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Discussion Starter #1
Real world experience, how much weight can you lift and move safely in your bucket with ZERO rear ballast.

Not what it will pick up 3", not what it will pick up @ such and such angle / distance, time of year, humidity level, temperature, after lunch or after supper.

What will it lift and move with no rear ballast?

Thank you
 

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An empty bucket or light attachment. :good2:

Anything more than that and you risk tipping the tractor.
 

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Real world experience, how much weight can you lift and move safely in your bucket with ZERO rear ballast.

Not what it will pick up 3", not what it will pick up @ such and such angle / distance, time of year, humidity level, temperature, after lunch or after supper.

What will it lift and move with no rear ballast?

Thank you
It's impossible to give a specific answer as there are too many variables. Operator weight is one of them.

It sounds like you already have something in mind that you want to try. Can you share the details?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It sounds like you already have something in mind that you want to try. Can you share the details?
no sir I don't.
Buddy of mine asked me what will it lift. I said I thought about 600 lbs with some weight on the rear. I didn't have any other answer.

My grandfather farmed his entire life and I grew up around OLD tractors and machinery. I kinda expected this 1025 to be able to carry a light bucket load of dirt with no problem. I think now I need a bigger tractor. This thing ain't much more than overgrown lawn mower to me.

The rear ballast requirements listed in the loader manual are crazy to me. It's going to get mighty expensive to lift that ~600 lbs.

However, a bigger tractor will even get more expensive.
 

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you risk tipping the tractor every time you get on it :danger:
This is very true, especially if you don’t outfit the tractor with the REQUIRED ballast.

It's impossible to give a specific answer as there are too many variables. Operator weight is one of them.
^^^^ This nailed it. ^^^^
 

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The one series is a very capable workhorse once you’ve ballasted it correctly for the task at hand. I had zero problems lifting a heaping bucket of rip-rap many times over. You get more than just the needed stability with ballast, you get a lot more traction.

You simply can’t compare a large heavy tractor to a SCUT that’s incredibly lighter and smaller. But not ballasting it won’t do much prior to the task at hand and will seriously handicap your machine and make it considerably more dangerous to operate. Your machine is A LOT more capable than you think it is.
 

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no sir I don't.
Buddy of mine asked me what will it lift. I said I thought about 600 lbs with some weight on the rear. I didn't have any other answer.
That's a reasonable assessment of the power of the loader hydraulics.

My grandfather farmed his entire life and I grew up around OLD tractors and machinery. I kinda expected this 1025 to be able to carry a light bucket load of dirt with no problem. I think now I need a bigger tractor. This thing ain't much more than overgrown lawn mower to me.
Dirt is heavy. A loader bucket of dirt is almost the same weight as crushed stones. Keep in mind that the tractors of the past were mostly made of steel and iron. Today's smaller tractors are made of aluminum and plastic. So while they have powerful transmissions and hydraulics, they need a bit of counterweight to make them safe. While some like to refer to it as an over sized garden tractor, the 1-series tractor is a very capable platform when configured correctly. If you want to see just what a 1025R can do, check out Tractor Tim with Tim on YouTube. I would also encourage you to review the on-line manuals for larger tractors like the 2-series and 3-series. You will find they too require a significant counterweight on the 3PH to safely use the loader.

The rear ballast requirements listed in the loader manual are crazy to me. It's going to get mighty expensive to lift that ~600 lbs.
Yes, they seemed crazy to me also when I first got my tractor. But the folks at JD are no dummies. They pretty much know what it takes to make the tractor safe. I would look around for the cheapest ballast box you can find and fill it with about $50 worth of concrete bricks from Home Depot. That should get you near the required weight.

However, a bigger tractor will even get more expensive.
And... unless you go up to a 5-series or 6-series, you will still need a big counterweight. In fact, 3 and 4-series need twice the weight of your 1025R.

Be safe and happy tractoring.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ok, maybe to be more specific on why I even bought this machine.
To lift and move anything that I can't with my hands or accomplish with a hand truck.
To use a box blade and rake to clean up a couple acres I just had clear cut of 120' pines along with some hard woods.
To mow......eventually.

I bought an Omni Hitch 3 point weight rack with receiver hitch's parallel and vertical.
This will only hold 8 suitcase weights. That's 336 lbs of ballast.
I got my eyes on a Land Pride 48 or 54" Box Blade --- ~316 - 325 lbs.

The above ballast is no where near what manual calls for. Wheel weights, filled tire, 600 lbs.
cheese and rice man !!

I was trying to avoid buying a dedicated BOX for ballast. But it looks like that is what it will take.

Once I get my pallet forks and the rear hitch loaded up, I'll pick up some things in my shop and see how that 336 lbs feels to me.

I ain't an idiot, and I'm well versed with operating equipment and lifting heavy loads.
39 yrs with "the light company" and operated a 3 stage boom truck for 20 yrs. Picking up , installing / removing 138/69kv transformer radiators in close proximity to 138kv energized lines and bus.

But that don't make me no expert on 25hp tractors, and I don't claim to be an expert at anything.

:usa
 

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Discussion Starter #12
In fact, 3 and 4-series need twice the weight of your 1025R.

Be safe and happy tractoring.
Thank you, I will start studying that for sure, as I've been looking for decent second hand 4 series. 4105 is one I've been eyeing, as it was prior to the DPF.
 

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20? gallon drum filled with concrete and bars placed inside to connect to the 3 point. (The drum has long ago rotted away I'd guess. My buddy gave this to me.) I'd estimate it to weigh around 500 lbs? I'd like to next try a 35 gallon drum and put PVC thru it so I can put removable drawbars inside then remove them to use it horizontally as a lawn roller.


