Green Tractor Talk banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would value your opinions on what tractor would give me the most bang for my buck if I wanted to upgrade from 1025r. I am close to purchasing the 1025r and am now having second thoughts on whether or not it will handle all that I plan to do with it (clearing 4 acres of woods, moving stone, moving dirt, etc). I also know that sometimes when you upgrade a step or two you really aren’t getting all that much more for your money.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,631 Posts
The 1025R does have it's limitations but what I like about mine is the size. However I have another 35 H.P. tractor for heavier work. If you don't need the subcompact you might look at a regular compact model say in the 35 h.p. range and you'll have plenty for your needs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
All three of the items you mention require lift capacity. Clearing 4 acres sounds like heavy grapple work. Unsure what your budget is, but if a 2038R was doable that would be something to consider. On the other hand, the 1025R can do all those things just fine, but you may wish you had a little more tractor at times. I have a 2025R and if I could do it all over again I would get a 2038R...so I'm probably biased in that direction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,485 Posts
I think any 2 series will give you cat 1 three point ability versus the 1 series limited cat 1. The limited three point lift is the most frustrating thing to me about my 1025R..

A 2025R is heavier, more stable, and more comfortable.

Both have the same 25 horsepower diesel engine, but the 2025R runs hydraulics at greater pressure, so more lifting capacity of the FEL and the 3 point.

The 1025R does a better job mowing and is more agile, but you did not list mowing as one of your planned uses, so spend more money and go with the 2025R, or really and of the 2 series tractors. That will probably be my next move, having lived with the 1025R's limitations for 1000 hours and 5 years.

I get to drive the 2025R that lives next door from time to time, and when I go back to my 1025R it feels like a Tonka toy for a while.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
I think any 2 series will give you cat 1 three point ability versus the 1 series limited cat 1. The limited three point lift is the most frustrating thing to me about my 1025R..

A 2025R is heavier, more stable, and more comfortable.

Both have the same 25 horsepower diesel engine, but the 2025R runs hydraulics at greater pressure, so more lifting capacity of the FEL and the 3 point.

The 1025R does a better job mowing and is more agile, but you did not list mowing as one of your planned uses, so spend more money and go with the 2025R, or really and of the 2 series tractors. That will probably be my next move, having lived with the 1025R's limitations for 1000 hours and 5 years.

I get to drive the 2025R that lives next door from time to time, and when I go back to my 1025R it feels like a Tonka toy for a while.
As someone that has a newer 2025r I’m going to guess your neighbors isnt a gen 2 because I don’t believe with same 120r loader there is much if any lift improvement over 1025r just bigger frame and tires. I just ordered a new 3039r tlb for this reason. Go 2032r or bigger that has 220r loader to see improvement in lift. Gen 1 had better lift than the new gen 2 FYI.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
667 Posts
If you think the 1025r is too small you will probably feel the same way about the 2025r. The 2025r is a good machine, I’m not knocking it, but it’s not a massive upgrade over the 1025r.

if you’re going to upgrade,the next real step up is the 2032r or 2038r. That has much more power, lift (loader and 3ph), ground clearance, etc....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,485 Posts
As someone that has a newer 2025r I’m going to guess your neighbors isnt a gen 2 because I don’t believe with same 120r loader there is much if any lift improvement over 1025r just bigger frame and tires. I just ordered a new 3039r tlb for this reason. Go 2032r or bigger that has 220r loader to see improvement in lift. Gen 1 had better lift than the new gen 2 FYI.
Ii's the three point hitch difference that is most important to me. The FEL loader lift height of the 1025R is fine for my purposes. I just wish I could lift more pounds of load on and off my trailer. I was trying to unload trees with root balls off the trailer and the 1025R would not budge them, but the 2025R I borrowed picked them right up. The 1025R FEL moves dirt and manure around my place just fine since I can adjust that load by siimply moving a little less volume at one time. The vertical lift there has no real relevance for me, as long as I can get the load a few inches off the ground to move it, and just high enough when I get where I'm going to dump it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,832 Posts
I have a 1025 and 4 acres. I have moved hundreds ofyards of dirt from theback of the house to the front. Not to mention moving cut down trees. I have dug up stumps and lots of rocks. I wish it was bigger at times but i know its limits. I also mow and plow snow. If I was buying one new I would probably stick with the 1025. For what i do its enough. I don't know what your plans are after clearing everthing? I like that its small enough to get in to tight places. I dont use the 3 pt much. The bh stays on.

I also have the advantage of having big excavators brought in when its to much.

I would go with the 2032 or 38 because the 2025 isnt all that much different than a 1025. If thats what your gut is telling you...

Good luck!
WB 🚜🇺🇲
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,971 Posts
I think any 2 series will give you cat 1 three point ability versus the 1 series limited cat 1. The limited three point lift is the most frustrating thing to me about my 1025R..
Why.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,355 Posts
Unless you want to run high demand pto attachments I would be looking at a 3025.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JimR and ejb69

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,096 Posts
I have 10+ acres of woods and steeeeep hills. about 30 degrees at the worst.
I've had my 1025 all over the woods. In the creek. I've slid sideways down some of my hills without tipping (so far).

