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Concrete pad or crushed stone as a base for the 2 story 12x18 storage building?

Pros, cons, prior experience?

It’s about 100 feet from a large body of freshwater, elevated about four feet above it (no wave action that high up)

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I think it all boils down to the size of your wallet. A concrete base is superior and looks nicer, but is much more expensive than the stone.
 

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2-story? slab. I have enough trouble keeping my 12x16 single story shed from racking due to the ground heaving because of freeze/thaw cycles. One of my projects this summer is to move it, drop holes below the frost line and put in piers to set it back on top of.
 

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Concrete pad or crushed stone as a base for the 2 story 12x18 storage building?

Pros, cons, prior experience?

It’s about 100 feet from a large body of freshwater, elevated about four feet above it (no wave action that high up)

Ready, GO
If you have the money, I would go with concrete. Easier to work and store stuff on. Even if you have stone there is a chance for water/moisture to get in. That is fairly small size to have a pad poured for so it shouldn't be a tremendous expense.
 

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I assume you are talking building a pole building type construction?? If so, your choice of stone or concrete will have no effect on the building structure, so, concrete would obviously be nicer, although, whatever makes you happy will work.

Actually, a concrete floor in any building shouldn't have anything to do with the building structure unless you are simply building on a slab.
 

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If you have the money, I would go with concrete. Easier to work and store stuff on. Even if you have stone there is a chance for water/moisture to get in. That is fairly small size to have a pad poured for so it shouldn't be a tremendous expense.

@4” that’s 2.67 cubic yards

@6” that’s 4 cubic yards

Depending on material price ($100-150/cyd) your only talking $600 max for materials and possibly another few hundred for labor to place it.
 

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@4” that’s 2.67 cubic yards

@6” that’s 4 cubic yards

Depending on material price ($100-150/cyd) your only talking $600 max for materials and possibly another few hundred for labor to place it.
I can't speak for everywhere in the country but in South Central PA, redi-mix concrete delivered is at least $250.00/yard.

Just doing some quick math, it takes 45 - 80 lb. bags of quickcrete for one yard. At $4.00 per bag, that's $180.00 for enough quickcrete bags for one yard. I can't see anywhere in the country where you will get redi-mix concrete for $100.00/yard. Just sayin!!!

I'm definitely not saying, don't concrete the building, but be sure to way the cost accurately in your part of the country. :good2:
 

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5k psi concrete with fiber reinforcement was $125 or so a yard here when delivered. There was a minimum amount and a small fee or two. Overall very reasonable IMHO.
 

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5k psi concrete with fiber reinforcement was $125 or so a yard here when delivered. There was a minimum amount and a small fee or two. Overall very reasonable IMHO.
I new it was expensive to live in PA. Whew, now I know it is!!! :lolol:
 

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I can't speak for everywhere in the country but in South Central PA, redi-mix concrete delivered is at least $250.00/yard.

Just doing some quick math, it takes 45 - 80 lb. bags of quickcrete for one yard. At $4.00 per bag, that's $180.00 for enough quickcrete bags for one yard. I can't see anywhere in the country where you will get redi-mix concrete for $100.00/yard. Just sayin!!!

I'm definitely not saying, don't concrete the building, but be sure to way the cost accurately in your part of the country. :good2:
$250/CYD !?!?!?!!??:banghead:

I can order a yard of limestone mix, 3500 PSI truck delivered Redi-mix concrete with a chemical water reducer and air entrainment for less than $110 from a state certified plant. There are minimum load charges for less than 3-4 yards on a truck, but I don’t ever order less than a full truck. If I let the plant talk me into a cheaper, less technical mix I could get it for a shade UNDER $100 a yard.

Not sure why the suppliers near you get away with highway robbery, but that borders on obscene, $250 a yard... disgraceful.

Your comparison with bags of quickrete, while useful to a point isn’t really valid when comparing commercially deliverable quantities of materials. How much would you pay at a home improvement warehouse for a bag of mulch/play sand/topsoil/landscaping rock/ etc.? You’ll never pay near that cost in an equivalent delivery of bulk materials, or at least you shouldn’t!

With those small quantities of things, your paying for the measuring/weaihing out and the labor to handle the small quantities , the packaging and shipping, etc. with bulk delivered quantities there is next to none of that processing, handling, packaging, waste and labor hence the economy of scale and the typical savings you see.
 

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Concrete around this part of Texas is around $100 a yard with a five yard minimum. Only need two yards - that will be $500 please :lolol:
 

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$250/CYD !?!?!?!!??:banghead:

I can order a yard of limestone mix, 3500 PSI truck delivered Redi-mix concrete with a chemical water reducer and air entrainment for less than $110 from a state certified plant. There are minimum load charges for less than 3-4 yards on a truck, but I don’t ever order less than a full truck. If I let the plant talk me into a cheaper, less technical mix I could get it for a shade UNDER $100 a yard.

