Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This winter is the first year that I have the 2025R...my plan was to use the AF10F plow on my 450-ish feet of blacktop driveway. I have a walk-behind snowblower, which is a great machine, but for those 2-6 inch snows, the snowblower is very slow...when I bought the tractor, I figured a plow would just sail right through and do a great job in half the time it takes to snowblow.

Here's my trouble....getting the plow down to the ground. A buddy of mine owns a paving company and he plows in the winter...he suggested I adjust the plow about 1/4" off the driveway. If I do that, I can't seem to get the driveway clean and I end up with packed snow on the surface. You know the kind....the stuff that packs hard, turns super-slick and you never scrape off until the temps get above 40.

I hate to go back to the snowblower for the small snows....the tractor really is quicker (and much more fun!)

In some experimentation, I am running the plow edge and actually scraping the asphalt a bit. I can't imagine this is good in the long-term. Also, what is finicky is the height adjustment. I have the plow pucks adjusted so I can get the plow edge on the surface....by using the left/right function on the SCV, I can get the plow edge just up off the asphalt or down against.

I don't know.....am I missing something? And words of advice?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,670 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,508 Posts
A lot of people with black top use some sort of rubber or poly edge, maybe you could make one, stall mats like TSC sells work well from what I've read on here. I have a gravel driveway though so I cannot speak from experience, my shoes are always set 1/4-1/2".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
A lot of people with black top use some sort of rubber or poly edge, maybe you could make one, stall mats like TSC sells work well from what I've read on here. I have a gravel driveway though so I cannot speak from experience, my shoes are always set 1/4-1/2".
Do you find it tough to stay consistent with how close you keep the edge? I guess this is only an issue since I'm using a loader mounted plow...so I can put it in float-mode but still have the angle forward/backward to contend with. I try to use my bucket-level rod to stay consistent.

Maybe I'm overthinking things....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
Discussion Starter #5

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,670 Posts
Do you find it tough to stay consistent with how close you keep the edge? I guess this is only an issue since I'm using a loader mounted plow...so I can put it in float-mode but still have the angle forward/backward to contend with. I try to use my bucket-level rod to stay consistent.

Maybe I'm overthinking things....
Unless you are plowing on perfectly flat blacktop, there will always be variation in the set gap between the plow edge and the blacktop to moment the grade changes. Trying to adjust for those changes on-the-fly is nearly impossible even for the most experience plow-master! If you want a clear driveway, and you want to use your tractor and AF10F, you will need to change the plow edge as described in my prior response. You will never look back once you do the mod and ask yourself why you didn't do it sooner!


Sincerely
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,670 Posts
Thanks for the link...I'll see if that would fit my plow.
You will likely have to do some minor bit of fabricating to customize to your own plow blade.... not a big deal.... we can talk you through it....

Sincerely
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
In some experimentation, I am running the plow edge and actually scraping the asphalt a bit. I can't imagine this is good in the long-term.

That is 100% normal. If you drop the plow all the way down to scrape the driveway clean, the edge on the plow will wear down over time. That's why it's called a wear edge and that's why it is replaceable. I prefer to run a UHMW wear edge because it's much quieter than a steel edge, but it still wears down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,508 Posts
Do you find it tough to stay consistent with how close you keep the edge? I guess this is only an issue since I'm using a loader mounted plow...so I can put it in float-mode but still have the angle forward/backward to contend with. I try to use my bucket-level rod to stay consistent.

Maybe I'm overthinking things....
Overthinking a little, but not totally.

I marked my indicator rod with a piece of tape.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
That is 100% normal. If you drop the plow all the way down to scrape the driveway clean, the edge on the plow will wear down over time. That's why it's called a wear edge and that's why it is replaceable. I prefer to run a UHMW wear edge because it's much quieter than a steel edge, but it still wears down.
Good point about it being a "wear edge"...I think it just sounds worse than it really is. I am running in float-mode with the edge-trip unlocked, so if I do hit a spot that is uneven, it should trip forward or float the edge up.

Part of it is also lack of experience. I'm in south east PA and there is some snow in the forecast this weekend, so I'll hopefully get more experiment time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
Discussion Starter #11

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
Good point about it being a "wear edge"...I think it just sounds worse than it really is. I am running in float-mode with the edge-trip unlocked, so if I do hit a spot that is uneven, it should trip forward or float the edge up.

