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ok i got a 4560 only overheating when i plow over 1500 RPMS or when outside temp is over 85 degrees. my mechanic thought it was the fan clutch Velocity something. Asked the dealership for their opinion and he said its possible. But he also said it could just be a sensor. But id ont think so cause it doesnt do it everytime but only when its hot or i am plowing. So JD dealership wanted $724 for a new one found used one online for $220 plus shipping. Replaced that still same issue.. what do you guys think it is? what would be the next step?
 

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ok i got a 4560 only overheating when i plow over 1500 RPMS or when outside temp is over 85 degrees. my mechanic thought it was the fan clutch Velocity something. Asked the dealership for their opinion and he said its possible. But he also said it could just be a sensor. But id ont think so cause it doesnt do it everytime but only when its hot or i am plowing. So JD dealership wanted $724 for a new one found used one online for $220 plus shipping. Replaced that still same issue.. what do you guys think it is? what would be the next step?
Did it you check the coolant level and condition?

The fan is probably driven by a belt. Make sure it is in good shape. If it is original I'd replace it. Either way make sure it is tight enough. If it is slipping that could be your problem.

When you turn a good clutch fan by hand it should have some resistance. It shouldn't have any side to side movement. You should also be able to hear the fan moving the air with the engine running. It will only do this when cold (just after you start it the first time) or if it's hot enough.
 

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This is going to have to be a process of elimination.

First, as stated above, is the coolant level OK? Are all the intake screens for the radiator clean? Is the radiator itself clean from dust and debris?

I would then be looking at a flow restriction somewhere. I don't know if your engine has a coolant filter, but if it does then change it.

Next would be the possibility of the thermostat not opening fully - I would change that next.

Failing all that, next would be to get the radiator tested for proper flow to be sure there were no restrictions in it.

That's all I can think of that would cause over heating only when under a heavy load. There has to be a restriction to the coolant flow somewhere.
 

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All good recommendations so far. Always check the easy stuff first. :thumbup1gif:

  • Coolant Level?
  • Fan Belt & Tension? Replace the belt if glazed.
  • Correct Belt? Length, Width and Pitch?
  • Check for worn pulleys. Yup. Worn pulleys. The back side of the belt should stand proud of the pulley groove and never bottom-out.
  • Thermostat might be bad. Cheap fix. May also be stuck open and not allowing the coolant to shed heat in the radiator.
  • Coolant filter restricted as was mentioned?
  • You can also check for flow in the radiator using an infra-red heat gun. Cold spots indicate restricted flow due to deposits.
  • Used-replacement thermostatic fan clutch may be bad?
Good luck with your trouble-shooting
 

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One more

All good recommendations so far. Always check the easy stuff first. :thumbup1gif:

  • Coolant Level?
  • Fan Belt & Tension? Replace the belt if glazed.
  • Correct Belt? Length, Width and Pitch?
  • Check for worn pulleys. Yup. Worn pulleys. The back side of the belt should stand proud of the pulley groove and never bottom-out.
  • Thermostat might be bad. Cheap fix. May also be stuck open and not allowing the coolant to shed heat in the radiator.
  • Coolant filter restricted as was mentioned?
  • You can also check for flow in the radiator using an infra-red heat gun. Cold spots indicate restricted flow due to deposits.
  • Used-replacement thermostatic fan clutch may be bad?
Good luck with your trouble-shooting
You might have said this but the coolant itself should be checked. Generally a 50/50 mix removes heat better than either straight water or pure antifreeze.

Treefarmer
 

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All good advice but I can't put enough emphasis on making sure the radiator core and oil cooler/condenser is clean and you are getting good air flow through the radiator. Remove the side screen when engine is hot and run at full throttle. Place your hand in front of the oil cooler and see if you can feel strong air flow going through all the way around the cooler. I am betting there is significant blockage especially around the center area. They can appear clean at a casual glance but have dirt embedded in the fins. remove the hood and slide the oil cooler to the side and really look deep into the fins of the oil cooler and radiator. The best way to clean them is a high pressure washer. You need to be sure to direct the water straight through the fins to prevent bending the fins over and having that block air flow. You will probably be surprised at how much dirt can be washed out of it.
 

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I used to moldboard plow with a 4630,, very similar tractor size.

I could make the tractor overheat, on demand, by doing one of two things.
1) drop the plow slightly,, the extra pull would overheat the tractor.
2) shift up a gear,, the tractor could pull the plow,, but it would overheat.

In neither case did the tractor sound like it was even laboring.

The same was true for the 820, 4020, and 930 Case,,
they all had more engine than cooling capacity.
We plowed with all of them,, at some time.
 
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