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Discussion Starter #1
Howdy folks, I've already read quite a bit here, lots of good information.

My problem is that I have a 1025R with 15 hours on it. Actually it's my step dad's but he's kinda clueless about this stuff and asked me to figure it out.

Anyway, I borrowed it to clear some downed trees, and on my second load (front end loader) noticed a big puddle of fluid where I had dropped the previous wood. I pulled onto a flat surface and checked it out. There was a bolt on a line that was so loose I could turn it with my fingers. I tightened it with a wrench and stopped the leak.

After thinking about it a bit, I began to wonder how much had leaked out. So I let it sit and cool before checking, and there was ZERO fluid on the dipstick. The bucket has been on for the entire 15 hours, along with a rear bush hog, so the hydraulics have definitely had a workout.

I'm not sure what to do next.

We have a local dealership and this is the second tractor he has purchased from them. IMO this is 100 percent the fault of either the dealer or whoever assembled the thing (I have no idea how they arrive at the dealership).

Thinking I need to:
1) Be there to witness the removal of the fluid and see how much is left.
2) Check the filter and magnets to see how many filings are present.
3) Insist that at a minimum they do all that for free and refill the reservoir
4) Potentially ask for a new system???

How much of a stink should I make over this?
 

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Welcome to GTT he's gone.
My thoughts, I'd call the dealer and ask them what you should do, it will now be on record. They will probably tell you to add some fluid, which we all know but the point is let them tell you. I would guess you would be fine by just adding oil. Keep track of how much you put in and if you do, let us know.
Issues may be break-in oil.
 

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Thinking I need to:
1) Be there to witness the removal of the fluid and see how much is left.
2) Check the filter and magnets to see how many filings are present.
3) Insist that at a minimum they do all that for free and refill the reservoir
4) Potentially ask for a new system???

How much of a stink should I make over this?
Keep in mind what I'm about to say is my opinion and my opinion only. It doesn't mean anything nor is it worth anything. :lol:


(answered in order of the questions posed)

1. No need to drain. Chances are they installed the loader but didn't top off the reservoir. This is very common on new tractors. The loader comes with no fluid in the system and takes a bit to fill all of the cylinders and hoses. after running it for a few hours the fluid level will be low. Get a gallon of fluid and top it off. Record how much it takes. If it need more than a gallon, it was probably due to the leak. Unless you heard funny noises and the tractor failed to work, it's very doubtful you have any real damage.

2. Wait until your 50 hour mark indicated by the Owner's Manual. Let the tractor get it's full break-in period before changing the fluid/filter and cleaning screens. Otherwise you're just flushing out very expensive, but good fluid.

3. You can ask, but i wouldn't hold your breath.

4. You'd be better off asking for a new tractor. The hydraulic system is very complex and is everywhere on the tractor. Almost every system on the tractor is affected by the hydraulic system. But again, I seriously doubt you have any real problems. See answer #1.


Don't worry. Your tractor has a warranty and is pretty robust. These aren't your normal flimsy box store lawn mowers. You didn't mention any real symptoms or issues other than the leak itself. Stuff happens sometimes. Talk to the dealer and let them know what happened. Get your gallon of Low-Vis HyGard and top it off. See what goes on. If it acts funny, let us know. We'll get you squared away.:thumbup1gif:


Oh, and
:wgtt:
 

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:wgtt:

Glad to have you hear! Hate that you had a leak, but the good news is that it sounds like a pretty simple one. Occasionally hydraulic fittings work loose, it's the most common when they're new. Sounds like that's what happened to you. It's not a big deal at all. :good2:

You may already be aware, but when you check the hydraulic fluid level make sure the loader and three point hitch are both all the way down, shut the tractor off and let it sit for a few minutes to allow the level to stabilize. Fill as necessary, just keep track of how much you have to put in. These are tough machines and I would be very, very surprised if anything was damaged from what you described. Now, if you ran the fluid completely dry and kept trying to use it something could be harmed, but if that had happened the machine would have stopped moving, the loader would have stopped working, and you would have heard the pump pulling air; it makes a screaming noise that you can't miss. Even then, you would have to keep it like that for an extended amount of time to really hurt anything.

