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I started wearing glasses when I was 4 years old, with my eyes continually getting worse till the point I had to use real glass lenses to keep from having thick glasses. So after 27 years of wearing glasses I had lasik surgery. 90% of my severe astigmatism was taken care of and for 11 years I saw 20-15.

So anyway, went to the eye Dr and need glasses. He is recommending a multifocal progressive lens. From what I have read these take practice to get accustomed too.

Anyone here wear them? What is your experience? Better / worse than bifocals?
 

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As my focus ability got worse I got "tri-focals" after years of bi-focals. Everybody told me you'll kill yourself with those trifocals running into stuff and stepping over rocks, etc. I got used to them riding home in the car from the glasses place - no problem. Don't psych yourself out, if you're wearing bi's I'll bet you can get used to them quickly.

My next pair of glasses (soon!) will be the progressives!!! I guess I get used to glasses easier than some. I just won't buy the "progressively self changing sunglasses" again, P-I-A!

Edit: BTW, half the problems with bi or trifocal glasses is the person doing the fitting. All multifocal glasses have to sit on your face where the Rx is designed. Some of the glasses "box stores" I've used (I won't mention Pearl or Lenscrafters) they don't get the positions right. I've learned over the years how to "tune" the fit and comfort of new and "badly bent":laugh: old glasses.
 

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I wear progressive lens and have for 10 years or more. They do take some getting use to.
Every time I get a new set of glasses it seems I have to go back at least twice to get them fitted correctly, if not get then remade.
Note: I don't use Box stores for my glasses, wish I could.
 

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Yes they take a little getting used to, but it is well worth it. Once you adapt to them they are great. Going down steps was the worst part for me till I got used to them. I did have to have a specific clip on lens made to shoot handguns with. That works great as it forces you to focus on the front site, since that is the distance it is made for.

Try it, I'm sure you will like it once you adjust.

Rich
 

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Just a thought and a question... Since you had such good results (20-15) from the correction, have you looked into getting a "touch up" procedure done?

I know there are lots of considerations they have to take into account before doing the procedure or any subsequent corrections, but as a LASIK patient and having a brother who is and has had a "touch up" himself, they're not that uncommon and considering the success of your first time, a correction should be on the table at least.
 

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Yes they take a little getting used to, but it is well worth it. Once you adapt to them they are great. Going down steps was the worst part for me till I got used to them. I did have to have a specific clip on lens made to shoot handguns with. That works great as it forces you to focus on the front site, since that is the distance it is made for.

Try it, I'm sure you will like it once you adjust.

Rich
Steps are an issue here as well. I've come to the point of not looking down for the next step.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Just a thought and a question... Since you had such good results (20-15) from the correction, have you looked into getting a "touch up" procedure done?

I know there are lots of considerations they have to take into account before doing the procedure or any subsequent corrections, but as a LASIK patient and having a brother who is and has had a "touch up" himself, they're not that uncommon and considering the success of your first time, a correction should be on the table at least.
I am told what I am experiencing is just from age and sitting in front of a computer too much, that there is no correction. With that said, even if a correction could be done I don't know that I would make the attempt. My eyes were very bad and they were able to correct well beyond what the Dr expected, I guess I just don't want to push my luck.
 

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I am told what I am experiencing is just from age and sitting in front of a computer too much, that there is no correction. With that said, even if a correction could be done I don't know that I would make the attempt. My eyes were very bad and they were able to correct well beyond what the Dr expected, I guess I just don't want to push my luck.
I think "not pushing your luck" is smart, it's your eyes we are talking about after all. My eyes are quite bad and I have had glasses since 2nd grade and am 39 now. I have gone to the same optometrist since junior high. I have always contemplated having Lasik done, but the doc doesn't recommend it, so I haven't. I don't think it's "business insurance" on the doc's part. More of a concern for the long term safety of the eyes, way down the road. Don't want one of those "you remember that procedure you had 35 years ago" type of thing. As long as I can wear contacts and they aren't visibly sticking out of my eyes:laugh:, I am ok.:thumbup1gif: Ditto, what Gizmo says about it being a pain to buy glasses when you have "coke bottle lenses"...UGH!
 