A bigger machine would not fit where I take mine. Also a bigger machine might be more likely to tip over. In my case, A 2025 would be too weak because my 1025 can't even pull my hills in high gear. It's taller and the same width so it would be more likely to flip over. So my choices where between 1 and Large 2 or 3 series. Because the others are too large they couldn't be an option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,741 Posts
I think the 3025 is best bang for the buck. The only down side I see with it is the lack of mid pto. Which means no mmm or front snowblower. Also no quick attach loader.

The only reason I don’t have one is my 1026 is mostly used for mowing , very seldom have the loader on my tractor For more than a few hours.
 
  • Like
Reactions: rydplrs

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,281 Posts
Unless you want to run high demand pto attachments I would be looking at a 3025.
Agreed! People here tend to have a fascination with the "R" models but you can slide into a 3025E for less than a 2032R/2038R.

I'd look at the functional differences between the R, E and D models and see if you actually need any of the things the R models provide (i.e. mid-PTO, Cruise Control, etc...).
 
  • Like
Reactions: rydplrs

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,485 Posts
I live in the coastal plain area of South Carolina. The soil is nice and sandy down to about 3 feet, where you hit a clay layer. Rocks are rare, and the farm is on level ground. I want a tractor to be able to do four main things for me.

(1) Mow horse pastures. I do not want to buy a ZTR. I have a MMM and a rotary cutter. I have enough wheeled vehicles to maintain without adding another.
(2) Move dirt from a dump truck pile at the street to spread over uneven spots. I just finished triaxle truck load number 15.
(3) Move manure every day from the barn to composting bins, and turn over the piles occasionally.
(4) Dig post holes.

The 1-series does jobs (1) and (2) and (3) to my satisfaction. For job (4) I would like to be able to run a longer auger. The 25 hp 1- series digs just fine in my soil, but the auger length is limited by the lift height of the 1-series three point. TTWT has a nice youtube video about this situation. Having to dig out the bottom and deepen every augered post hole with manual posthole diggers is too much for me. I want to be able to auger a full depth hole, drop in a 6 inch diameter pressure treated post, and move on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
292 Posts
I live in the coastal plain area of South Carolina. The soil is nice and sandy down to about 3 feet, where you hit a clay layer. Rocks are rare, and the farm is on level ground. I want a tractor to be able to do four main things for me.

(1) Mow horse pastures. I do not want to buy a ZTR. I have a MMM and a rotary cutter. I have enough wheeled vehicles to maintain without adding another.
(2) Move dirt from a dump truck pile at the street to spread over uneven spots. I just finished triaxle truck load number 15.
(3) Move manure every day from the barn to composting bins, and turn over the piles occasionally.
(4) Dig post holes.

The 1-series does jobs (1) and (2) and (3) to my satisfaction. For job (4) I would like to be able to run a longer auger. The 25 hp 1- series digs just fine in my soil, but the auger length is limited by the lift height of the 1-series three point. TTWT has a nice youtube video about this situation. Having to dig out the bottom and deepen every augered post hole with manual posthole diggers is too much for me. I want to be able to auger a full depth hole, drop in a 6 inch diameter pressure treated post, and move on.
You know I've never given it a thought. I've heard people many times say they don't know why it's limited because they haven't found an attachment that won't attach to it. Post holes is definitely a downside. Although I saw someone who mounts a post hole digger on their fel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,355 Posts
Nobody makes extensions? For the tow behind one man manual diggers they have the bit, and when you bury that you add a 1’ extension, then drag it out of the hole and remove it because it’s to long to start the next. This is to go to 48”, below our frost line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,167 Posts
I live in the coastal plain area of South Carolina. The soil is nice and sandy down to about 3 feet, where you hit a clay layer. Rocks are rare, and the farm is on level ground. I want a tractor to be able to do four main things for me.

(1) Mow horse pastures. I do not want to buy a ZTR. I have a MMM and a rotary cutter. I have enough wheeled vehicles to maintain without adding another.
(2) Move dirt from a dump truck pile at the street to spread over uneven spots. I just finished triaxle truck load number 15.
(3) Move manure every day from the barn to composting bins, and turn over the piles occasionally.
(4) Dig post holes.

The 1-series does jobs (1) and (2) and (3) to my satisfaction. For job (4) I would like to be able to run a longer auger. The 25 hp 1- series digs just fine in my soil, but the auger length is limited by the lift height of the 1-series three point. TTWT has a nice youtube video about this situation. Having to dig out the bottom and deepen every augered post hole with manual posthole diggers is too much for me. I want to be able to auger a full depth hole, drop in a 6 inch diameter pressure treated post, and move on.
I think you would be more pleased with a 2032r/2038r for all 4 of your tasks.

1025r will ride pretty rough for mowing pasture...and a 4’ brush mower is slow.

You will appreciate the higher lift height of the 2R.

Tim
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top