Sounds like you caught it quickly, fixed it properly, and just need to add some oil. You can call the dealer and let them know, I think it would be fair if they offered to give you a couple of gallons of hydraulic fluid to refill it. I wouldn't expect much more than that, because it sounds like this was just a little ump in the road and not a major failure. There's no reason to expect it to turn into a major failure later, sounds like y'all caught it early and fixed it instead of just ignoring it. :thumbup1gif:
 

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Keep in mind what I'm about to say is my opinion and my opinion only. It doesn't mean anything nor is it worth anything. :lol:

...

Stuff happens sometimes. Talk to the dealer and let them know what happened. Get your gallon of Low-Vis HyGard and top it off. See what goes on. If it acts funny, let us know. We'll get you squared away.:thumbup1gif:


Oh, and
:wgtt:
Hey! Quit typing while I'm typing! :laugh:

All kidding aside, I've fixed three hydraulic leaks this week. One was even a simple loose fitting, just like you had. Clean up the mess, tighten the fitting, refill and you should be all set. :good2:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Oh, and
:wgtt:
Thanks.

We have a gallon of fluid and I feel confident it was topped off after the loader was hooked up. I'll ask the other guy that drives it (yes, my step dad doesn't even drive it, his loss :p) if he topped it off.

I did shut it down for a bit before moving it up to the flat part of the drive. When starting it back up and moving it there was a whirring/grinding that I don't think the previous model had. I don't have anytime in the saddle on this one so I can't say if it was unusual or not.

The one puddle was at least 4 ounces, and there was a trail of oil from one side of the yard to the other, If I had to guess, probably 8 to 10 ounces leaked out in 5-10 minutes of use. Multiply that by 15 hours and thats where I start to worry.

Looks like this thing holds 13 quarts, or just over 3 gallons.

After adding more fluid, where do you say, this just ain't right?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You may already be aware, but when you check the hydraulic fluid level make sure the loader and three point hitch are both all the way down, shut the tractor off and let it sit for a few minutes to allow the level to stabilize.
yup.

It might not have been caught at all except that I had it out on the road and noticed the spill. Out at "the hill" there's nothing but scraggly trees and crabgrass. Thing even sits out back of the shed on the dirt all year.

Thanks again for talking me down. It's not that big of a deal for me to take care of, but I'd had to look like a jerk for no good reason.
 

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After adding more fluid, where do you say, this just ain't right?
If you're asking how much missing fluid it takes to create a real problem, in your case I wouldn't worry about it. Before any damage could really be done, the tractor would've stopped lifting, moving, etc. That didn't happen, so even if it takes two and a half gallons to refill (I'd bet it's less than that though) I wouldn't be overly concerned.

If you're asking how many problems you have to have for the machine to be considered junk or swapped out for a new one, I'd say you're in very safe territory. As far as breakdowns go, this was a very minor one. Odds are the hose was just twisted a bit, and the pressure cycles of being used caused it to work a little loose. The hydraulic system operates at a pretty high pressure, it doesn't take much loosening for a leak to start. If you had continual problems then it might be an issue, but the one you've had is very minor. :drinks:
 

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I'm with 56FordGuy, the fitting probably came loose as you were using it, and hasn't been leaking as long as you think it was. I just had to tighten a fitting on the FEL on my 2520 a month or two ago. I wouldn't have even noticed it was leaking except for all the red snow. :laugh:

I used to have an old Waldon loader. It had a lot of hydraulic leaks. I would run it until it wouldn't move, or the bucket wouldn't raise, then dump 3 or 4 gallons of hydraulic fluid in it. It ran like this for years with no problems.

The hydraulic systems are fairly robust. Overheating them or never changing the fluid is worse than running them low on fluid.
 

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WELCOME to GTT, He's gone!

Had a couple hydraulic leaks on my 1026r 54 front plow. I think "the phone rang" when it was being assembled at the dealer. Actually it was the only way I'd have known that all those streaks on my blacktop would go away after a few weeks...

