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Anyone using a post hole digger on a 1025r? I need to dig some 10 inch holes and wonder if the little guy is up to the job
 

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Yup, it works ok. I have drilled at least 100 holes (no exaggeration) with my Frontier PHD100. There are two schools of thought for using the phd on these little guys. I prefer to go full 540 PTO RPM and when I hear the engine start to bog and I will pull up on the phd so it doesn't screw itself into the ground. Others like to go slow and pull out when they start to bog, I've heard the slower method works better in rocky soils. The main problem is the auger likes to screw into the ground and the tractor doesn't have the power to pull the auger out of the ground or keep the auger from the pulling the tractor down. I have screwed the auger into the ground and have had to use a bigazz pipe wrench to unscrew the auger.
 

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I have a PHD100 as well, I use it frequently with a 12 inch auger. I have used it with a 9 inch auger as well, but in my soil, the 12 inch one works so much better. It seemed like the 9 inch one was prone to breaking shear bolts in my hard soil.

How well it works really depends on your soil. We have lots of clay, and sometimes it doesn't want to dig down it just sits there spinning on top of the soil. I rarely have the problem of it digging faster than I can control. I am mostly in the "dig at idle" camp. I do vary the throttle settings as I dig, though , sometimes faster does seem to work better.

Just a couple of suggestions. Keep plenty of shear bolts on hand. Clear the hole out as you go by lifting the auger slightly every now and then. And keep the cutting edges and tip clear of roots, vegetation, etc.

When it works as it should, it's really nice to dig a 3 foot deep hole in less than a minute.
 

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Is the 3 point PHD for the category 1 3ph on the 1 series a specific unit due to the limited lift height?

Am I correct that just any 3ph post hole auger won't work on the 1 series due to the lift height?

What about the angle of the PTO driveshaft? It would seem to be rather extreme at the auger digging starting position or when lifted out of the ground due to the length of the 3ph arms, is this correct?

Also, for those who have purchased a PHD for the 1 series machines, what is the cost for the unit with the PTO shaft and roughly how much are the augers each?

Is there a "common sized auger" based upon this machines HP, lift height, etc?

The holes I need to dig are going to be 9" to 12" in diameter and 30" to 36" deep as I need to use the cardboard cement tube to form a pole base with a curb which sticks up at least 9" to keep the lawn mower and grass trimmer cowboys and cow girls from damaging the bases of these posts as they are quite $$$......($600+ per post with all the die cast base covers, architectural detail, brackets, finials, etc.)..

Thanks for the details, since this is on the topic of 3ph post hole diggers, I hope the OP doesn't mind me adding some of my questions to their thread................thanks to all who reply.
 

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Yup, it works ok. I have drilled at least 100 holes (no exaggeration) with my Frontier PHD100. There are two schools of thought for using the phd on these little guys. I prefer to go full 540 PTO RPM and when I hear the engine start to bog and I will pull up on the phd so it doesn't screw itself into the ground. Others like to go slow and pull out when they start to bog, I've heard the slower method works better in rocky soils. The main problem is the auger likes to screw into the ground and the tractor doesn't have the power to pull the auger out of the ground or keep the auger from the pulling the tractor down. I have screwed the auger into the ground and have had to use a bigazz pipe wrench to unscrew the auger.
I was working part time at a YMCA camp. They had a JD 4310. I came in one morning and the boss said take a shovel and go dig out the post hole digger. He had left it stuck in the ground. Instead, I took the tractor, chain and 36" pipe wrench. I used the loader and chain to put "lift" on the PHD, and the pipe wrench to unscrew it.
 

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Is the 3 point PHD for the category 1 3ph on the 1 series a specific unit due to the limited lift height?

Am I correct that just any 3ph post hole auger won't work on the 1 series due to the lift height?

What about the angle of the PTO driveshaft? It would seem to be rather extreme at the auger digging starting position or when lifted out of the ground due to the length of the 3ph arms, is this correct?

Also, for those who have purchased a PHD for the 1 series machines, what is the cost for the unit with the PTO shaft and roughly how much are the augers each?