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ColonyPark, I had to go back to wearing glasses. After many, many years of wearing contacts my eyes got bad enough that with my contacts in I couldn't read a thing without using magnifying eye glasses also. I sure miss the contact days.
 

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My eyes were perfect until I started to law school at age 38. Doctor said it was my age; that your eyes change over the years and I needed bifocals. I eventually changed to the progressives, and I really like them...and as someone else said, they take a bit of getting used to. I have only got one good fitting in all they years; I still have to use reading glasses for the computer.
 

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I am not a fan of progressives. The second set of bifocals I had were progressives. I found the angle of view (side-to-side) too narrow and I had to turn my head to see things clearly that I could previously see with the bifocals without moving my head. An example is the car radio. I kept the progressives for a year and then went back to lined bifocals.


Then a few years later came lined trifocals. Not much different than the bifocals. One year, the cute girl at the vision shop convinced me that progressive trifocal lenses had improved and that they would look real good on me. So, of course, I bought them. I kept them a month, as again, the angle of view was way too narrow compared to the unflattering trifocals.


Maybe they have made advances in the viewing angle of progressives and they are better than in the past. Even if so, I'll not try them again. I've got lines on my glasses and I don't mind them a bit. They compliment the lines on my face and the furrows in my brow.
 

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I'm curious about the "progressive" part. I have what I call "no-line bifocals" - does that mean they are progressive or not?

I don't want to add to the conversation if I don't have experience with what the OP is talking about......
 

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I don't want to add to the conversation if I don't have experience with what the OP is talking about......
Hey man, its OK, I do it all the time... :munch:






See ^^ :hide2:

Ive worn glasses since I was 6, and have NO plans of looking into Lasik or contacts.. Glasses have saved my eyes sooo many times.. Sucks someone that had the procedure has to have glasses again.. :banghead:
 

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I've had progressives for a long time and have had no trouble except when I sat on them. No problems for me at lnscrfters. Friend had Lasik about 15 yrs ago and now has gone to the drugstore and bought over the counter reading glasses (cheap) for his computer and close reading use.
 

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I'm curious about the "progressive" part. I have what I call "no-line bifocals" - does that mean they are progressive or not?

I don't want to add to the conversation if I don't have experience with what the OP is talking about......

Progressives are just that...progressive in their magnification as your move your head up or down. I have stayed away from them as I felt that I just did not want to look like I had a bobble head. In order to see something clearly, you need to move your head up or down until the vision clears. I wore bifocals with the line for many years until I had cataract surgery last year as I also felt that the no-line bifocals could be a problem in seeing clearly at that point. At least, with the lines, I knew that I would need to move my head a little. It all comes down to what works best for you. I was near sighted for 50 years and now, after surgery, I am far sighted. It is taking some getting used to. I now have cheap "cheaters" in every room of the house, in every vehicle and in every coat pocket so I can see up close. I even have safety glasses with bifocal lenses for close up use. Sorry to say that my vision is already fading, so I can seem me having to again wear glasses full time again in the not to distant future.

Dave
 

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When I finally got glasses, I asked about Lasik surgery. They said my vision issues were not Lasik correctable, so not an option for me. I knew I would lose/break glasses, so I did not want them. I have lost/broken many pairs :mad::mad:
As for progressive lens, when the time came I did get them. They told me watch out on stairs. Never an issue for me, I am not one to watch my feet on stairs. But if the builder set one step off more than 1/4" either way I find it real fast :banghead:
 

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Progressives are just that...progressive in their magnification as your move your head up or down. I have stayed away from them as I felt that I just did not want to look like I had a bobble head. In order to see something clearly, you need to move your head up or down until the vision clears. I wore bifocals with the line for many years until I had cataract surgery last year as I also felt that the no-line bifocals could be a problem in seeing clearly at that point. At least, with the lines, I knew that I would need to move my head a little. It all comes down to what works best for you. I was near sighted for 50 years and now, after surgery, I am far sighted. It is taking some getting used to. I now have cheap "cheaters" in every room of the house, in every vehicle and in every coat pocket so I can see up close. I even have safety glasses with bifocal lenses for close up use. Sorry to say that my vision is already fading, so I can seem me having to again wear glasses full time again in the not to distant future.