If you want to make that fluid a bit more visible...
JD Part Number: MT3668
FLUID, HYDRAULIC OIL DYE

...about $4.00 a bottle.
 

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Keep in mind what I'm about to say is my opinion and my opinion only. It doesn't mean anything nor is it worth anything. :lol:
That goes for me too!:good2:
 

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I had a line come loose after a year or so. I topped off the fluid,,,checked the stick and continued on my way. I have added checking the hydraulic mlines to my to do list on a seasonal item.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
If you're asking how much missing fluid it takes to create a real problem, in your case I wouldn't worry about it. Before any damage could really be done, the tractor would've stopped lifting, moving, etc. That didn't happen, so even if it takes two and a half gallons to refill (I'd bet it's less than that though) I wouldn't be overly concerned.
Yes that's is what I was asking. Since starting this thread (and from what was said earlier) I realize that many of the systems run off the hydraulic system. Knowing that now, it makes sense that if things were too bad I would have seen some kind of issue where things stopped working.

His last JD, i think it was a 2305, went in for service last fall and they said they needed to do 3-4 thousand dollars in transmission work. Knowing that kind of made me more cautious about this one running low on fluid, even though I don't think anything like this came up with the other tractor.

Going to take it to the dealer this morning and see what they can do. If nothing else, I will get them to make a note of it on the service records. Thanks for the help, I'll report back between ACC Tournament games this afternoon.
 

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I'm sure they will make things right. A couple gals of hygard isnt worth losing a customer and having yur dealer name smeared across the internet!
I dont think you hurt the machine. It would have to completely run out of fluid for that. No steering, no drive, lots of noise. Yur fine.
Just calmly explain what happened to the service mgr. I wouldnt wait long... getting to be busy here in NC!
While we're on the subject... It is the operators job to check before operation for leaks and low fluids. Also during operation... check, listen, look. If it doesnt sound, look, feel right (different) then something may be wrong. Cease operations until you know for sure all is well. After operating, take a look around. Leaks, fluids again, debris crammed into places it shouldnt be ect. Clean the screens, deck ect. Also debris can and will catch fire. A hot tractor crammed full of dry grass and pine needles is just asking to burn down yur shop or worse yur garage attached to yur house.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
So, it took about 7/8 of a gallon to get it up near the full mark. I do think it was making less of a whirring noise when full.

After filling it up and riding around on it the last couple of days, I've come to the conclusion that the cold/warm cycle of weather we've been having probably caused the leak. Or at least made it worse. I'm guessing I was the first to drive it all winter. Which leads me to the comment below...

While we're on the subject... It is the operators job to check before operation for leaks and low fluids. Also during operation... check, listen, look. If it doesnt sound, look, feel right (different) then something may be wrong. Cease operations until you know for sure all is well. After operating, take a look around. Leaks, fluids again, debris crammed into places it shouldnt be ect. Clean the screens, deck ect. Also debris can and will catch fire. A hot tractor crammed full of dry grass and pine needles is just asking to burn down yur shop or worse yur garage attached to yur house.
I'm going to take this event as a reason to better understand the ins and outs of this machine. I had asked about maintenance on that last tractor but my questions were always kind of dodged. That was back when I was getting to know my new step dad (that's hard to type for someone who lost his real dad as an adult, getting a step dad at 38 is just weird LOL). Now that I know better how his mind works I'll probably just be more proactive on keeping it up. He's not really a "gentleman farmer", but I've never seen him drive, or even sit on this tractor. He and a buddy work out on this piece of property nearly every weekend in the summer, I'm not sure either one of them are in-charge of making sure it is properly maintained.

I'm very much a DIY kind of guy, so learning more about it will be a good project. I already have the owners manual on my coffee table.

Thanks for your help folks, glad I didn't waltz in to the shop and start making demands!


edit: speaking of debris, I did save the last tractor from burning up after finding a big mouse nest under the hood right by the exhaust manifold. Not sure why I decided to look under the hood before getting to work, but it sure paid off that day!
 
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