Is there a "common sized auger" based upon this machines HP, lift height, etc?

The holes I need to dig are going to be 9" to 12" in diameter and 30" to 36" deep as I need to use the cardboard cement tube to form a pole base with a curb which sticks up at least 9" to keep the lawn mower and grass trimmer cowboys and cow girls from damaging the bases of these posts as they are quite $$$......($600+ per post with all the die cast base covers, architectural detail, brackets, finials, etc.)..

Thanks for the details, since this is on the topic of 3ph post hole diggers, I hope the OP doesn't mind me adding some of my questions to their thread................thanks to all who reply.
How many holes do you need to dig? It might be cheaper to pay a contractor to dig them or rent a PHD. When I built my pole barn, I rented a PHD for the day used the 2030. I did have to buy an extension for the auger to get deep enough to meet code for frost in my area. IIRC I used an 18" auger

30" to 36" does not sound deep enough to me? :dunno:
 

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Is the 3 point PHD for the category 1 3ph on the 1 series a specific unit due to the limited lift height?

Am I correct that just any 3ph post hole auger won't work on the 1 series due to the lift height?

What about the angle of the PTO driveshaft? It would seem to be rather extreme at the auger digging starting position or when lifted out of the ground due to the length of the 3ph arms, is this correct?

Also, for those who have purchased a PHD for the 1 series machines, what is the cost for the unit with the PTO shaft and roughly how much are the augers each?

Is there a "common sized auger" based upon this machines HP, lift height, etc?

The holes I need to dig are going to be 9" to 12" in diameter and 30" to 36" deep as I need to use the cardboard cement tube to form a pole base with a curb which sticks up at least 9" to keep the lawn mower and grass trimmer cowboys and cow girls from damaging the bases of these posts as they are quite $$$......($600+ per post with all the die cast base covers, architectural detail, brackets, finials, etc.)..

Thanks for the details, since this is on the topic of 3ph post hole diggers, I hope the OP doesn't mind me adding some of my questions to their thread................thanks to all who reply.
SB, while the PHD100 is specifically made for the 1 series' limited cat 1 3ph, there are plenty of people using regular cat 1 PHD's, for example the County Line brand PHD from Tractor Supply. The PHD100 is considerably more expensive than the ones from TSC, as are the augers. I bought mine the same time I got my 1025r and just rolled it into the 0% financing. I don't remember how much I paid, but the County Line ones at my TSC seems to be about $550 without auger. The auger price depends on size, but at my TSC, it looks like a 6" is $140ish while a 12" is $180ish.

The Frontier augers are shorter than than ones from TS by about 6 inches, I think, but from what I hear, I believe people are using the TS augers successfully. The ones specifically for the PHD100 are 36 inches long, the TSC ones were 42 inches if I"m not mistaken. They do seem to be interchangeable in shaft size and bolt pattern, but that's just hearsay. I have very uneven ground and frequently end up dragging my auger on the ground every now and then, even though it is shorter than the TSC ones. The auger sizes from Frontier for the PHD100 are 6", 9" and 12". I don't believe they make them any bigger for the PHD100s. I'm not sure what sizes are available from other vendors or what the maximum reasonable size would be. I suspect 12" is about as big as I would try, but...


:focus: :mocking:
 

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Is the 3 point PHD for the category 1 3ph on the 1 series a specific unit due to the limited lift height?

Am I correct that just any 3ph post hole auger won't work on the 1 series due to the lift height?

What about the angle of the PTO driveshaft? It would seem to be rather extreme at the auger digging starting position or when lifted out of the ground due to the length of the 3ph arms, is this correct?

Also, for those who have purchased a PHD for the 1 series machines, what is the cost for the unit with the PTO shaft and roughly how much are the augers each?

Is there a "common sized auger" based upon this machines HP, lift height, etc?

