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OK< I am looking for a little advice from you's well in the know guys(gals too)

I was in process of buying a farm, a 100+ yr old farm, the old farmer there bought a JD model A tractor in 1941, he kept it in a barn since day one too
he told be about a yr later he bought a cultivator for it, don't know yr for sure but he got it in about 1942-43, so,??

Wel he passed away and the farm went into a law suit as family was fighting over everything
I wanted to BUY the Model A tractor, BUT they wouldn't sell to me?? as another family member HAD to have it
BUT< the cultivator attachment for it, I got?? as Family member said they didn;t want it, and I could have it so, I took it, and all the parts that looked like they went with it

I now have it and NOT sure what to do with it, or IF I have ALL the parts or not, and or What its worth?
close friend of mine wants it, can said tell him what I want for it, and he'd pay fair market value for it
BUT what is that???
can anyone help me here??
I have a few pictures of the cultivators, BUT not of all the parts I took, as I have them in two different places right now and am NOT near either one,
But it all seemed like it was there and , it was stored in a building, BUT it had a dirt floor, SO< it wasn't sitting out in weather really, so pretty solid, minus some wear from use and age/rust from that all


here are a few pic's of what I have and sorry I am NOT very good at taking pic's and didn;t think to take pic's of the one before NEW farm stuff pictures 096.jpg NEW farm stuff pictures 097.jpg NEW farm stuff pictures 098.jpg wood stove 004.JPG wood stove 006.JPG i added a bunch of straps, as I hwas hauling a wood stove too from farm that day
appreciate any advice, help
 

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From the looks of it I'd say you have the main cultivators for the R side L side and rear of the tractor. I am guessing though you are probably missing some linkage and mounting brackets though. Odds are if something was bolted to the tractor and could stay on while still removing the cultivator than most likely it is probably still there.

As for value on it thats where things get kind of cloudy. Really comes down to what the buyer is willing to pay. An individual that is a big JD collector might pony some money for it if he needs it to "complete" his tractor. I'm guessing that these old Model A cultivators are few and far between now.

I know that a farmall cub complete cultivator set will generally fetch ball park of 250 -450 dollars but they are also more prevalent and getting an interest in them again not only from collectors but also organic farmers. 15 years ago you probably could have got them for scrap price.


Below is a link of a vid of an A with a cultivator. Hopefully it will give you a better idea if you have all the pieces.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LT6LaXLcBgs
 

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What I see are the two front sides of probably an "ABG 200" two row. In our area, the curved "scratchers" were used on a separate frame that attached to the rear axle housing, shovels were used on the front here (different areas may use different tools). What you have would bolt to the frame & the two bolts at the top of the front of the tractor. What I don't see are the lift pipes or the lift arms that clamp to the rockshaft. The lift arms are often left on the rockshaft year round. The pipes have pins attached the fit into the big holes on the flat arm that sticks up on the main cultivator frame & pins into the lift arms.

Another part, which yours probably never had would be the "quick-tach" bracket, which made these cultivators much easier to hook to the tractor. It fastened the two sections you have together & hooked over knobs on the front & sides of the tractor & a "tongue" on the front. This setup used one bolt on each side to bolt the cultivator to the tractor frame.
As for value, I can't help you there.
 

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What I see are the two front sides of probably an "ABG 200" two row. In our area, the curved "scratchers" were used on a separate frame that attached to the rear axle housing, shovels were used on the front here (different areas may use different tools). What you have would bolt to the frame & the two bolts at the top of the front of the tractor.
What I don't see are the lift pipes or the lift arms that clamp to the rockshaft. The lift arms are often left on the rockshaft year round. The pipes have pins attached the fit into the big holes on the flat arm that sticks up on the main cultivator frame & pins into the lift arms.

Another part, which yours probably never had would be the "quick-tach" bracket, which made these cultivators much easier to hook to the tractor. It fastened the two sections you have together & hooked over knobs on the front & sides of the tractor & a "tongue" on the front. This setup used one bolt on each side to bolt the cultivator to the tractor frame.
As for value, I can't help you there.[/QUOTE
]
grnspot110, them bolts u were referring to my uncle called them acron bolts and could be left on the frame also all the time. the cultivator frame slid over them and into a groove and then u just tighten them back up again, the front plate above the pony tire pedsal was used to hold the center front frame work up too. u just pull in the center and hook the arms to rock shaft, slide the sides onto the acron bolts, take the jacks out that held everything up and u was ready. my uncle just hated mounting my grandpaps, cause I would tease him why did it take him so long to hook it up. as long as one side didn't fall off the jack stand, things didn't go too bad. a lot of farmers around my area would park theirs under a tree and then chain them so the stands won't fall over. good find oh. my grandpaps are still on my aunts hill sitting on a 2 wheel trailer, they was bought in 1944 along with a jd b on steel spades, because of the war, and rubber tires wasn't available till later that yr. in 1966 when he bought his model 50, the culivators had to be widened to fit the model 50. big jim
 

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Found this picture of an ABG 200 with the "quick-tach: ABG 200.jpg Not all cultivators had the "quick-tach" brackets.

