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At 189 hours on my 1025R I checked with the local dealer who quoted me over $600 to do the 200 Hr service. Wondering what that was about I checked into it, and of course discovered what you all already know, that you can get the parts/oils you need at GreenTractorParts.com, and just go for it. The only thing to be careful to get right is to also order the correct air filter kit - it doesn't come with the 200 Hr service bundle as you have to determine which filter housing you have.

It's really only two fluid changes, and the fuel and air filters. It's easier than on a car actually as there are no lifts involved. Watch a couple videos and have a few tools handy and save yourself like $450 with 2 hours of labor. Just do it!

A couple of things i found helpful... Power wash or at least hose down the dirt so you're working in a cleaner environment. Do take the rear wheel off. It's just easier that way. If you have weights or pickle juice in the tires it adds a little work, but the access is worth it IMHO. You don't need to mess with the hose clamps at the hydraulic fluid screen fitting at all if you follow TTWT's video advice about loosening the 13mm bolt at the back. When re-installing, fit the open/outer screen end into the external fitting before attempting to push it back into the oil pan. That way it will be already centered where it belongs. Also, use a Solo cup under the fuel filter and you'll avoid any fuel hitting the floor at all. The tractor will probably stall on the first start after the filter's been re-installed but that's all. If you have compressed air, blow out the radiator from the back to clear the inevitable debris and dust. My tractor had a lot of funk in the radiator as I work it in dusty conditions a lot.

Also check your tractor for loose or missing bolts. I had one missing on the alternator bracket inner-end so the fan belt wasn't actually tight at all. Once replaced I was able to create the correct tension.

Hit all the zerks with grease, and check the front axle for Hygard level...

Super easy, and I really don't understand how they can get $600 for that short amount of work.
 

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Yep I did mine myself. It's pretty simple. I also got my kit from Green Parts Store.com
 

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I never found it was easier to take the rear wheel off ...Have done it with and without .... the last 2 times I left it on and it was just faster.

Never watched Tim's vids on this , as I did mine long before he started.
 

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Yeah, I hear ya.....

I had my dealer do the 50 hour service too on my x739, primarily because of the hydraulic system, but also as I felt it a good idea to have them do the service and look over the machine and ask a few questions as a new owner of these type of implements. I especially wasn't sure of specific potential issues changing out the hydro system, so I decided it was best - this time - to have their people do it. They would also be much more familiar with anything typical customers might miss - even one who takes care of their equipment - such that there isn't things left out of the maintenance routine. I went a couple grease rounds before I figured out that there was the U-joint on the main shaft near the flywheel, a really important spot which is really easy to miss.

I was able to converse with the mechanic before and after servicing the machine, and it clarified quite a bit, particularly with their shop and my understanding of it, which helps a good deal. Even with all of the digging around here, I still find that I miss a thing or two and learn things, and want to make sure the maintenance is complete. But yet also, I used the time with the mechanic to understand more about my machine, and to ask questions that will help me do it on my own as well as becoming more familiar with certain aspects.

All that said, I'll be rather likely to do my own next time, as the added time reading here and gaining experience with the tractor will make it much easier (and I won't be so tied down with other pressing spring issues, like building/finishing landscape work, etc). Paying the labor in this case and having that conversation probably was the better scenario, both to make sure it got done right but also such that I had a better understanding going forward, which will have me doing it myself next time.
 

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I was able to converse with the mechanic before and after servicing the machine, and it clarified quite a bit, particularly with their shop and my understanding of it, which helps a good deal. Even with all of the digging around here, I still find that I miss a thing or two and learn things, and want to make sure the maintenance is complete. But yet also, I used the time with the mechanic to understand more about my machine, and to ask questions that will help me do it on my own as well as becoming more familiar with certain aspects.
You must live in Nirvana or Shangri La. I want to move there!

It has been decades since I have actually been able to speak with the person who actually laid hands on my tractor, implement, trucks, cars, or trailers. They are typically in the shop, which customers are not allowed to enter.
 

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You must live in Nirvana or Shangri La. I want to move there!

It has been decades since I have actually been able to speak with the person who actually laid hands on my tractor, implement, trucks, cars, or trailers. They are typically in the shop, which customers are not allowed to enter.
Guessing here- Might have been a mobile/at-home service.
 

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Guessing here- Might have been a mobile/at-home service.
Good point. The only time I had Deere come out to the farm, it was the actual dealer service manager.

He spent the entire time telling me about his trials and tribulations finding and trying to keep decent technicians, and about how he'd fired the tech who had done the setup on my equipment, how the guy had only lasted two weeks, along with stories about all the other things the guy had screwed up.
 

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You must live in Nirvana or Shangri La. I want to move there!

It has been decades since I have actually been able to speak with the person who actually laid hands on my tractor, implement, trucks, cars, or trailers. They are typically in the shop, which customers are not allowed to enter.
I am LOL at this comment...I can still go in ours (Littles in PA.) but yeah...distinct feeling they are tolerating but want to tell me to leave...and this was double masked and waving my vaccinated card... lol
 

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At 189 hours on my 1025R I checked with the local dealer who quoted me over $600 to do the 200 Hr service. Wondering what that was about I checked into it, and of course discovered what you all already know, that you can get the parts/oils you need at GreenTractorParts.com, and just go for it. The only thing to be careful to get right is to also order the correct air filter kit - it doesn't come with the 200 Hr service bundle as you have to determine which filter housing you have.

