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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

New poster here. This seems like a great community :).

My wife and I just purchased 10acres outside the city. It has a gentle slope, and about 2/3rds of it is cleared with grass/brush growing.

I'm new to living in the countryside. I've been in suburbs my whole life (I'm 32). Been reading a bit on various projects we'd like to tackle -- mowing around 7 acres of brush/grass, putting down new gravel on the driveway, grading some of the land to plant some crops. Rather quickly decided that a tractor is probably the right tool to have around to get these jobs done in a timely manner. (My wife thinks I'm a bit crazy though, our discussion went from a lawn mower to riding mower to tractor pretty quickly).

So we went to look at the JD 1025R last weekend. The dealer had them put next to a row of 3-family tractors, so the 1-series looked really small in comparison :). I really liked the 1025R TLB, it seems like a pretty good package, especially since I'll need to put down some french drains to address various drainage issues we have, as well as dig some trenches to run electrical out to a shed, so the backhoe seem like it would come in handy.

My question is if a 1025R is a good "beginner" tractor -- or do you think I should get a riding mower first, get used to that, before getting a tractor? Even though it's the smallest tractor JD has, still seems like a serious piece of equipment to have.

The dealer here has a sale on the 1025R TLB right now -- $19,929. That seems like a pretty good deal, considering I see used ones going for around 16-18K. Getting 0% financing on top of that makes it pretty attractive.

Anyway, any advice/tips would be appreciated. Thanks!
 

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If it's affordable to you and you have a bunch of projects you want to tackle then buy it.:good2:
I wish they were available when i was your age because i should of bought a tractor long before i eventually did in my late 40's.

There's one thing the folks here at GTT are good at besides the great advice, it's spending your money.:laugh:
 

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:wgtt:OH-YEAH-WE CAN HELP YA SPEND UR :gizmo:
 

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:wgtt: from Texas !!! Go for it , I bought my 1025R without the backhoe and regretted it shortly afterwards . These tractors are awesome and really retain their value in case you want to upgrade later on . :gizmo:
... and we really like pics !!! Good luck with whatever you decide on .:cheers:
 

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These tractors are indeed serious pieces of equipment but are extremely easy to operate. You will be "used to" the tractor just as quickly as you will be used to a garden or lawn tractor. I believe if you already have the 1 series on your mind then anything less will have you regretting the purchase of it rapidly. Might as well get what you want now than loose a few dollars with a trade that most likely will come sooner than later, I and several others have already been there and done that. The 1 series is an excellent beginner machine IMO that will not only be excellent at beginning with, it's capable of being the only tractor many folks will need for the next 20+ years.
 

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I do believe the 1 series tractors are a great starting tractor. I think you are going to find out rather quickly that you will soon out grow it in a short time. Especially with the projects you have in mind along with the acreage you plan on tending. To be honest, if you can swing a 2 series with a BH you would be better off and it will do anything you put in front of it. While I think the 1 series is great, I had two of them, I just really feel you will out grow it in a short time. Spend big now and not regret it later.
 

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From the work you have planned- ditching, trenching, backfilling, and grading that stuff is going to cost you thousands to pay someone else to do it.
These machines pay for their depreciation very quickly.
 

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Buy it, we all started somewhere.
 

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Agree with the others. Get the 1025R TLB!
Check out our videos on YouTube (see my signature). These should help you answer questions on the tractor's usefulness and capability.
 

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That's a pretty good price. While the 1 series is small, you'll be surprised by what it can do. I haven't been able to stop mine yet in almost 300 hours of runtime. Later on you might have a need for something bigger, but a 1025r TLB is cheaper than a 2 series. Plus it's smaller and more nimble, allowing it to get into areas that a bigger tractor might not fit. Only regret I have with mine is not buying the backhoe. Have tried to convince the financial department I need the backhoe but no luck so far. Watch the YouTube videos that GTT member Timmarks has, he's the guy that posted one before me. Search on YouTube for Tractor Time with Tim and you can get a good feel for what a 1025r TLB can do. You won't regret it.


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Hi all,

My question is if a 1025R is a good "beginner" tractor -- or do you think I should get a riding mower first, get used to that, before getting a tractor? Even though it's the smallest tractor JD has, still seems like a serious piece of equipment to have.

The dealer here has a sale on the 1025R TLB right now -- $19,929. That seems like a pretty good deal, considering I see used ones going for around 16-18K. Getting 0% financing on top of that makes it pretty attractive.

Anyway, any advice/tips would be appreciated. Thanks!

Yes, the 1025R is a good beginner tractor (from one beginner to another), but I think if I were buying today, I'd look really hard at the newly redesigned (2017) 2-series and I'd pay for the quick disconnect hydraulic hoses for the Front End Loader (FEL). The 2032 (2017) is pretty sweet. Sometimes with the 1025R I just wish the hydraulics were a little stronger...mainly the force of the backhoe.

Plus even on a slight slope, the additional width helps with stability.

