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Discussion Starter #1
Ok Guys. Cranked her up this afternoon, all was normal on idle warm up.

Had the tiller attached. Lifted it up a little to drain and change oil. Boosted the RPM a little to do so as it is heavy and the pump would keep the tiller up. It drops an inch or 2 and system would lift. Normal thus far with all implements.

This took 10 min or so and when complete I looked up and tractor was blowing black smoke...I mean blowing it!

I moved tractor over to garage, smoke increased with rpm rise. Parked...dropped throttle lever back down to shut down...but the rpm stayed high! The only way to shut down was to shut fuel off.
Restarted hour later after cleaning air filter etc...and piddling otherwise and same thing....smoke. no power loss it seemed.
I will say this time I did not shut fuel off. I pulled lever back to shut down as normal and though the rpm stayed high it Slowly petered down and shut down on own.

So, what have out on me?
 

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Ok Guys. Cranked her up this afternoon, all was normal on idle warm up.

Had the tiller attached. Lifted it up a little to drain and change oil. Boosted the RPM a little to do so as it is heavy and the pump would keep the tiller up. It drops an inch or 2 and system would lift. Normal thus far with all implements.

This took 10 min or so and when complete I looked up and tractor was blowing black smoke...I mean blowing it!

I moved tractor over to garage, smoke increased with rpm rise. Parked...dropped throttle lever back down to shut down...but the rpm stayed high! The only way to shut down was to shut fuel off.
Restarted hour later after cleaning air filter etc...and piddling otherwise and same thing....smoke. no power loss it seemed.
I will say this time I did not shut fuel off. I pulled lever back to shut down as normal and though the rpm stayed high it Slowly petered down and shut down on own. A blown turbo seal can let oil in the intake and cause a run away engine burning the oil even if shut down on some diesels if you can't stop the air. So it may also cause black smoke with a small leak? Do you have a Turbo on the engine?
So, what have out on me?
Black Smoke un burned fuel. Low compression, bad pump, bad injectors not sure. Watch tractor pulls now that is some unburnt fuel coming out those stacks. Oil is normally blue but diesels fuel is close to oil and it may burn black to. If it was Gasoline it would have flooded the engine out blowing black smoke the plug would foul fast. I just blew up my Tiller and you should have seen the Blue Smoke I am sure I sucked oil into the combustion chamber till the plug gave out. This was not fuel related.
 

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This is the tractor you just did the head gasket/repairs too?

Is there a way to check comprssion on a diesel?

Seems you had to modify the gasket...possible issue there?
 

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Black Smoke un burned fuel. Low compression, bad pump, bad injectors not sure. Watch tractor pulls now that is some unburnt fuel coming out those stacks. Oil is normally blue but diesels fuel is close to oil and it may burn black to. If it was Gasoline it would have flooded the engine out blowing black smoke the plug would foul fast. I just blew up my Tiller and you should have seen the Blue Smoke I am sure I sucked oil into the combustion chamber till the plug gave out. This was not fuel related.
I respectfully disagree sir.

White smoke is unburnt fuel.

Black smoke is too much fuel, too little air.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It is..though that was done a while back I cant look past that possibility. Though I'm leaning to something govenor/pump related. It was strange to me why even controlling the throttle on side of engine it had no control on rpm...down. I could increase.

Wasnt under any load other than running the hydro to keep the tiller up while I changed oil...

I hoping we can come up with the simple fix haha

Can compression test, just have to have the higher reading gauge
 

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I respectfully disagree sir.

White smoke is unburnt fuel.

Black smoke is too much fuel, too little air.
I guess your right means the same to me. Used to sit next to a bunch of water tenders in the mornings starting up to go out and warming up the engines. I would fire off my Cat 3406C and no smoke even in the winter. Now a lot of the guys around me there's ran like a freight train blowing black smoke and I was told till they warmed up they could not burn all the fuel and ran black? I used to start mine inside a cold building in the winter and no soot or black smoke on my white ceiling. Was also told Cats don't smoke like others do??? Did not know that diesels blue white smoke much except on turning them over and firing off the cylinders. Thanks!