The holes I need to dig are going to be 9" to 12" in diameter and 30" to 36" deep as I need to use the cardboard cement tube to form a pole base with a curb which sticks up at least 9" to keep the lawn mower and grass trimmer cowboys and cow girls from damaging the bases of these posts as they are quite $$$......($600+ per post with all the die cast base covers, architectural detail, brackets, finials, etc.)..

Thanks for the details, since this is on the topic of 3ph post hole diggers, I hope the OP doesn't mind me adding some of my questions to their thread................thanks to all who reply.
Yes the PHD is for the 1025, and others should fit. I have the 9 and 12 inch diameter, 36 inch long augers that I bought from Tractor Supply while they were on sale, I couldn't bring myself to pay what JD wanted for theirs. My PHD has a round 2 inch output which is very common, so finding augers isn't an issue. The only issue with buying augers is the length, my 1025 has to tiptoe around while one is installed, as the lift is just barely enough to keep it from dragging.
 

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I have seen alot of people break their cast top link on the 1025r from using Post Hole Diggers. Not sure if it was user error or JD design. I was looking at this one: Compact Tractor 3 Point Post Hole Digger
 

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we pretty much power drive most fence type posts these days........but i did drag out the old PHD this last week to dig some holes for a pole type equipment shed ..

we had a lot of moisture in the ground which made it very nice digging.....we have top soil...sometimes rocks....and clay soils

we drill them with our smallest tractor dont want to overpower the auger and it is easier to position ......
we go very slow..going slow and letting it turn a lot will either remove rocks or work them into the wall of the hole ...going fast the auger grabs and schears pins

i run my old auger at idle rpms...and control the height all the way down....very slow ...not in a hurry at all...

if we need to dig anything above 12" i just borrow or rent a hydraulic unit for my skidsteer......if we need deep holes we hire it done by a truck mounted rig

a 1025r should be just fine just dont get in a hurry
 

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How many holes do you need to dig? It might be cheaper to pay a contractor to dig them or rent a PHD. When I built my pole barn, I rented a PHD for the day used the 2030. I did have to buy an extension for the auger to get deep enough to meet code for frost in my area. IIRC I used an 18" auger

30" to 36" does not sound deep enough to me? :dunno:
Between street signs and some other posts, about 10 in the first project and then another 6 or 8 in the second project. They would be at two different times and since I am getting paid to perform the work, if I can use some of the $$$ to add a handy implement, I will consider it. I really try not to rent things which I likely will have a reoccurring need for, because of the hassle of renting, etc.

Much of it depends on the cost of the item. There seems to be very nice PHD options for the category 1 at under $800, so I will look further. Also, the PHD is one of those tools I think that if you own it, you will find more uses for it because of the convenience. I just helped the neighbor dig the basket ball pole hole and after watching the video of the PHD at work, what a difference in the time and effort.

36" is the hole depth specified by the sign post manufacture with the special Federal standard sign post "break away features".....based upon the size of pole being used. Everything from the height of the sign mounting, the size and fonts of the letters, the dimensions of the sign itself and several other details are dictated by the traffic speed on the road, the lanes of traffic and other such factors, which makes perfect sense.

One thing which is an eye opener is just how large the signs actually are in person and up close. Most people wouldn't think the average Yield sign is 36" in length on each leg of the triangle with the Yield signs when you are merging onto the highway being 60" x 60" x 60", that's a BIG sign with each leg being 5 foot in length. Since we normally see these things in passing in a vehicle, you never really give them much thought until you start planning to install road signs which comply with the law.

SB, while the PHD100 is specifically made for the 1 series' limited cat 1 3ph, there are plenty of people using regular cat 1 PHD's, for example the County Line brand PHD from Tractor Supply. The PHD100 is considerably more expensive than the ones from TSC, as are the augers. I bought mine the same time I got my 1025r and just rolled it into the 0% financing. I don't remember how much I paid, but the County Line ones at my TSC seems to be about $550 without auger. The auger price depends on size, but at my TSC, it looks like a 6" is $140ish while a 12" is $180ish.

