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I usually have it at idle or a little above. I can't find anything in the manual. Any benefit to higher rpm other than moving a little quicker?
 

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My 1025 is 4 or 5 yrs old, believe manual calls for 22-2500 ..

from manual for my 260

omlvu23711_h0
 

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Hi, I run mine at an idle. I think that I remember seeing that break out doesn't change with a higher rpm, but I'm sure that boom swing might. I can get into more than enough trouble at idle.
 

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Engine speed doesn’t affect the hydraulic pressure. The backhoe will have the same digging force at idle as it does with the throttle wide open. What changes with engine rpm is the gallons per minute the pump produces. The faster the engine rpm, the quicker the pump operates and quicker the cylinders will fill, resulting in more “responsive” hydraulics. Slow the engine down and the hydraulics will operate more slowly. But even at idle the backhoe will dig just as well, albiet at a more leisurely pace.

I’ll typically start at idle until I’m used to the controls, then speed it up a bit. There is a certain point for each operator where the controls will feel too fast or touchy and for each operator it will be different. Start slow and ramp up the speed as you are comfortable. If the backhoe feels touchy or the movements are too quick, slow the rpms down.

It’s really just a balancing act. Slow rpm means more precision but at a slower digging speed. High rpm means a faster digging speed but with less precise movements.

The only limitation on rpm that I recall is to keep it under 2400 on a hot day so the hydraulic system doesn’t build too much heat.
 

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Idle will dig, but you will definitely get a power increase by bumping up 300 rpms or so. I have tried both and there is a difference. It’s not huge one, but every bit helps.

I personally like between 2000 and 2200. Once you get the controls down you will want as much speed as you can get. Dual movements are possible but takes finesse. Be sure to feather the boom when you bring it up or it might scare you when it hits the stops ?
 

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Thanks all. I'm getting good results around 2100.
I like 2100-2200 myself. Seems to be a smooth spot with reduced engine vibration and plenty of hydraulic flow.
 

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Engine speed doesn’t affect the hydraulic pressure. The backhoe will have the same digging force at idle as it does with the throttle wide open. What changes with engine rpm is the gallons per minute the pump produces. The faster the engine rpm, the quicker the pump operates and quicker the cylinders will fill, resulting in more “responsive” hydraulics. Slow the engine down and the hydraulics will operate more slowly. But even at idle the backhoe will dig just as well, albiet at a more leisurely pace.

I’ll typically start at idle until I’m used to the controls, then speed it up a bit. There is a certain point for each operator where the controls will feel too fast or touchy and for each operator it will be different. Start slow and ramp up the speed as you are comfortable. If the backhoe feels touchy or the movements are too quick, slow the rpms down.

It’s really just a balancing act. Slow rpm means more precision but at a slower digging speed. High rpm means a faster digging speed but with less precise movements.

The only limitation on rpm that I recall is to keep it under 2400 on a hot day so the hydraulic system doesn’t build too much heat.
While I agree for the most part, digging at 2000 rather than idle has allowed me to lift and move larger tree stumps.

Re the hot weather operation, this is a good point. THANKS
 

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I agree with the 2000 to 2200 range. I have ran mine as hight as 2500 but when you raise the boom and hit the stop at that high rpm it is not really pleasant. I have not found any need to be higher than 2200.
 

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I run mine slightly above idle. No way I'm listening to a screaming diesel will digging. It's also much smoother, a little slower but who cares :unknown:
 

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You probably won’t notice a huge difference if you are just digging in dirt, but I tend to run mine around 2000 or a touch higher. I find it nicer to use higher rpms and just crack into the controls for smoother movements as opposed to running it at an idle and having to use larger movements, and as someone mentioned the ability to multi-function with higher rpms and smaller movements/finessing of the controls. Having done some stump digging up/ removal and also using my backhoe with my bxpanded thumb to move a downed tree that I limbed and cut the trunk into sizeable 3-4 foot pieces, that kind of work required me to use a higher rpm range in order to lift any kind of weight, having to get tricky between using the boom vs. stick vs. bucket curl to get some pieces high enough off the ground to transport to the tree line at the back of my property. I don’t know if it matters or not but my 1025r has the 260b backhoe, which may respond differently to the 260.


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Not sure how it relates...but.

On my Kubota u-15 mini ex...similar powered.

If in a tight spot and want "control"[email protected] idle

Doing trench work or moving big piles of dirt..I ramp it up to max....there is no tach:flag_of_truce:..its rabbit oR snail.
 

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Not sure how it relates...but.

On my Kubota u-15 mini ex...similar powered.

If in a tight spot and want "control"[email protected] idle

Doing trench work or moving big piles of dirt..I ramp it up to max....there is no tach:flag_of_truce:..its rabbit oR snail.
That the way I do it as well:cheers: The fumes and heat sort of temper my RPM's
 
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