Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I bought a new 2019 5075e last November and it only has 55 hours on it. I just ran it for about an hour bush-hogging and the rear differential is too hot to touch. It produces steam when you try to spray it off. The hydraulic fluid is at the correct level in the site glass. Is this normal or should I see my dealer for a potential repair?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
It's more than normal temp rise. Problem could be many things from dragging brakes, slipping clutch, bad bearing, to improper gear form. I would: Document the temp with a photo of a temp. indicating instrument. (laser temp is nice) Also, get a oil sample for testing. (document how sample is taken) Then contact the dealer. Document, document, & document.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,010 Posts
I agree about documentation. My guess is internal leaking hyd valve is causing the heat.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,898 Posts
I also think it's the hydraulics overheating. Check your SCVs and make sure they are in neutral position.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,188 Posts
A few years back I remember reading about a 5 series; could have been a 5075E that got so hot it melted some of the plastics around the rear housing. If I'm not mistaken it may have damaged the fuel tank, rear deck and or wiring harness looms.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,465 Posts
Yes, here is a few post's on the heat issue:


 
  • Like
Reactions: kylew

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
At the last time my 5065E was repaired, there had been 3 GENERATIONS (or modifications) to the internal hydraulic valve that controls the rear 3 point hitch raising and lowering. At this point, I don't know how many more modifications have been made.

At the time the TIER 4-equipped units came out, Deere had changed the E Series as follows :
1- the mostest up-to-dateist internal hitch valve (this valve reads the setting from the hitch height setting quadrant control, and when the hitch reaches that setting, stops the hydrauilc oil flow - in otherwords - "equalizes" and stops the flowing oil. Without "equalization", the oil keeps flowing, and flowing, generating heat.

2- Installed a hydraulic oil cooler in front of the radiator, and necessary hydraulic lines to feed the cooler and return the cooled oil into the transmission sump. [On mine & earlier versions, the motor oil - engine oil is cooled through the radiator, but there is no hydraulic oil cooler on the tractor at all. 11 gallons of hydraulic-transmission oil in the sump was supposed to magically keep itself cool !!!]

3-Raised the fuel tank about an inch above the transmission housing, and added a tin foil insulation between.[On my unit and earlier versions, the fuel tank sits on top of the transmission housing behind the seat. My unit burned a hole in the bottom of the tank where it sits on the housing, TWICE in its first year of use. I'm talking a hole you could pass a soccer ball through !]

4- There were some changes to the brake system and brake valve in later units also. That hydraulic-transmission oil is also the braking fluid, and the brake disks are spinning in a pool of that oil. If the brakes are sticking, they are also generating heat, as well as casting off disk brake material (not good to be floating around inside the system)

You are welcomed to research my posts under the name COUV. I tried to be as detailed and specific as to what was happening, what repairs the Dealer attempted, etc., through the whole process.

Since I have purchased the unit, which has about 1,000 hours on it, every time the problems occurred, the tractor had John Deere Hy-Guard fluid, so someone's comment that the brand of oil was causing the problems is not a valid point.

When your unit gets out of warranty and you are performing the hyd-trans oil changes yourself, when you change the transmission filter located beneath the right floorboard, BE SURE TO REMOVE and CLEAN THE INTAKE SCREEN. It is located behind a diamond-shaped cover plate, to the right of the PTO shaft. That is where contamination and that brake material I mentioned above is going to accumulate, and in the process, starve the hydraulic pump for oil flow.

Couv
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
At the last time my 5065E was repaired, there had been 3 GENERATIONS (or modifications) to the internal hydraulic valve that controls the rear 3 point hitch raising and lowering. At this point, I don't know how many more modifications have been made.

At the time the TIER 4-equipped units came out, Deere had changed the E Series as follows :
1- the mostest up-to-dateist internal hitch valve (this valve reads the setting from the hitch height setting quadrant control, and when the hitch reaches that setting, stops the hydrauilc oil flow - in otherwords - "equalizes" and stops the flowing oil. Without "equalization", the oil keeps flowing, and flowing, generating heat.

2- Installed a hydraulic oil cooler in front of the radiator, and necessary hydraulic lines to feed the cooler and return the cooled oil into the transmission sump. [On mine & earlier versions, the motor oil - engine oil is cooled through the radiator, but there is no hydraulic oil cooler on the tractor at all. 11 gallons of hydraulic-transmission oil in the sump was supposed to magically keep itself cool !!!]

3-Raised the fuel tank about an inch above the transmission housing, and added a tin foil insulation between.[On my unit and earlier versions, the fuel tank sits on top of the transmission housing behind the seat. My unit burned a hole in the bottom of the tank where it sits on the housing, TWICE in its first year of use. I'm talking a hole you could pass a soccer ball through !]

4- There were some changes to the brake system and brake valve in later units also. That hydraulic-transmission oil is also the braking fluid, and the brake disks are spinning in a pool of that oil. If the brakes are sticking, they are also generating heat, as well as casting off disk brake material (not good to be floating around inside the system)

You are welcomed to research my posts under the name COUV. I tried to be as detailed and specific as to what was happening, what repairs the Dealer attempted, etc., through the whole process.