I'm just saying, if you have the means, take a look. If not, you'll be very happy with the 1025R...even despite what I said above, I'm very happy with it. This weekend, I told my wife "I love my tractor" as I was unloading 50 lb bags of drainage rock from my truck. I put them in the FEL (10 at a time) and I was able to dump them very close to where I would be emptying them. Without the tractor, I would've had to park my truck on my grass, toss out 10 here, move the truck, toss out 10 there, move the truck...etc.

Whatever your decision, your life will be easier with a TLB.
 

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bigger and smaller

I purchased a 3032E 9 months ago and am imagining bigger AND smaller. The 1 series looks nice because it is small enough to get to places my 3032E will not. I may be developing a tractor addiction.
 

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Congrats on the new property!! It's going to be a big change being on 7 acres if you've lived in a city most of your life. You'll never be able to go back to the city!!

I think you'll be happy with whatever you get!! As timmarks' videos show, that little tractor is super capable of doing a LOT of work!! But, I think that Zeke_in_SC also gave you some good advice to look at the next size up tractor. If you can afford it, I'd lean towards that. While you'll be happy with the smaller tractor, there's a pretty good chance that you'll be happier with the larger one!

If your wife is going to spend time on the tractor, be sure to get her to take a spin on the bigger one. She'll find that it's super easy to drive and she'll like that "up high" feeling of the larger tractor if she drives an SUV.

The larger framed tractor also gives you some extra options for implements on the rear. The smaller framed tractor sits low, so anything that's on the 3 point hitch on the rear will have less ground clearance than on the next size up tractor. That was something that was pointed out to me by the salesman when I bought my tractor. It was something that I hadn't thought of. This will come into play when you hook up a rear blade, a post hole digger, a plow, etc.

Make sure you discuss you "property plans" with the salesperson. He can make sure that you get the implements you'll need and you can roll them into the 0% financing. Even though you don't realize it now, you're going to want some forks for the front loader. I didn't know it when I bought my tractor, but after I had to borrow a set to unload a chipper that I bought, I woke up. I bought forks and now they're on my tractor more than my bucket. Most guys that have forks say the same thing.

Be sure you post here what the guy is telling you to buy so we can all weigh in. As was mentioned earlier - we love helping to spend other peoples money!

Are you planning on mowing all 7 acres? If so, that's where the larger tractor might come into play. You can put a bigger deck on the larger tractor. That will cut your mowing time down. I know that spending all that time mowing sounds like fun now, but it can get a little tedious after a couple of hours. And, at some point your wife is going to be waiting on you to finish the mowing so you can take her out to a nice dinner in exchange for her letting you buy the JD. LOL!

I have just a bit less than 5 acres (only mow less than 1 acre). I started out looking at the 1-Series Deeres. A salesperson wisely talked me into looking at the 2-Series for what I wanted to do on my property. Then I ended up buying a 3-Series that I found a decent deal on. Would I have been happy with the 1-Series? Probably. Am I happy with my 3-Series? Definitely!!

There's a frequent saying on the tractor boards.... Nobody ever says "I wish I had bought a smaller tractor" :laugh:

Enjoy the purchase process. It's all part of the fun!! :good2:
 

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Hi all,

New poster here. This seems like a great community
.

My wife and I just purchased 10acres outside the city. It has a gentle slope, and about 2/3rds of it is cleared with grass/brush growing.

I'm new to living in the countryside. I've been in suburbs my whole life (I'm 32). Been reading a bit on various projects we'd like to tackle -- mowing around 7 acres of brush/grass, putting down new gravel on the driveway, grading some of the land to plant some crops. Rather quickly decided that a tractor is probably the right tool to have around to get these jobs done in a timely manner. (My wife thinks I'm a bit crazy though, our discussion went from a lawn mower to riding mower to tractor pretty quickly).

So we went to look at the JD 1025R last weekend. The dealer had them put next to a row of 3-family tractors, so the 1-series looked really small in comparison
. I really liked the 1025R TLB, it seems like a pretty good package, especially since I'll need to put down some french drains to address various drainage issues we have, as well as dig some trenches to run electrical out to a shed, so the backhoe seem like it would come in handy.

My question is if a 1025R is a good "beginner" tractor -- or do you think I should get a riding mower first, get used to that, before getting a tractor? Even though it's the smallest tractor JD has, still seems like a serious piece of equipment to have.

The dealer here has a sale on the 1025R TLB right now -- $19,929. That seems like a pretty good deal, considering I see used ones going for around 16-18K. Getting 0% financing on top of that makes it pretty attractive.

Anyway, any advice/tips would be appreciated. Thanks!
Decent price and definitely get the backhoe

If you have obstacles to mow around or get between for your other work, or need to do work in close to structures the 1025 will be easier to get into those tight spots. The implements are also cheaper. The 2 series is a much bigger framed tractor but only gets you a couple hundred extra pounds of front end loader lift. If
you need bigger than a 1025 then go with a 3 series - the 2 series just isn't a huge step up in capabilities.

I strongly recommend getting the single point hydraulic connection on whatever you choose
- it's an aftermarket option using John Deere parts. It makes loader on off much simpler and you'll probably want loader off for mowing.
 