It's really only two fluid changes, and the fuel and air filters. It's easier than on a car actually as there are no lifts involved. Watch a couple videos and have a few tools handy and save yourself like $450 with 2 hours of labor. Just do it!

A couple of things i found helpful... Power wash or at least hose down the dirt so you're working in a cleaner environment. Do take the rear wheel off. It's just easier that way. If you have weights or pickle juice in the tires it adds a little work, but the access is worth it IMHO. You don't need to mess with the hose clamps at the hydraulic fluid screen fitting at all if you follow TTWT's video advice about loosening the 13mm bolt at the back. When re-installing, fit the open/outer screen end into the external fitting before attempting to push it back into the oil pan. That way it will be already centered where it belongs. Also, use a Solo cup under the fuel filter and you'll avoid any fuel hitting the floor at all. The tractor will probably stall on the first start after the filter's been re-installed but that's all. If you have compressed air, blow out the radiator from the back to clear the inevitable debris and dust. My tractor had a lot of funk in the radiator as I work it in dusty conditions a lot.

Also check your tractor for loose or missing bolts. I had one missing on the alternator bracket inner-end so the fan belt wasn't actually tight at all. Once replaced I was able to create the correct tension.

Hit all the zerks with grease, and check the front axle for Hygard level...

Super easy, and I really don't understand how they can get $600 for that short amount of work.
Good post - thanks! As a soon to be retiree, I'll be saving the $$ for sure. Not rocket science and pretty straight forward after maintaining everything else mechanical in my life for the last 45 years...
 

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I did mine about a month ago. I have a 2025r with loaded tires and of course I let it fall over. I was able to stand it back up but I bet my face turned red.
 

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I am LOL at this comment...I can still go in ours (Littles in PA.) but yeah...distinct feeling they are tolerating but want to tell me to leave...and this was double masked and waving my vaccinated card... lol
Which Littles? Mine (Ziglerville) the parts guys barely have their masks on, but they are behind the plexiglass anyway. Haven't been inside the service dept. so can't comment one way or the other. Always friendly service there, happy to have them as my dealer.
 

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Maybe I just got lucky with our dealer, but my experience has been generally that I can get questions answered and consult with the right people to get where I need to go. Not being able to do this even during the sales process was cause to find another dealer. But when I did call for that 50 hour service, they arranged to come get the machine, then I simply left a note for the tech about a little history on the machine as well as to discuss particulars for service on this trip, as I was actually at 60 hours and about 20 mo. of ownership (intermittent use due to lawn and exterior property renovation). So the tech called about five days later, when my turn came up in the queue, and we had a discussion about the tractor, what it should get based on hours as well as time, and set the proper service items on the order.

The mechanic had about 20 years in out there, seemed to appreciate an owner who wanted to take care of his machine as well as "mesh" their own maintenance into what their shop does (same greases used, etc). I've approached that back counter on several occasions and have always gotten reasonable/good/helpful answers to my questions.

I don't expect to talk to the actual mechanic every time I take the machine out there, but if I needed to I could go back to the mechanic's counter and odds are about 80% that the mechanic who worked on my tractor would be visible unless he's on lunch or temporarily out of the room. Most of that shop is clearly visible from the service shop counter, no great shakes or secret, although they did mention that I had done well to "beat the rush" as the lawn/garden/SCUT customers really come runnin' when the weather begins to warm, so I did sense that properly. It's a rural dealer about 25 minutes out of town, so I do benefit from having less "just passing by" sort of traffic, if you're on that property you went out of your way to get there, and they seem to treat people accordingly.
 
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At 189 hours on my 1025R I checked with the local dealer who quoted me over $600 to do the 200 Hr service. Wondering what that was about I checked into it, and of course discovered what you all already know, that you can get the parts/oils you need at GreenTractorParts.com, and just go for it. The only thing to be careful to get right is to also order the correct air filter kit - it doesn't come with the 200 Hr service bundle as you have to determine which filter housing you have.

It's really only two fluid changes, and the fuel and air filters. It's easier than on a car actually as there are no lifts involved. Watch a couple videos and have a few tools handy and save yourself like $450 with 2 hours of labor. Just do it!

A couple of things i found helpful... Power wash or at least hose down the dirt so you're working in a cleaner environment. Do take the rear wheel off. It's just easier that way. If you have weights or pickle juice in the tires it adds a little work, but the access is worth it IMHO. You don't need to mess with the hose clamps at the hydraulic fluid screen fitting at all if you follow TTWT's video advice about loosening the 13mm bolt at the back. When re-installing, fit the open/outer screen end into the external fitting before attempting to push it back into the oil pan. That way it will be already centered where it belongs. Also, use a Solo cup under the fuel filter and you'll avoid any fuel hitting the floor at all. The tractor will probably stall on the first start after the filter's been re-installed but that's all. If you have compressed air, blow out the radiator from the back to clear the inevitable debris and dust. My tractor had a lot of funk in the radiator as I work it in dusty conditions a lot.

Also check your tractor for loose or missing bolts. I had one missing on the alternator bracket inner-end so the fan belt wasn't actually tight at all. Once replaced I was able to create the correct tension.

Hit all the zerks with grease, and check the front axle for Hygard level...

Super easy, and I really don't understand how they can get $600 for that short amount of work.
Just ordered the kit from green parts store and saved over $30 in shipping by using ttwt in the coupon code field...
 
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