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Discussion Starter #1

In September we bought an 1890 farm house with a nice barn and a few acres. It was quite overgrown and hadn't been lived in (by humans) in many years.


There really is a house in there but over a few decades the bushes had become trees and you couldn't even use the front steps anymore.


So I started by clearing away the overgrowth so the house could be seen. Then I replaced the furnace, water heater, windows and plumbing. We got lucky because the wiring was upgraded in the late 70's (though it still only had a 100amp service)


But the real reason why I bought it was for the barn.
 

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:bigthumb:

Very nice. Bet that will keep you busy for a while.
 

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Chris, (no, the other Chris). :laugh:
Nice place.
I'll bet that house is as solid as the time it was built. They don't build them like that anymore. :bigthumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
We moved in in January. I don't recommend that month in Idaho. Snow is a bugger to move in.


Inside of the barn was rough and covered in bird poop.
Look at the staircase on the left. Why would anybody end the stairs into a wall???


Walls were straightened and concrete poured.


I also took care of that goofy staircase by adding a landing and turning it so it could be used to carry stuff up to the loft above.


Pressure washer did a great job on the bird poo but I think I ended up with an awful lot on me.


Bought the 1025r FILB end of February.
 

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Discussion Starter #5

Lighting and wiring in the barn were less than desirable.


The loft above the barn was in desperate need of upgraded lighting so I took care of that next. Now I have quite a bit of storage space that doesn't use up my shop space.


Graded out the area in front of the barn so my Dear Wife can have "The Park" she wants for grandkids.


Planted a few trees I received from a friend with a tree spade.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)

The North side of the house is where we have decided to build the addition. This is what it looked like on this side before removing the "bushes".


And now after the excavator pulled out those bushes. I had to pull siding so we could establish floor height of the existing building to match to the addition.

Excavation was completed today and I hope to get footings poured by Wednesday.


Well, we had a bit of rain after the hole was dug. This was about 30 mins. of rain.
 

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Wow! Congrats on the property! :good2: Gotta say that I kinda like the barn myself.

How are you finding the old wood framing for working with? I had an old (1870s) place when I lived up in Maine. The old oak 2x4 framing had dried out so much that driving nails was like pounding them into steel. :laugh:

Looks like you've got lots to do. Looking forward to more in-progress pics!
 

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Chris, (no, the other Chris). :laugh:
Nice place.
I'll bet that house is as solid as the time it was built. They don't build them like that anymore. :bigthumb:
Foundation of the original house is stone and mortar. The only wall that showed any appreciable settling was the one supporting the old chimney.
 

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Looking good Chris.

:good2::good2::good2:
 

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Foundation of the original house is stone and mortar. The only wall that showed any appreciable settling was the one supporting the old chimney.
thats interesting. the house at the other farm is an older house (early 1900s or late 1800s) and i'm told that they had to tear out the old chimney because it was causing the wall to settle and lean which was causing the floor to sag without support from the framing.
 

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...Does the barn have it's own electric service or is it fed from the house?...
Barn is fed from the house and that will likely continue to be the case but I plan to upgrade the feed to 90amp to easily handle my equipment.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
thats interesting. the house at the other farm is an older house (early 1900s or late 1800s) and i'm told that they had to tear out the old chimney because it was causing the wall to settle and lean which was causing the floor to sag without support from the framing.
All interior as well as exterior walls of the original house have stone foundations. The old chimney is no longer used so I will remove it when I tackle the reno of the existing house in a year or two.
We will be including a wood stove in the addition.
 

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At least today they laid out and staked for the footing forms. That is better than I expected after Monday night's rain.
They plan to set the footing forms tomorrow.
 

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Beautiful place Chris! :bigthumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Wow! Congrats on the property! :good2: Gotta say that I kinda like the barn myself.

How are you finding the old wood framing for working with? I had an old (1870s) place when I lived up in Maine. The old oak 2x4 framing had dried out so much that driving nails was like pounding them into steel. :laugh:

Looks like you've got lots to do. Looking forward to more in-progress pics!
The house and barn were built almost entirely of old growth red pine. Even the floor joists under the house are beautiful straight grained.
Currently the existing house has 9 foot ceilings but that is because they were dropped over a foot when they ran lighting.
AFTER the addition is finished I plan to redo the living room and will raise the ceiling back up to the original height.
 

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You might find

The house and barn were built almost entirely of old growth red pine. Even the floor joists under the house are beautiful straight grained.
Currently the existing house has 9 foot ceilings but that is because they were dropped over a foot when they ran lighting.
AFTER the addition is finished I plan to redo the living room and will raise the ceiling back up to the original height.
what we did when we redid the ceilings in our cousin's house. The house was built in the late 1700s. He wanted to pull down the old sheet rock that someone had put up and had cracked. So we pulled it down and then just stood there looking up with our mouths wide open.

There before us were the most beautiful log floor/ceiling joist ever seen. They were logs the had been hand hewn flat on one side for the upstairs floor to rest on. The rest of the logs had the branches/limbs cut off leaving the stubs. Whoever put the sheet rock up had shimmed the log to sheet rock space to make the ceiling flat. We removed the tacked on shims, cleaned the logs and called it a job done.


Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #19
House Elevation OLD.jpg
The plan is to take the existing elevation above and mirror the addition to the right

House Elevation NEW.jpg
So we end up with this.
The existing porch on the left is too narrow to have chairs for afternoon/evenings but the new porch on the right will be twice as deep so it will allow a porch swing, etc.
Since the front of the house (porch side) faces East it is quite nice for evenings.
 

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Looks great. Thanks for sharing this with us…please and keep us posted on the progress. You mention grandkids, is this a retirement project?
 
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