Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
442 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
First off I’m a diesel mechanic and I don’t usually work on gas powered stuff. My daughters rifle coach has a 20 year old son who beat his 2011 ram to the point that the engine has seized. He still has 4 years of payments to make on it. I offered to replace the engine to help save them some money. I have found a replacement engine with 50k miles on it. Is there anything I should do to this engine before installing it to help prevent future problems? Other than putting a block under the go pedal? Thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,321 Posts
Yea
Replace the driver
Seriously, check the exhaust manifold, replace the gasket and retorque if it’s a hemi. They’re real work horses but those years on up have developed premature exhaust leaks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,950 Posts
Yea
Replace the driver
Seriously, check the exhaust manifold, replace the gasket and retorque if it’s a hemi. They’re real work horses but those years on up have developed premature exhaust leaks
Best advice you can tell the rifle coach, give the kid a tricycle or a bicycle to use. Anyone that smart doesn't deserve to be driving anything I'm making payment on.
If he is smart enough to destroy the engine, hopefully he would be smart enough to get his hands dirty to help remove and install the replacement engine. If nothing else to go get or find tools for you, for me he wouldn't be in the house playing video games, no head sets on and no smartphone in his hand. 20 yrs old or 16 yrs old.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,528 Posts
What did he do to destroy the engine? Run it out of oil?

As others have said, the driver is far more of a problem than the 5.7L Hemi. They are good engines. The exhaust bolt breakage was one of the only problems I heard anything about from that era of Rams (I had a 2010 until 2017).

How does one end up with a 4+ year loan on a 10 year old vehicle? I didn't think banks go that long on vehicles that old.

Rob
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jimmy Walker

·
Registered
Joined
·
442 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
He’s not a bad kid just immature. Has no real direction in life. Works on a dairy farm. One of those that works hard and probably always will. Would benefit greatly from some time in the military. He told me the engine started making noise and stopped. The shop he took it to told him it’s seized and junk. He is aware I’m not working for free and he will be helping. How he got a loan for more than 3 years is not my concern. I will check exhaust manifold gaskets before the replacement goes in. Thank you for the reply’s
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
I have a 2012 Durango with a 5.7L Hemi. It's been emitting a smell during high rev acceleration and up hills when higher revs are needed. Been in the dealer shop 3 times for other stuff (coolant line, AC line, oil change) and they say they can't find anything else wrong. The smell is a burning rubber smell. The only reason I bring it up is that another poster said something about the engines from around that time. If anyone has any ideas, I'm all ears.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
Immature huh. Well nothing makes people figure their $%@ out faster than having to pay hard-earned money for breaking things because of carelessness. Lol. At least that helped me learn a few things. I also learned when it's okay to buy cheap stuff and when it's actually cheaper to buy the expensive stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
That kid needs some "skin-in-the-game." But that's not your issue to address. Hemi is a good engine, but like anything else, do the routine maintenance and it should run a long time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
Those engines of that era are pretty well known for lifter failures on the MDS (multiple displacement system) cylinders. Usually due to poor maintenance, but not always. They will wipe out camshaft lobes. They'll start by having a light tick, not to be confused with the ticking from the exhaust manifold bolts breaking and causing leaks. Then a single cylinder misfire due to low compression due to the worn lobe. If the mileage is low enough and the internals are fairly clean, then we will usually put a camshaft and all new lifters in them. If the engine is sludged up then we recommend a longblock. I wouldn't necessarily call these engine great engines, but it usually comes down to maintenance. Which is possibly lacking. Gotta fix the driver too!

As far as the replacement engine goes and how much you want to get into. I wouldn't touch the manifolds unless the bolts are already broken. (the heat shield will be loose). Other than that, new plugs, oil, drop it in and roll it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,528 Posts
Really? In my years of paying attention to half-ton Ram 4th Gen models (2009-2017) I can't recall ever hearing about that failure. And I followed all the Ram/Dodge forums during that time. I'm not saying it didn't happen, but I can't believe it was considered 'common' or 'likely'.

Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
I know I have personally had at least 10-20 failures in the past few years. All probably at mileages of 80k to 150k. I put head gaskets on one at 30k several years ago. And that's just at my shop. I would have to assume the ratios are similar everywhere. I have also seen several with over 200k with no issues. That's why I say it's usually maintenance related. The people that are on forums are usually a bit more finicky about maintaining there trucks I'd guess too. Now I don't just work on rams. We work on every make and model but it sure seems fairly common to me. My evidence is of course anecdotal, but that what I have to share. 🤷‍♂️
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
442 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I had also heard of the lifter failure on these engines. I assume that is what happened with this one but he chose to run it until it would no longer run. I would have much rather done cam and lifters than replace the engine. Oh well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
442 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I know I have personally had at least 10-20 failures in the past few years. All probably at mileages of 80k to 150k. I put head gaskets on one at 30k several years ago. And that's just at my shop. I would have to assume the ratios are similar everywhere. I have also seen several with over 200k with no issues. That's why I say it's usually maintenance related. The people that are on forums are usually a bit more finicky about maintaining there trucks I'd guess too. Now I don't just work on rams. We work on every make and model but it sure seems fairly common to me. My evidence is of course anecdotal, but that what I have to share. 🤷‍♂️
As I said in the beginning I am a diesel guy and heavy equipment tech. It sounds like you have removed a couple of these engines. Will I need anything out of the ordinary as far as tools? Will be working out of my service truck. It’s well equipped but I don’t carry everything in it that I have in my shop boxes. Is there a lot of torx screws/bolts in this? Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
Take a bunch of pictures as you take parts off of and disconnect things from the old engine. I always manage to get things back together but often is a struggle to to remember how things went.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
As I said in the beginning I am a diesel guy and heavy equipment tech. It sounds like you have removed a couple of these engines. Will I need anything out of the ordinary as far as tools? Will be working out of my service truck. It’s well equipped but I don’t carry everything in it that I have in my shop boxes. Is there a lot of torx screws/bolts in this? Thanks
Nothing special that I can remember. Should be pretty straight forward. Righty tighty, lefty loosey! You may want to pull the radiator for a little extra room. And to avoid accidentally damaging it. Leave the trans in and support the bell housing with a floor jack. It'll help with restabbing the engine. Make sure the dowel pins stay in place. Good luck!
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top