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My 1023E will pretty easily lift a heaping bucket full of dirt without ballast, but it does get squirrely carrying it. Adding a ballast box full of pea rock does makes sauntering across the yard safer and less anxiety-provoking. Hooking up the ballast box is a simple process, I don't see it as an issue relative to my needs or expectations for my overgrown lawn tractor.
 

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Ok, maybe to be more specific on why I even bought this machine.
To lift and move anything that I can't with my hands or accomplish with a hand truck.
To use a box blade and rake to clean up a couple acres I just had clear cut of 120' pines along with some hard woods.
To mow......eventually.

I bought an Omni Hitch 3 point weight rack with receiver hitch's parallel and vertical.
This will only hold 8 suitcase weights. That's 336 lbs of ballast.
I got my eyes on a Land Pride 48 or 54" Box Blade --- ~316 - 325 lbs.

The above ballast is no where near what manual calls for. Wheel weights, filled tire, 600 lbs.
cheese and rice man !!

I was trying to avoid buying a dedicated BOX for ballast. But it looks like that is what it will take.

Once I get my pallet forks and the rear hitch loaded up, I'll pick up some things in my shop and see how that 336 lbs feels to me.

I ain't an idiot, and I'm well versed with operating equipment and lifting heavy loads.
39 yrs with "the light company" and operated a 3 stage boom truck for 20 yrs. Picking up , installing / removing 138/69kv transformer radiators in close proximity to 138kv energized lines and bus.

But that don't make me no expert on 25hp tractors, and I don't claim to be an expert at anything.

I have a 385lb box blade for the 1025r. I put 4 42lb suitcase weights hanging off it. Also have a quick hitch which pushes the weight even further back. Plenty of ballast. I also have filled tires, rear wheel spacers and wheel weights. All and all though with a box blade and 8 suitcase weights you’ll have more than you need.
 

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Ballast does not make it capable of lifting more or less. The lift capacity is what it is, regardless of what you have or don't have for ballast. A 600lb bucket load of stone will lift just as fast and just as high with no ballast as it will with buick strapped to the 3 point.

Ballast is what enables that heavy front end loader work to be done safely and without damage to the front axles. Ballast takes a tremendous load off the front axle. And it moves the CG back so the machine isn't tipping forward on the front axle. The front axle pivots side to side. Once the machine starts to tip even slightly forward, the pivoting front axle will allow the machine to tip over to the side very very easily.

If you bought the machine intending to do loader with as-is without adding rear ballast, then you made an incorrect decision. Ballast is required for safe operation and to not destroy the front axle. There are many many options for ballast costing a few hundred dollars, or even free if you're creative. Rationalizing some way out of using ballast is rationalizing getting yourself hurt badly.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Ballast does not make it capable of lifting more or less. The lift capacity is what it is, regardless of what you have or don't have for ballast. A 600lb bucket load of stone will lift just as fast and just as high with no ballast as it will with buick strapped to the 3 point.

Ballast is what enables that heavy front end loader work to be done safely and without damage to the front axles. Ballast takes a tremendous load off the front axle. And it moves the CG back so the machine isn't tipping forward on the front axle. The front axle pivots side to side. Once the machine starts to tip even slightly forward, the pivoting front axle will allow the machine to tip over to the side very very easily.
Thanks. Best explanation yet. Hydraulics is what determines lift. I wasn’t going to go there because my question was turning in to folks finger shaking and scolding me about what not to do or try to do.

I never said I was going to fill the bucket and go bouncing across the pasture.
I simply wanted to know what it would lift and carry safely. If it’s NOTHING then it’s nothing, if it’s a cup of coffee then it’s a cup of coffee.

The continuing discussion about “required” ballast, was just that, a discussion.
 

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My comments from another thread on what I do for ballast. I do not have the manual's stated full amount of ballast either. But I'm happy and comfortable with what I do have.

Eight 42lb suitcase weights on a heavy hitch on a quick hitch, which is 336 + 55 + 61 = 450lbs. This is very good ballast and I'm happy with it. It suites my needs for most everything I do. But I can feel that another 200ish pounds would be helpful with really heavy loader work. If I could do it over again, I would have bought the offset bracket and probably used (4) 72s and (4) 42s. The heavy hitch makes the weight very low profile and easy to maneuver. I have the cart for the heavy hitch to make it super easy to use. I think if I didn't have the cart, laziness would win quite often and I wouldn't use the weights when I should.


Alternate weight is a the box blade on the quick hitch (395 + 61 = 456lbs). I believe this may functionally be "more" ballast since the weight is further back compared to the heavy hitch. You get more leverage out of that so what is basically the same weight is more effective. The downside of this, is the box blade is a massive honking hunk of steel sticking way out back far and wide. It makes maneuvering much more complicated in tight spaces. And if you're not paying attention, it will destroy anything you swing it into.


When I'm using the custom loader mounted snow plow, I will put 5 of the suitcase weights up on the front bumper to help with steering authority. I also do this if I'm using the box blade without the loader attached, which can make the front end a bit loose.
 

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I've had a sub compact with fel for over 12 yrs from a 2210 to now 1025r. Always had a ballast box, and 90-95% of the time when fel is on the ballast box is on.
The other year had 6" limb about 15' long that needed cut off the tree and then cut up and taken over to my BIL.

Never thought a thing about , bucket is 3' off the ground and me DA starts to climb into the bucket to cut the limb off. Tractor is setting across the back yard (good slop) I put one leg in the bucket and I feel the rear wheel come off the ground. :banghead:

So with 225-235# of sh_ _ , on a slope will cause the tractor to tip..

Setting on level ground and you just want to lift it up in the air, guessing 5-600 # maybe more. If you want to move the tractor and turn the wheels , different story, plus more damage to the front axle ..

Be safe use ballast on the rear of the tractor,, even gravel, large stones , metal plates, concrete. sand.
 
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