The Frontier augers are shorter than than ones from TS by about 6 inches, I think, but from what I hear, I believe people are using the TS augers successfully. The ones specifically for the PHD100 are 36 inches long, the TSC ones were 42 inches if I"m not mistaken. They do seem to be interchangeable in shaft size and bolt pattern, but that's just hearsay. I have very uneven ground and frequently end up dragging my auger on the ground every now and then, even though it is shorter than the TSC ones. The auger sizes from Frontier for the PHD100 are 6", 9" and 12". I don't believe they make them any bigger for the PHD100s. I'm not sure what sizes are available from other vendors or what the maximum reasonable size would be. I suspect 12" is about as big as I would try, but....
Great information and what I was seeking. Thanks for posting.

Yes the PHD is for the 1025, and others should fit. I have the 9 and 12 inch diameter, 36 inch long augers that I bought from Tractor Supply while they were on sale, I couldn't bring myself to pay what JD wanted for theirs. My PHD has a round 2 inch output which is very common, so finding augers isn't an issue. The only issue with buying augers is the length, my 1025 has to tiptoe around while one is installed, as the lift is just barely enough to keep it from dragging.
I can see what you mean about tip toeing around, that is close in clearance. No question, Frontier gets premium money for their implements. While everything I have thus far is Frontier, the PHD is less of a brand concern to me so I would consider other brands.

Just got the country pro from fleet farm last weekend w/12" auger, whole set up was 550 dug like a champ may need an extension... whole unit weights about 225lbs.
$550 for the PHD with the 12" auger is a good price. Thanks for posting this information:good2:

Idea to keep the auger from screwing itself into the ground. Believe me, it works.

Auger Drilling Itself Into the Ground Fixed!!! 48 Post Hole Bit - YouTube
Well, that surely seems logical. Thanks for posting. Also, once you keep the base of the PHD frame from being past the flat plane by using the blocks, it permits the 3ph to lift it right out. I can imagine that backing one of the augers out with a persuader and using "arm strong" techniques would be something to avoid.....:laugh:
 

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Between street signs and some other posts, about 10 in the first project and then another 6 or 8 in the second project. They would be at two different times and since I am getting paid to perform the work, if I can use some of the $$$ to add a handy implement, I will consider it. I really try not to rent things which I likely will have a reoccurring need for, because of the hassle of renting, etc.

Much of it depends on the cost of the item. There seems to be very nice PHD options for the category 1 at under $800, so I will look further. Also, the PHD is one of those tools I think that if you own it, you will find more uses for it because of the convenience. I just helped the neighbor dig the basket ball pole hole and after watching the video of the PHD at work, what a difference in the time and effort.

36" is the hole depth specified by the sign post manufacture with the special Federal standard sign post "break away features".....based upon the size of pole being used. Everything from the height of the sign mounting, the size and fonts of the letters, the dimensions of the sign itself and several other details are dictated by the traffic speed on the road, the lanes of traffic and other such factors, which makes perfect sense.

One thing which is an eye opener is just how large the signs actually are in person and up close. Most people wouldn't think the average Yield sign is 36" in length on each leg of the triangle with the Yield signs when you are merging onto the highway being 60" x 60" x 60", that's a BIG sign with each leg being 5 foot in length. Since we normally see these things in passing in a vehicle, you never really give them much thought until you start planning to install road signs which comply with the law.



Great information and what I was seeking. Thanks for posting.



I can see what you mean about tip toeing around, that is close in clearance. No question, Frontier gets premium money for their implements. While everything I have thus far is Frontier, the PHD is less of a brand concern to me so I would consider other brands.



$550 for the PHD with the 12" auger is a good price. Thanks for posting this information:good2:



Well, that surely seems logical. Thanks for posting. Also, once you keep the base of the PHD frame from being past the flat plane by using the blocks, it permits the 3ph to lift it right out. I can imagine that backing one of the augers out with a persuader and using "arm strong" techniques would be something to avoid.....:laugh:
I was guessing street lights, not signs, when I suspected 36" was not deep enough. IIRC, when I built my pole barn and when I put posts in for my deck, code said 42" minimum. I went deeper to be sure. The Inspector to one look and said "I don't need to measure these" He also told me a lot of guys do not go deep enough, but swear they are until he shows them with a tape measure.