Part of it is also lack of experience. I'm in south east PA and there is some snow in the forecast this weekend, so I'll hopefully get more experiment time.
I have the crappy little 54" Deere plow and when I first got it I did exactly what you've been doing. I figured I'd "save" the wear edge by adjusting the skid feet down a little and leave a gap.

That just ate the skid feet instead of the wear edge. I went through 3 sets of skid feet before I figured out that they wear down a lot faster than the wear edge. This is my 5th winter. I went through 3 sets of feet in the first 2 winters and 1 side of a wear edge in the last 2 winters. I flipped my wear edge over this summer so hopefully I'll get another 2 years out of this side.

In the long run, it's cheaper to replace the wear edge every 3 or 4 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,973 Posts
Good point about it being a "wear edge"...I think it just sounds worse than it really is. I am running in float-mode with the edge-trip unlocked, so if I do hit a spot that is uneven, it should trip forward or float the edge up.

Part of it is also lack of experience. I'm in south east PA and there is some snow in the forecast this weekend, so I'll hopefully get more experiment time.
I have a very similar setup, classic 2032r and a HLA Snow loader blade. I actually don’t use float to plow. 3 major reasons, once set float lengthens my reaction time to change that “attack” angle as the handle is locked down in float, keeping it in the standard operating position I can actively fine tune my plow angle, level and vary or eliminate contact on the ear edge or shoes to push the plies back off the drive onto the lawn without damaging the soft sod. Second, I like to be able to scrape things clean (my snow seldom gets plowed before it gets driven on a couple times), this sometimes requires down pressure from the loader, in float I can’t apply down pressure. Float always seemed to hinder my steering abilities, even if MFWD, if I tried to float-the machine wanted to track straight regardless, turning was near impossible, even properly ballasted. If I skip the lock into float and manage my blade pressure, angle of attack, etc. as stated in point 1 and 2 I can plow typically in 2wd.

All of this assumes some time getting used to your setup, your areas to plow and just getting some seat time so you get that practice to develop those feelings of what’s happening, why and how to react and correct. It’ll take a couple sessions, but it’ll come.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I have a very similar setup, classic 2032r and a HLA Snow loader blade. I actually don’t use float to plow. 3 major reasons, once set float lengthens my reaction time to change that “attack” angle as the handle is locked down in float, keeping it in the standard operating position I can actively fine tune my plow angle, level and vary or eliminate contact on the ear edge or shoes to push the plies back off the drive onto the lawn without damaging the soft sod. Second, I like to be able to scrape things clean (my snow seldom gets plowed before it gets driven on a couple times), this sometimes requires down pressure from the loader, in float I can’t apply down pressure. Float always seemed to hinder my steering abilities, even if MFWD, if I tried to float-the machine wanted to track straight regardless, turning was near impossible, even properly ballasted. If I skip the lock into float and manage my blade pressure, angle of attack, etc. as stated in point 1 and 2 I can plow typically in 2wd.

All of this assumes some time getting used to your setup, your areas to plow and just getting some seat time so you get that practice to develop those feelings of what’s happening, why and how to react and correct. It’ll take a couple sessions, but it’ll come.

Every setup seems to need a bit of a customized touch. I totally get why you don't use float. I'm still experimenting with that because there are moments where the front tires are floating in the air instead of the plow! :) Some reading I've done, guys are using their independent rear brakes to help steer when the front end gets too light. I never thought of that....just one more thing to try.

For now, I think I'm going to mount the plow in the barn, on the flat concrete and see what kind of gap I'm at. Then, get some tape to mark my bucket-level rod with the plow just barely contacting the floor. Then, I'll angle the plow and verify the contact.