Not sure why the suppliers near you get away with highway robbery, but that borders on obscene, $250 a yard... disgraceful.

Your comparison with bags of quickrete, while useful to a point isn’t really valid when comparing commercially deliverable quantities of materials. How much would you pay at a home improvement warehouse for a bag of mulch/play sand/topsoil/landscaping rock/ etc.? You’ll never pay near that cost in an equivalent delivery of bulk materials, or at least you shouldn’t!

With those small quantities of things, your paying for the measuring/weaihing out and the labor to handle the small quantities , the packaging and shipping, etc. with bulk delivered quantities there is next to none of that processing, handling, packaging, waste and labor hence the economy of scale and the typical savings you see.
I hear you but it is true. I got 2 yards of redi-mix last year when I put my flag pole in at $250.00/yd. No joke!!! When I built my garage, 9 yards, full truck load in PA, was at $175.00+ per yard in 2014.
 

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I hear you but it is true. I got 2 yards of redi-mix last year when I put my flag pole in at $250.00/yd. No joke!!! When I built my garage, 9 yards, full truck load in PA, was at $175.00+ per yard in 2014.
An average based on a 2 yard load is likely to badly skew your pricing, since the total likely includes costs you would not incurr with a load above the minimum. It’s likely the actual cost of the materials were more in line with your previous cost but with a hefty fee for minimum order quantities and or delivered charges for a small load that are minimized or waived entirely for standard loads.
 

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An average based on a 2 yard load is likely to badly skew your pricing, since the total likely includes costs you would not incurr with a load above the minimum. It’s likely the actual cost of the materials were more in line with your previous cost but with a hefty fee for minimum order quantities and or delivered charges for a small load that are minimized or waived entirely for standard loads.
Yes for sure. That is in fact the situation the OP is in. To pour the floor for the garage will be about 3 yards which is far from a full load.

I have done allot of concrete pours in the last 4 years, some full loads (about 9 yards) and some minimum loads. Yes, there is definitely a minimum charge for the lessor quantities but that is the situation you find yourself in most of the time when doing small concrete jobs. Unless you are building a house or large garage, you will most likely not need a full truck.

My point is this, when checking on pricing, you better call your supplier. I have not gotten concrete redi-mix for $110.00/yard, full load or not, for a long time in PA. Just sayin!!!
 

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2-story? slab. I have enough trouble keeping my 12x16 single story shed from racking due to the ground heaving because of freeze/thaw cycles. One of my projects this summer is to move it, drop holes below the frost line and put in piers to set it back on top of.
I hear you Jim on the heaving issue. The poster needs to also think about heaving in upstate NY.. Go four feet to the frost line and use 10" sonotubes and remember if you pour a slab, even with piers will heave if not protected on the sides. Another way is to use a good draining gravel under the slab with stone on top of that then slab it and it will not heave. (you hope)
Immagine ready mix for 250 clams a yard!!!!! Talk about being raped! :banghead:
 

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2 stories and only 12' wide? You're gonna want piers just to keep it from blowing over in a Nor'Easter.

Figure out what the minimum concrete load is for an economical rate and then make your slab as thick as it takes to use that stuff up. Or add a pad next to the building for a lean-to.
 

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Yes for sure. That is in fact the situation the OP is in. To pour the floor for the garage will be about 3 yards which is far from a full load.

I have done allot of concrete pours in the last 4 years, some full loads (about 9 yards) and some minimum loads. Yes, there is definitely a minimum charge for the lessor quantities but that is the situation you find yourself in most of the time when doing small concrete jobs. Unless you are building a house or large garage, you will most likely not need a full truck.

My point is this, when checking on pricing, you better call your supplier. I have not gotten concrete redi-mix for $110.00/yard, full load or not, for a long time in PA. Just sayin!!!
$250/yd was definitely for a small load. Up here in the State College area, a full truck from the 'expensive' supplier is $115/yd. The cheaper place is $105/yd. I just had footers poured for my shop/garage and that's what I paid.

However, for 1 yard, that expensive place charges $300/yd

How far 'north' are you from Harrisburg?
 

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I live in central NY. Whether you are building a pole barn building or a slab on grade.. Make sure you have a good gravel base with good drainage, heavy mil vapor barrier and minimum 4" of reinforced concrete. The vapor barrier will stop ground moisture from wicking into your slab. The environment in your barn will be much dryer and it will be easier to perform maintenance on the concrete than if you had a gravel floor. The vapor barrier I used was a membrane with foam insulation and my barn is heated.
 
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