I did a little looking on line and found this on a Mechanics Site; There’s a common misconception among drivers of gasoline engine cars that diesel engines are “dirty,” and that black smoke is emitted from all of them. That’s actually not the case. Take a look at any well-maintained diesel car, and you won’t notice any black smoke from the tailpipe. It’s actually a symptom of poor maintenance and failing components, not a symptom of burning diesel on its own.
What is the smoke?
Black smoke from a diesel engine is actually unburned diesel. If the engine and other components were properly maintained, that material would actually be burned in the engine. So, you can immediately tell that any diesel engine spewing black smoke is not getting the fuel mileage it should.
What causes it?
The primary cause of black smoke from a diesel is an incorrect air to fuel ratio. Either there is too much fuel being injected into the engine, or there is too little air. Either way, the result is the same. Notably, some drivers actually pay to have their vehicles modified to do this. It’s called “rolling coal,” and you’ll see it primarily with diesel pickup trucks (it’s costly and wasteful, as well).
Another cause of this problem is poor injector maintenance, but there are several others, as well. These include the following:
Blocked or clogged air filter or air intake
Contaminated fuel (grit or wax for instance)
Worn camshafts
Incorrect tappet adjustment
Incorrect backpressure in the vehicle’s exhaust
Dirty/clogged fuel filter
Damaged fuel pump
Finally, you may notice black smoke from a diesel engine because the driver is “lugging” it. Essentially, this refers to staying in a high gear for too long. You’ll notice this most with big rigs on the interstate, but you can also see it with other diesel engines to an extent.
smoke exhaust system Diesel
 

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More information and I learned more from it.

With an ASE-certified master mechanic on staff, we get all sorts of questions about gas and diesel engine problems. Some of them are pretty general and hard to diagnose through a quick conversation. Not that we aim to be able to do that for everyone, but it's nice when we're able to shed some light on a problem that makes another person feel more confident in being able to go out and make the right decisions in solving their problems.
"Black smoke" is one of those general symptoms that seems to indicate a problem, but which bears further investigation to figure out what the cause is. Really, any smoke would fall into this category. Because you've not just got black smoke, there's also white diesel smoke and even blue diesel smoke. So let's do a quick rundown of what to suspect what you've got diesel smoke where it shouldn't be.

Black Smoke*- this is the most common one and is really just an imbalance in the air to fuel ratio - too much fuel to not enough air. This means either too much fuel is being added to the mix or there's not enough oxygen being supplied to burn the fuel. The black smoke is full of particulates that are basically large diesel particles that normally would be burned as fuel. Any way you look at it, a diesel truck emitting black smoke is not going to be getting the optimal fuel mileage it should be getting.
Most common causes of black smoke are faulty injectors, a faulty injector pump, a bad air filter (causing not enough oxygen to be supplied), a bad EGR valve (causing the valves to clog) or even a bad turbocharger. Some of these are easy fixes.

White Smoke*- white smoke means that the fuel that is being injected into the combustion chamber is not being burned properly. The common causes that produce white smoke range from something as simple as low engine compression or water in the fuel to the fuel pump timing being thrown off because something is starving the fuel from getting to the pump in the manner necessary for the pump to time and work correctly.
Blue Smoke*- blue smoke results from burning engine oil. This is a mechanical problem because engine oil isn't supposed to be getting into areas where it can be burned. There could be a faulty injector pump or lift pump, which would allow oil to mix with fuel and be burned. The valves or valve stem seals could be bad. Worn cylinders and piston rings (X-tra Lube can help with this problem) allows oil to seep where it shouldn't. Or you could have a problem as simple as having put too much oil in the engine.
 

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I would start by trying to figure out why you had to cut the fuel off to shut it down, maybe something with the linkage to the injector Jump? My 1050 (I would assume yours also) also has that neat little “gas pedal” by your right foot, could that have been stuck down?

As far as black smoke, s—t my 1050 smokes a little whenever I’m working it hard, and any time i spike the throttle, but I don’t know how much yours was smoking? All I know is when I’m brushhogging, I’m out there rollin’ coal. :greentractorride:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ok guys just wanted to finish this one out for the Next Guy in need!

The issue turned out to be a sliver of metal in the fuel pump.

The Main Fuel Line feeding the Pump from the filter hooks up to a fitting that also has the Bleed Screw combined. When I took apart I noticed it was chipped on the inside at the bottom of the threads. As I continued to dis-assemble, against the service manuals wishes...whenever its says dont go any further..take to your dealer....Naturally I continue to tear apart..! Why not!

So everything in my Logical thinking Brain said it all looked good. When I was putting back together I noticed a sliver of Metal Jammed in the Groove of one of the Plungers. Got out the dental pick, snapped it out, Buttoned everything up. Bleed my lines with help of the air hose, fired right up...

No Smoke!...Back running like a Champ.

I dont know how the little chip broke off the fitting, but it wedged just as perfect as it could in that groove. I suppose it just helped hold the plunger open Dumping fuel to the injector..

Dont know what else it could've been.

Now on to figure why my Bush Hog and Tractor sound like a Giant Buzz Bait when working. Just replaced seals in mower gear box, put a tube of Grease and gear oil in...makes a buncha racket....Always Something!
 
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