Still no "back scratchers" to scratch out the tire tracks though.
 

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Found this picture of an ABG 200 with the "quick-tach: View attachment 48324 Not all cultivators had the "quick-tach" brackets.

Still no "back scratchers" to scratch out the tire tracks though.
grnspot110; I wonder if jd even had a set of cultivators to factory fit the model 50,60,70. I guess jd had cultivators for the 3pt hitch then? I've never thought about it till now. their was no 3pt on my paps 50 or mine so I guess the farmer would of had no choice to do but what mine did and widened out his 200 to fit the 50, back then. thanks big jim
 

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grnspot110; I wonder if jd even had a set of cultivators to factory fit the model 50,60,70. I guess jd had cultivators for the 3pt hitch then? I've never thought about it till now. their was no 3pt on my paps 50 or mine so I guess the farmer would of had no choice to do but what mine did and widened out his 200 to fit the 50, back then. thanks big jim
There was a newer number, but I don't remember what it was. We had an ABG 400 that, I think, Dad bought new for his 51 "G". It had steel gauge wheels, the newer 4-row we had used semi-pneumatic rubber tires. I've forgotten which one we widened with new brackets to fit the 720D, both were "quick-tach".

I've never used a two row or 3-pt!
 

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There was a newer number, but I don't remember what it was. We had an ABG 400 that, I think, Dad bought new for his 51 "G". It had steel gauge wheels, the newer 4-row we had used semi-pneumatic rubber tires. I've forgotten which one we widened with new brackets to fit the 720D, both were "quick-tach".

I've never used a two row or 3-pt!
so from 1944 till 1951 they came out with the 4 row. didn't know that. what did youn's use before the G.
 

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so from 1944 till 1951 they came out with the 4 row. didn't know that. what did youn's use before the G.
The 51 G is the first tractor I remember, Dad started out with a 36 A & I think there was another G before the 51, both used when he bought them. I grew up on a 53-60 & the 58-720D!
 

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There was also front mounted cultivators for the New Generation tractors. Dad bought a '63 4010-D at an auction Dec. 11, 1968, tractor had WFE, the Roll-O-Matic & narrow frt tires was the next item sold and somebody else wanted a LOT worse than Dad, Dad let it go at $400 and only paid $3600 for the tractor! Next item was the 4RW front mounted cultivator. Think Dad paid $500. Included all the brackets & lift links. There was a support bar that bolted on engine around thermostat/water pump, cultivator sat back a foot or so compared to cultivators used on NFE tractors to clear the wfe & 11LX15 front tires. Had a pipe running from rear rockshaft about 6 inches above the platform to the left side gang, right side gang raised with the remote cylinder. That pipe from the rockshaft almost got me a couple times, just the right height to trip a guy up and have him do a face plant in the center gangs of that side of the cultivator. I seldom got on/off on the right but did when the cultivator was on! No rear gang at all with this cultivator. I have no idea of what a model number would have been for this cultivator.

The 4010 was a decent tractor to cultivate with, plenty of power, foot throttle to control speed, cultivate for days on a tank of fuel, great power steering, but the one BIG GRIPE is that a WFE 4010 will NOT turn off four 38" rows and back onto the next four 38" corn rows! It would probably turn O-K with six 38" rows or eight 30" rows. I don't think it would work on 6-30's either. I finally started taking the first 4 rows, skipping four and taking the third set of four, skipping the 4th set of 4 and taking 5th set of 4, then turning back the other way and take the second set of 4. Wasted a lot of time on the end rows but better than wiping out the end rows sliding the inside rear wheel over 2-3 rows of corn/beans. After cultivating for years with Super M-TA & 450 FARMALL that could pivot turn on the inside wheel, making taking 4 rows and taking the next four a snap, the lack of ability to turn sharp was a problem.

Dad tried every new gadget that came along to eliminate cultivator fenders, the dirt shields next to the rows. The rolling shields were better, but just a little. The best new thing was a little moldboard that were available in left & right versions, bolted on with the sweeps next to the row. First time over in tiny corn/beans throw the dirt away from the row, once corn/beans were 6 inches or so tall, reverse the moldboards across the row and throw dirt into the row. I laid by 20 acres of corn one afternoon in about two hours. I'd turn on headlands in 4th gear, stop, drop cultivator, shift to 7th, ease the clutch out and accelerate to 1800-2000 rpm with the foot throttle, about 8+ mph. Dad mentioned that fall picking corn that he'd never picked a field "THAT SMOOTH". Those little moldboards were REALLY throwing the dirt, field was clean with no weed killers either.
 
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