brakes things would be different, but, I feel I have far more control with all 4 of the tractor's wheels on the ground in 4WD, but would like to go a little faster on the SMOOTH, clear newly paved sections of road.
I certainly see your problem here... you have a difficult situation, good luck with that!
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top