Want to "rent" my Bush Hog PHD? I would have to check, but IIRC Model 2402. You will probably want to buy an auger, I think mine is 18" ?:unknown::unknown:
 

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I would be very very leery of that 6x6 blocking under the lift arms technique. While it appears brilliant, look at the PHD arm going to the top link and watch the back of the tractor. The PHD arm is being pulled down with tremendous leverage. It's being bent, it's prying up on the top link. And it's lifting the whole back of tractor off the ground by the top link. If that hung up on a rock instead of loose dirt, it would probably break something expensive. The shear bolts wouldn't even pop right away because the auger is turning just fine like a lag bolt.

I broke the cast iron top link clevis on my 1026r trying to hook up a PHD the wrong way. So I can absolutely assure you they can break and it will be a very dangerous failure. That hunk of cast iron clevis under thousands of pounds of pressure will fly and kill whatever it hits.
 

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1025r engine shot 200 hrs

Hi, new here didnt know where else to turn. 2015 1025r with 200 hrs on it and 6 months out of warranty . Not a mechanic at all .. engine started clunking than broke loose spraying gray oil everywhere.
I guess just looking for advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
we pretty much power drive most fence type posts these days........but i did drag out the old PHD this last week to dig some holes for a pole type equipment shed ..

we had a lot of moisture in the ground which made it very nice digging.....we have top soil...sometimes rocks....and clay soils

we drill them with our smallest tractor dont want to overpower the auger and it is easier to position ......
we go very slow..going slow and letting it turn a lot will either remove rocks or work them into the wall of the hole ...going fast the auger grabs and schears pins

i run my old auger at idle rpms...and control the height all the way down....very slow ...not in a hurry at all...

if we need to dig anything above 12" i just borrow or rent a hydraulic unit for my skidsteer......if we need deep holes we hire it done by a truck mounted rig

a 1025r should be just fine just dont get in a hurry
With my old Ford2000 i just run at 1400rpm and let it take its time. Sometimes it takes a while but it gets the job done. The 1025r is so tiny my lawnmower even has more HP. Wonder if i could use my old PH digger with the 1025?

Thanks for the input
 

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With my old Ford2000 i just run at 1400rpm and let it take its time. Sometimes it takes a while but it gets the job done. The 1025r is so tiny my lawnmower even has more HP. Wonder if i could use my old PH digger with the 1025?

Thanks for the input

in my opinion these tractor PHD are not high production units....it would be easy to put one behind a 100+ hp tractor hit a rock and keep schearing pins or worse......and compared to a 2 man handheld a 1025 would be a dream to run.....

i put mine behind a JD 4500 (33ptohp)and let it(the tractor engine) turn at about 1200rpms...and control the down slowly ...i would never let one screw into the ground.

my neighbor uses one with a little Kubota ...dont know the size but the PHD is bigger than the tractor and it works just fine..

i think your on the right track and would be pleased with the results if you take your time
 

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I would be very very leery of that 6x6 blocking under the lift arms technique. While it appears brilliant, look at the PHD arm going to the top link and watch the back of the tractor. The PHD arm is being pulled down with tremendous leverage. It's being bent, it's prying up on the top link. And it's lifting the whole back of tractor off the ground by the top link. If that hung up on a rock instead of loose dirt, it would probably break something expensive. The shear bolts wouldn't even pop right away because the auger is turning just fine like a lag bolt.

I broke the cast iron top link clevis on my 1026r trying to hook up a PHD the wrong way. So I can absolutely assure you they can break and it will be a very dangerous failure. That hunk of cast iron clevis under thousands of pounds of pressure will fly and kill whatever it hits.
LOL, I was just going to post exactly what you said, I was cringing :crazy: watching that boom flex as the auger kept drilling into the ground! It also appears that the guy in the video doesn't know how to run his equipment, it sounded like he was engaging the PTO way above idle, which isn't good for both the tractor and implement.:dunno:
 
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