Green Tractor Talk banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm giving the 47" loader a workout, slinging lengths of oak log from the toothbar to get them off my driveway where the tree crew left them. Don't know weights, but some must be at least 800 lbs. (The biggest ones I can only move by raising the loader to tension the lift chain, then curling the bucket to get a few inches of ground clearance.)

Front tires get very low, so I have two concerns:

- Front axle. I have the ballast box tightly packed with bricks, with another 20# or so of spare chain sitting on top. Driving very slowly on smooth paving. Does that seem safe?

- Tires/rims. Sure hate to wreck one. So - what's the max safe pressure for R4s? Any reason not to keep them pumped to the safe limit all the time for normal use?

Thanks for your advice.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
22,268 Posts
The tires are supposed to be 22psi in the front, 20psi in the rear. I wouldn't run any higher as this was what JD engineered it as. I've run the loader to full capacity and the front tires do look low when you get a good load in the bucket. I didn't have any problems. Just my .000002 cents...

You said you had a fully loaded ballast box. Do you know what it weighs? If the rearend of the tractor didn't feel light, I'd say you're pretty close to where you should be. Taking it slow certainly doesn't hurt. If you can help it, try keeping your load close to the ground. It's a lot more stable this way. :good2:


Sent from my phone using Tapatalk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
554 Posts
I run my fronts a little over max rating about 28lbs, do so at your own risk, but I feel it is easier on the side walls. The only caution I can give to you is be careful turning on the pavement with a full loader bucket and the tractor in 4 wheel drive, to prevent rolling the front tire off the rim.:unknown:
Just my .02, good luck.:drinks:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You said you had a fully loaded ballast box. Do you know what it weighs? If the rearend of the tractor didn't feel light, I'd say you're pretty close to where you should be. Taking it slow certainly doesn't hurt. If you can help it, try keeping your load close to the ground. It's a lot more stable this way.
Don't know exact BB weight, but I'm guessing that it's within 5% of a full load of concrete: the bricks I used are nearly identical in size, and (in the right arrangement) fit in almost perfectly.

I usually keep the load within a few inches of the ground, except when hoisting it to clear obstacles. A lot less sway, and more comfortable when I can drop it to the ground quickly. Loader cylinders (or relief valve setting) won't deliver enough lift power to tip the tractor forward, though levering up a log with the side of the bucket has tipped this lightweight machine onto one corner - a little scary. Now I just use bucket curl against the graond to hoist logs a couple of inches, slide the sling chain underneath, drop the log, and lift again with the chain centered on two opposite bucket teeth.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top