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I have a 1988 1050 with a Model 75 loader bucket. I have bolt on forks that I use quite frequently. In my infinite wisdom :banghead:, I decided to try to lift some large rock with the forks, which as you know, caused the lower edge of the bucket to bend downward :cry:.

To those who have either seen/experienced/read about this...

What are my options with this outside of replacing the bucket?

1) Is there a way to straighten this?
2) Is cutting/welding a possibility?

Thanks,
Eric
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I think a welding shop could try to straighten it or cut out the bottom of the bucket and replace it along with reinforcing it. Put the bucket in the back of your truck and take it for a ride. They will able to quickly tell you what your options are.
 

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I think a welding shop could try to straighten it or cut out the bottom of the bucket and replace it along with reinforcing it. Put the bucket in the back of your truck and take it for a ride. They will able to quickly tell you what your options are.
I was thinking of that but it might be costly with the amount of bucket that needs to be cut out and welded. I was just putting out the word here that maybe going with a used bucket might be cheaper or if there was a DIY way of straightening it? :laugh:
 

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Well as someone who occasionally bends things......

Use the same thing that bent it in the first place.

Put some weight in the bucket with the forks on and push down.

Might not get it flat but closer.

Maybe a bolt-on or weld on cutting edge and lots of C clamps would help get the rest out.
 

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Need a torch to heat it up, then push down on the rock. Heating up the steel will help straighten it, but weaken it so reinforcing it with a cutting edge is what I’d do. And of course don’t bolt on a fork to the middle of your bucket and use it as a pry bar again.


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Thanks for the tips! I'll see what I can do...a friend of mine used to weld gas pipelines and we were planning to make it a winter project and cut and weld, but I'd like to try to straighten it instead prior to the winter. Unfortunately, I don't have a torch or new edge to use.
 

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Lay a beam (or strong pipe) across the top of the bucket.
Wrap two chains around the bucket, right at the center,,
(BIG chains,, at least 3/8", anything smaller is at risk of breaking)

Use two chain binders, and pull the chain,, the center will bend right back up.

You can not do it with one chain,, it might even take three chains and binders,,

A 3/8" binder with a pipe extension on the handle will bend that bucket like it was made out of butter. :good2:
 

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Take the bucket off, turn it upside down on a hard surface, and with a couple of boards under it to adsorb the shock, wack on the high spot with a mall …
You'll be surprised how much of the bow you can remove ... :thumbup1gif:
 

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Lay a beam (or strong pipe) across the top of the bucket.
Wrap two chains around the bucket, right at the center,,
(BIG chains,, at least 3/8", anything smaller is at risk of breaking)

Use two chain binders, and pull the chain,, the center will bend right back up.

You can not do it with one chain,, it might even take three chains and binders,,

A 3/8" binder with a pipe extension on the handle will bend that bucket like it was made out of butter. :good2:
Do you have any pictures/drawing for example?
 

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Do you have any pictures/drawing for example?
Put the chain around the bucket, over the bent spot,, JUST like you put a belt around your waist.

You need to support the top of the bucket with something so when the belt(chain) is tightened, the top of the bucket does not bend down.

Now, like a fat guy cinching in his belt to pull in his waist,, tighten the chain, using a binder.

While one chain is tight, cinch up the second chain, just like a second belt around your waist, with a second binder.
The second chain will cause a little slack in the first chain.
While the second chain is holding,, tighten the first some more.
Then, tighten the second one more
Then tighten the first one more

You will soon bend the bucket to where you want it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Put the chain around the bucket, over the bent spot,, JUST like you put a belt around your waist.

You need to support the top of the bucket with something so when the belt(chain) is tightened, the top of the bucket does not bend down.

Now, like a fat guy cinching in his belt to pull in his waist,, tighten the chain, using a binder.

While one chain is tight, cinch up the second chain, just like a second belt around your waist, with a second binder.
The second chain will cause a little slack in the first chain.
While the second chain is holding,, tighten the first some more.
Then, tighten the second one more
Then tighten the first one more

You will soon bend the bucket to where you want it.
Ok...now to get my hands on 3/8" chain and binders. Would Harbor Freight or Tractor Supply?

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Ok...now to get my hands on 3/8" chain and binders. Would Harbor Freight or Tractor Supply?

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Horrible Fright will be less :gizmo: than Tractor Supply and both will be Chinese.

Remember to keep your body away from the binders. They can be a spring loaded a$$ whooping.
 

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Get ratcheting binders, don't get the levered tension binders. Like Cadplans said, lay a piece of rigid pipe across the top, to keep from deforming the top of the bucket.

https://www.harborfreight.com/search?q=chain%20binder

The two on the left, no the one on the right. They'll pull that bow flat.
 