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reimhagen, Welcome to GTT.

As others have stated, buy the tractor. You'll thank us later.
Make sure the deal includes a ballast box, get a set of aftermarket forks and you'll never look back.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Wow, thanks for all the replies! I see what you mean by everyone here is good at spending my money :).

I'll take a quick look at the 2-series, but I think trying to upsell my wife past what I've already done will be difficult. Based on what I've seen, they hold their value pretty well, so even after a few years if I want to upgrade it seems I'll "only" be out a couple thousand. (Still a bit of money, but nothing compared to how quickly cars depreciate).

Quick question about implements -- I was thinking about starting with a post-hole digger and maybe either a box blade or a rear blade. For the latter, any opinion about which one will be more useful for 1) grading/re-gravelling a driveway and 2) levelling land for tilling/planting? We don't get much snow here so I don't anticipate needing to plow snow often. Anything else that you guys use rear or box blades for?

Thanks again!
 

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Wow, thanks for all the replies! I see what you mean by everyone here is good at spending my money :).

I'll take a quick look at the 2-series, but I think trying to upsell my wife past what I've already done will be difficult. Based on what I've seen, they hold their value pretty well, so even after a few years if I want to upgrade it seems I'll "only" be out a couple thousand. (Still a bit of money, but nothing compared to how quickly cars depreciate).

Quick question about implements -- I was thinking about starting with a post-hole digger and maybe either a box blade or a rear blade. For the latter, any opinion about which one will be more useful for 1) grading/re-gravelling a driveway and 2) levelling land for tilling/planting? We don't get much snow here so I don't anticipate needing to plow snow often. Anything else that you guys use rear or box blades for?

Thanks again!
You might be surprised about the depreciation in the first few years, I sold my x758 two years after I bought it at significant loss. After that the depreciation starts to level off

I would get a box blade for what you're talking about

Also - if you need to drive a lot of post holes you'll probably appreciate the ground clearance of a 2 series or larger - there's just more maneuvering of the actual auger with a 1 series tractor, less ground clearance. A lot of guys with the backhoe say they don't really need a post hole digger. Now if you're sinking 100 post holes you might appreciate having the PHD...
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Agree with the others. Get the 1025R TLB!
Check out our videos on YouTube (see my signature). These should help you answer questions on the tractor's usefulness and capability.
Wow, it's the famous Tim from Tractor Time with Tim! We actually were watching your videos on youtube just last week while eating dinner :). Didn't expect to come across a celebrity on here.
 

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With a post hole digger take a serious look at the 2 series. I have a 1025 and love it its pleanty for me. Good luck and weclome to the forum. we will spend your money for you :gizmo::gizmo:
 

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People are telling you to go bigger...I wouldn't do that, not unless you want to own two machines.

Going smaller is a waste of time and money, as others have said.

I'm not a tractor expert, but I do a lot with my 1025r and I've owned other machines, and have used larger tractors, so here are my thoughts.

If you want to just own one machine, for most people under the most common circumstances, it has to be a 1025r(or a 1023e, whichever). When you go smaller, you lose too much capability so it's not even worth discussing. The only exception is the x700 series, if you get the AWD Diesels, but you have to spend so much money to get it to the same level and use aftermarket loaders and jury rig a back hoe (if you want one) and it's just not worth it.

When you go bigger, you lose things. For example, going up to the new 2 series or a Kubota B adds a lot of weight and takes away maneuverability and being able to fit in small places, not just for storage, but getting round your property. It also hurts mowing, and not just turn radius wise (unless you have flat dry open fields, then it's awesome). For example, we've had a lot of rain and the ground is still saturated, and I can't mow half my property with the 1025r because it tears the grass right out and turns it into a mud pit. It's heavy. A new 2 series weighs about half a ton more. An x300 or x570 garden tractor would be able to mow those areas with no problems at all right now, but I don't have one of those so I have to wait. But a 2 series? I'd be waiting much longer just to get it there without destroying everything.

You do get more capability. There won't be anything new you'd be able to do, but you could do the same things a lot faster. So if you're thinking of a larger tractor, and your land is not flat and dry, you'd need a lawn or garden tractor for mowing (or a zero turn).

Another thing...unless you really want one or think you'll have use for one on a regular basis, don't buy a back hoe. It will be a pain to store and it will mostly just sit there. If you need one for a day or two every couple of years, Home Depot rents small excavators for 400 a day (24 hours), and they are more capable than a 1 series back hoe. If you think you will use it a lot, get it. If you actually need one, it's a great thing to have. A loader is different, even if you don't think you need a loader, you will want/need a loader. Unlike a backhoe, it has dozens of uses.

What you do want to buy are a box blade if you want to build or maintain a dirt/gravel driveway, pallet forks (with frame) for the loader arms, a rotary cutter if you want to clear fields of brush and weed, a landscape rake or back blade, a snow blower or front blade (depending on where you live) and an iMatch quick coupler.

So if money is an object, and you don't think you'll need a back hoe on a regular basis, you can finance those things into the purchase. You can always rent the excavator and plant all the trees you want in a day.
 
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