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GTT's Pilot in Command (PIC)
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Someone on another thread asked me to post a couple of photos of my Avery. If I ever win the lottery, this is my restore project. I may have told this story in the past here, and if I have, my apologies.

This tractor was the first piece of motorized farm equipment on my grandparents' farm, when my dad was just a child. My granddad traded in the 2 plow mules on the tractor. All 3 kids cried, because they didn't want to see the mules go. The mules went to work in the rice fields in Louisiana, where, at the time, they couldn't get the available motorized stuff in to work there, due to the wet conditions.

When my grandded passed away, the tractor became my dad's. I was still quite young at the time, and rode several hours on the tractor when dad was driving it. (I know, safety police would cry foul today, probably rightly so, but it sure made some good memories!) When my dad passed away, the tractor became mine. So, she is still technically, a "one owner" girl!

I thought she was a 1936 model for a long time, but looking at her data plate and serial number, she is a 1941 model, according to what I can find online. Sorry for any confusion.
 

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Someone on another thread asked me to post a couple of photos of my Avery. If I ever win the lottery, this is my restore project. I may have told this story in the past here, and if I have, my apologies.

This tractor was the first piece of motorized farm equipment on my grandparents' farm, when my dad was just a child. My granddad traded in the 2 plow mules on the tractor. All 3 kids cried, because they didn't want to see the mules go. The mules went to work in the rice fields in Louisiana, where, at the time, they couldn't get the available motorized stuff in to work there, due to the wet conditions.

When my grandded passed away, the tractor became my dad's. I was still quite young at the time, and rode several hours on the tractor when dad was driving it. (I know, safety police would cry foul today, probably rightly so, but it sure made some good memories!) When my dad passed away, the tractor became mine. So, she is still technically, a "one owner" girl!

I thought she was a 1936 model for a long time, but looking at her data plate and serial number, she is a 1941 model, according to what I can find online. Sorry for any confusion.
Thanks for the photos, farmgirl.

That looks like a great restore project. Hope you can find a way to do it. But more importantly it is part of your family's history, and that is part of America's history. :thumbup1gif:

Rich
 

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Looks like a great project! She is beautifully aged:thumbup1gif:
 

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Thanks for the pics! Model "A"?

I used to have a 1948 model "V" in the early 70's. ~~ Lowell
 

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My dad had an Avery almost identical to this. His dad had bought it sometime in the '40's and used it for several years raising tobacco on his farm. When my gfather died in 1958 on of his sons took over running the farm. The Avery was parked in the barn. My father "confiscated" about ten acres in the '60's of the family farm on the Kentucky River to use as a weekend retreat/fishing cabin. He was wanting a small tractor to keep the weeds down around his camp and started messing with the old Avery. He got it running in no time, got an old horse drawn sickle bar mower also on the farm and used it to mow his camp. Something happened to the tricycle wheels on the front at some point and he couldn't find parts so he put a Volkswagen front end on it. It worked great. When he died it was sold.
 

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GTT's Pilot in Command (PIC)
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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the pics! Model "A"?

I used to have a 1948 model "V" in the early 70's. ~~ Lowell
No, mine is a model GG. There were 2 Avery companies near the same time frame, although I do not think their years of manufacture overlapped. One Avery was actually made by the Cleveland Tractor Company. That is the company that made mine, and it was also called, "The General". If memory serves, I think these were sold through Montgomery Wards. (Back then, what wasn't sold thru MW?)

I'd have to look and check my facts on the companies, but I know mine is a GG, as it still has its original tractor serial number plate, as well as the original engine plate.

I'd love to see photos of other Avery tractors.
 

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Does it run or at least turn over?
That's one of those tractors I'd have trouble restoring, just keep it running and mechanically sound. It looks great like it is (well, maybe stick a new steering wheel on it :laugh: ).
 

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GTT's Pilot in Command (PIC)
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Discussion Starter #9
andy b. It only has a hand crank on it. I have always had a hard time getting it turned with that. I just don't seem to have the shoulder strength consistently to always be successful. It not only needs a new steering wheel, but also a new seat. While the old steel seat didn't seem that bad when I was younger, in the Texas summers, one could brand that pattern onto theor behind, if not careful. I might just opt for a decent removable cushion, that would fit well and stay in one place.
 

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GTT's Pilot in Command (PIC)
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Discussion Starter #11
Photo #3 sure looks like a starter, with no cables going to it. :unknown:
It had one, until dad got tired of it NEVER working, and removed the thing. It had fenders at one time too. I used to ride on one of those. If I get to restore it, I'll want some cables from a battery to the starter. I think I could find an old floor mounted light dimmer switch from an old car, to remake the foot starter pedal, that was there.

Good observation, 56Ford!
 

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Photo #3 sure looks like a starter, with no cables going to it. :unknown:
I concur.


Even just slowly turning it over once in a while will do wonders keeping it free and easy to get running later. Dump some Marvel Mystery Oil in the spark plug holes before and after turning it over. I love that stuff. Round engine mechs have been using it for a long time.
 

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I'm with Jason, if you can crank it over a few times somehow once every few months it will prevent the engine from getting stuck. If it's already stuck, then I guess you may as well start soaking it.:laugh:
 
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