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Some Napa auto parts stores carry pretty good quality chains and binders if your still looking. Otherwise any industrial hardware store should have what you need.


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Put the chain around the bucket, over the bent spot,, JUST like you put a belt around your waist.

You need to support the top of the bucket with something so when the belt(chain) is tightened, the top of the bucket does not bend down.

Now, like a fat guy cinching in his belt to pull in his waist,, tighten the chain, using a binder.
I’ve bent a lot of stuff in my day and before I read any suggestions, I was thinking of something like Cadplans’s. Any gear you have to purchase will most certainly be helpful in other projects including this one in the future.
 

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Keep in mind, now that it has been bent with the bolt on forks, it's likely to bend even easier in the future once you do straighten it, especially if heat is involved in the process. So using the bolt on forks for such things in the future is not suggested.......

Also, as someone else mentioned, I would try to bend the bucket with the forks once again using the same rock if available.

You are going to be surprised what the chains and binders cost and if you are buying chain, it should be gold chain which is Grade 70 or the chain will likely break and that could be very violent and dangerous....Don't be surprised if you spend a few hundred dollars on chain and binders, here is a link to some costs for ideas...measure the bucket circumference so you know how much chain you need to squeeze it back together.

Grade 70 Transport Chain and Binder Chain

Here is a table which explains chain grades. Do NOT BUY CHEAP chain for such projects as the breaking chain could be fatal.......

Here are chain and ratcheting binders to give you an idea of cost. I would stay away from really cheap binders and make sure to get the transport chain grade of 70 for the gold chain as that way if you ever need to transport the tractor or implements and tie them down, the chain meets the legal requirements for chain strength. Plus I would be careful about putting a lot of pressure on any cheap chain.......I have seen too many break and its a very violent process and highly dangerous.........


What Is The Difference Between Grades Of Chain?


Just remember to squeeze the fat man's belt slowly and cautiously as he is likely going to resist and beware of the gas which you might squeeze out....:laugh::lol::yahoo:
 

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Good way to get a hairlip I always say. I was yarding on a really big log today with a choker cable and envisioned that thing slicing my skull in half. Knew a guy who used to work at a tire shop and was inflating a truck tire with those keeper rings on the rim they used back in the 70s and it blew out taking a part of his skull off. Poor bastard spent the rest of his days missing part of his head. High tensioned chains and cables are devastating when they pop.


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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Keep in mind, now that it has been bent with the bolt on forks, it's likely to bend even easier in the future once you do straighten it, especially if heat is involved in the process. So using the bolt on forks for such things in the future is not suggested.......

Also, as someone else mentioned, I would try to bend the bucket with the forks once again using the same rock if available.

You are going to be surprised what the chains and binders cost and if you are buying chain, it should be gold chain which is Grade 70 or the chain will likely break and that could be very violent and dangerous....Don't be surprised if you spend a few hundred dollars on chain and binders, here is a link to some costs for ideas...measure the bucket circumference so you know how much chain you need to squeeze it back together.

Grade 70 Transport Chain and Binder Chain

Here is a table which explains chain grades. Do NOT BUY CHEAP chain for such projects as the breaking chain could be fatal.......

Here are chain and ratcheting binders to give you an idea of cost. I would stay away from really cheap binders and make sure to get the transport chain grade of 70 for the gold chain as that way if you ever need to transport the tractor or implements and tie them down, the chain meets the legal requirements for chain strength. Plus I would be careful about putting a lot of pressure on any cheap chain.......I have seen too many break and its a very violent process and highly dangerous.........


What Is The Difference Between Grades Of Chain?


Just remember to squeeze the fat man's belt slowly and cautiously as he is likely going to resist and beware of the gas which you might squeeze out....:laugh::lol::yahoo:
I did a quick look at the HF prices for the higher-end binders and if I am right....it's looking like ~$150 for (3) binders alone [that is, if I need (3)]. Add the cost of the chain, and now I'm upping the cost to over $300+ just for materials alone just to straighten the bucket once (I have no other use for the chains, binders since I already have lower grade chains around the house) so now I have some very expensive binding equipment.

If that's the case...cutting and welding seems to be the safer and cheaper route (or finding someone who has an old 750/950/1050 or compatible model that has a model 75 loader bucket for sale).

I am not sure about trying to bend the bucket back with the forks attached since the lifting force on the loader may not be enough to do it (and the fact that I might bust a hose in the process). It definitely was a thought though! [Note: there are (2) long metal straps welded along the bucket for strength which will make it that much harder to bend it back into place :(]
 
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