Dave
I can see your point about the regular line bifocals and the no-line. I never needed glasses until around age 42 when I started having difficulty reading. I bought a couple pair of the $1 reading glasses to use at home but I refused to bring them with me to work. Then my eyes got progressively worse but for reading only - long distance sight was fine. Then it got to the point that I couldn't read the gauges on my truck so I went to the eye doctor. I needed just a slight correction for the distance sight plus the bifocals. This was my first pair of real glasses so I opted for the no-line right then. There was an adjustment period for sure - especially on stairs - but after a few days I got used to it. And moving your head to get the bifocals lined up to what you are reading - it just became second nature after a couple weeks to get to the right position instantly. I guess if one was used to the regular line type it would be an adjustment period, but no more than the adjustment period I went through with the no-line I think. It's quite amazing how our brain will adapt to these type of things to become perfectly intuitive.

When I am on the computer I still use the $1 reading glasses so I don't have to tilt my head up to read my monitor.

I do go to the eye doc every year for a check up especially since I have Diabetes also. There are none of those big box type stores around here. She has been great with us in working with us even when we didn't have any vision insurance. Even when we do have insurance she never pushes us for new glasses - if there are no changes to our eyes then that is it. I had to force my wife to get a new pair a couple years ago since hers were really beat up from time in the kitchen (grease spatter etc.) and doing chores outside. And it also doesn't help glasses when our beloved Bentley (200# English Mastiff) wants to play and you get a paw across the face accidentally.......
 

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I think "not pushing your luck" is smart, it's your eyes we are talking about after all. My eyes are quite bad and I have had glasses since 2nd grade and am 39 now. I have gone to the same optometrist since junior high. I have always contemplated having Lasik done, but the doc doesn't recommend it, so I haven't. I don't think it's "business insurance" on the doc's part. More of a concern for the long term safety of the eyes, way down the road. Don't want one of those "you remember that procedure you had 35 years ago" type of thing. As long as I can wear contacts and they aren't visibly sticking out of my eyes:laugh:, I am ok.:thumbup1gif: Ditto, what Gizmo says about it being a pain to buy glasses when you have "coke bottle lenses"...UGH!
I almost didn't want to get into this post, however, this is what happens when you go thru Lasik twice,, sorry for the post but you have to know.. Jeff I'm 62.
View attachment 42315 :flag_of_truce:
 

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Thanks Jeff. A picture is worth a thousand words.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I never needed glasses till I was in my early 40's. When I had to get my second set a few years later I was told I needed bifocals. I went with the no line type. The last pair I had to get I got the trifocals, no lines. I only ever had one problem. When I look down at a piece of wood I'm wanting to cut it looks bent, curved. I even took a square to make sure it was a straight line. It's always done this and I'm OK with it. Other then that I haven't had any problems with them including getting used to them. I don't like lines in my vision. I don't like going from seeing good to magnifying glass all in just a slight move of your eyes. I don't know if you call no line trifocals progressive or not but I wouldn't go with anything then what I now have. I can't tell where the change starts except that seeing gets better as I look farther down as far as reading goes or smaller print. There is no jump from one place on my glasses to another as I look down. It just gets easier to read. As for the bobble head, I just don't care what people think of me having to move my head up to see something better. Seeing is more important. Coke bottles wouldn't bother me if it meant being able to see. But then I'm 62+ and I'm to old and married to care what people think of me. :dunno: :lol: :bigthumb:
 
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