Since I have purchased the unit, which has about 1,000 hours on it, every time the problems occurred, the tractor had John Deere Hy-Guard fluid, so someone's comment that the brand of oil was causing the problems is not a valid point.

When your unit gets out of warranty and you are performing the hyd-trans oil changes yourself, when you change the transmission filter located beneath the right floorboard, BE SURE TO REMOVE and CLEAN THE INTAKE SCREEN. It is located behind a diamond-shaped cover plate, to the right of the PTO shaft. That is where contamination and that brake material I mentioned above is going to accumulate, and in the process, starve the hydraulic pump for oil flow.

Couv
Most excellent information. I will indeed monitor the intake screen as advised. Thanks for the excellent input.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,898 Posts
At the last time my 5065E was repaired, there had been 3 GENERATIONS (or modifications) to the internal hydraulic valve that controls the rear 3 point hitch raising and lowering. At this point, I don't know how many more modifications have been made.

At the time the TIER 4-equipped units came out, Deere had changed the E Series as follows :
1- the mostest up-to-dateist internal hitch valve (this valve reads the setting from the hitch height setting quadrant control, and when the hitch reaches that setting, stops the hydrauilc oil flow - in otherwords - "equalizes" and stops the flowing oil. Without "equalization", the oil keeps flowing, and flowing, generating heat.

2- Installed a hydraulic oil cooler in front of the radiator, and necessary hydraulic lines to feed the cooler and return the cooled oil into the transmission sump. [On mine & earlier versions, the motor oil - engine oil is cooled through the radiator, but there is no hydraulic oil cooler on the tractor at all. 11 gallons of hydraulic-transmission oil in the sump was supposed to magically keep itself cool !!!]

3-Raised the fuel tank about an inch above the transmission housing, and added a tin foil insulation between.[On my unit and earlier versions, the fuel tank sits on top of the transmission housing behind the seat. My unit burned a hole in the bottom of the tank where it sits on the housing, TWICE in its first year of use. I'm talking a hole you could pass a soccer ball through !]

4- There were some changes to the brake system and brake valve in later units also. That hydraulic-transmission oil is also the braking fluid, and the brake disks are spinning in a pool of that oil. If the brakes are sticking, they are also generating heat, as well as casting off disk brake material (not good to be floating around inside the system)

You are welcomed to research my posts under the name COUV. I tried to be as detailed and specific as to what was happening, what repairs the Dealer attempted, etc., through the whole process.

Since I have purchased the unit, which has about 1,000 hours on it, every time the problems occurred, the tractor had John Deere Hy-Guard fluid, so someone's comment that the brand of oil was causing the problems is not a valid point.

When your unit gets out of warranty and you are performing the hyd-trans oil changes yourself, when you change the transmission filter located beneath the right floorboard, BE SURE TO REMOVE and CLEAN THE INTAKE SCREEN. It is located behind a diamond-shaped cover plate, to the right of the PTO shaft. That is where contamination and that brake material I mentioned above is going to accumulate, and in the process, starve the hydraulic pump for oil flow.

Couv
No hydraulic oil cooler?(n)
What was JD thinking...……...save a few dollars? 🤬:mad:🤬:eek:🐒
My 46 year old JD 2030 HAS an oil cooler! (y)🤠:)
My JD 2030 has closed center hydraulics. I know the JD 50X5e series have open center hydraulics. I do NOT know if one system runs normally hotter than the other :unsure:

Thanks for putting all the changes/updates together in your post. It should be a "sticky" and/or in Tech Information! (y)
 
  • Like
Reactions: kylew

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
When your unit gets out of warranty and you are performing the hyd-trans oil changes yourself, when you change the transmission filter located beneath the right floorboard, BE SURE TO REMOVE and CLEAN THE INTAKE SCREEN. It is located behind a diamond-shaped cover plate, to the right of the PTO shaft. That is where contamination and that brake material I mentioned above is going to accumulate, and in the process, starve the hydraulic pump for oil flow.

Couv
I'm getting ready to do the100 hr oil change and transmission filter change on my 2019 5075e. Should I take the screen cover off and if I do, how much fluid will I lose?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
You need to drain the hydraulic oil before removing the screen cover, or it will all pour out the back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
You might try using vacuum to hold back the fluid. If I were to do this, A shop vac applied to the fill pipe. Have a clean shop vac container since any mistakes would suck oil into the vac bucket. AND have a suitable pan below the filter cover. (again for a mishap) The vac will hold the cover on too. SO... the vac has to be applied after the cover is removed and possible the filter too. That's why you need a helper to apply the vac hose to the fill pipe. The helper can vary the suction by proximity to the pipe opening. The only downside I see is the mess if this doesn't work. Alternately, you drain the oil before cleaning the filter and lose the entire oil fill.

Edit... you're changing the fluid...Drain & discard the whole fill .... 39 liters. 40 quarts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
I will wait until the transmission fluid needs to be changed before I look at the screen. The first service only calls for changing the filter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
Ive drained my hydraulic oil couple differant times and i put it in one of those cheap storage containers that you get a walmart, usually less than $5, I drain oil, change filter, clean screen if needed, then use a pitcher to pour oil back into tractor. This lets you inspect the oil and screens without wasting the oil. I leave about 1/2 gallon with any setament and top off with new oil.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top