Another monkey wrench is when the plow is at an angle to the side. (The AF10 plow has a 15 and 30 degree position on each side which is set manually). If that angle is set, all of a sudden, the bucket (plow) roll forward or backward is EXTREMELY crucial. This is where the correct attack angle being marked on the bucket-level rod will be very important. I've thought about taking a cut-off wheel and clipping about 3/4" of the outside corners of the wear bar...just to get rid of those sharp points out on the ends. Just a thought.....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
798 Posts
I just finished plowing a half mile of driveway/shared road that is a mix of gravel and asphalt with an AF10F about 15 minutes ago. I'm measuring for and ordering a heavy conveyor belt plow edge by the end of today. No major issues, but I'm convinced that the rubber wear edge will be significantly easier to use due to the flexibility of the edge requiring fewer fine adjustments of the plow height/angle etc. All in all I'm really pleased with how it managed 6" of heavy wet snow. I'm also very glad that I've had a couple of hundred hours of seat time and many 10s of hours of loader work prior to needed to use a front mount plow, I feel that it made the learning curve far less steep than if I'd just jumped on the tractor for the first time to plow snow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I just finished plowing a half mile of driveway/shared road that is a mix of gravel and asphalt with an AF10F about 15 minutes ago. I'm measuring for and ordering a heavy conveyor belt plow edge by the end of today. No major issues, but I'm convinced that the rubber wear edge will be significantly easier to use due to the flexibility of the edge requiring fewer fine adjustments of the plow height/angle etc. All in all I'm really pleased with how it managed 6" of heavy wet snow. I'm also very glad that I've had a couple of hundred hours of seat time and many 10s of hours of loader work prior to needed to use a front mount plow, I feel that it made the learning curve far less steep than if I'd just jumped on the tractor for the first time to plow snow.
Yeah, I think a urethane or heavy rubber as you're going with is probably ideal. Keep us posted with how it goes. :thumbup1gif:

Since we have the same plow, how are you going to about mounting it? It seems most of the urethane / rubber edges require it to be sandwiched in the middle of the plow and another bar which acts as a clamp. These AF10F plows seem to have a slightly different setup. I guess some drilling may be required.

This morning, I had about 2 inches of snow. I've only got 60 hours experience on this machine and I would agree with you. I'm going through a bit of a learning curve. That said, I thoroughly enjoy what I'm doing, so I don't feel as though I've had a tough time learning. I think a lot of it is getting a good system for my driveway. Sort of like cutting grass at a new house...takes a few times cutting to find a good, efficient way to make your path. Anyway, this morning before leaving the pole barn, I set my plow edge on the concrete floor and really made sure I knew where my bucket-level rod was positioned. I think I have a good setup right now. I'm using it in float mode with just a whisker of contact to the asphalt. I achieved a nice, clean surface...easily as nice as the snowblower, which always did well. A big part of the learning is when I'm plowing up to the grass....making sure I'm ready to pull the SCV back and raise the plow at the last second so I don't peel up my turf. Doing all of this, while maintaining forward/reverse motion of the tractor and doing it all smoothly is where the real skills shine with someone much more experienced than me. But, I'm getting it! ;)

Also, some of my trouble has been expectations. I have two 90 degree turns in my drive, plus a parking area between the house and garage and patio. Plus a hard sloped area of asphalt near the house corner and parking area...its a fairly "complex" situation to plow. The reality is setting my expectations....it is virtually impossible to plow all the areas. Especially without driving over piles here or there. But, I got it done. And it only took about half an hour. Shoveling it is not gonna happen...and the snowblower probably wouldn't have worked on the 2 inches of fluffy snow. This type of snow is exactly why I wanted the plow.

I can't afford to let the snow pack down and ice up....the majority of the driveway that we use is along the tree line, which is to the south of the driveway. Therefore, it never gets sun and a chance to melt. And its a slope onto a busy road...so fairly important to keep it cleaned off.

Thanks for all the tips, folks.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
Since we have the same plow, how are you going to about mounting it? It seems most of the urethane / rubber edges require it to be sandwiched in the middle of the plow and another bar which acts as a clamp. These AF10F plows seem to have a slightly different setup. I guess some drilling may be required.

Usually that "another bar" is the steel cutting edge that comes with the blade. You just unbolt the steel cutting edge, sandwich the urethane edge in between and get some longer bolts to replace the original bolts so that you can put everything back together. You may have to drill the piece of urethane but you shouldn't have to drill your plow at all. (On the more popular plows you can find urethane/rubber cutting edges predrilled to fit.)

The picture Deere uses on their site for the AF10F shows it with the optional urethane cutting edge that Deere sells.

af10f_series_front_blades_r4g029838_rrd_1366x768_large_1e918a37bc38869b49d0b960ecdcc5a0801a4ab8.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,732 Posts
This is my first winter with a loader mounted snow plow. Mine is actually a Yanmar plow, but it's similar in concept and design to the Frontier AF11E in that it's got the hydraulic angling that your AF10F does not have. I actually bought the plow in the fall of '17, but never had enough snow last year to actually use it.

Over the summer I shelled out :gizmo: to pave 342' of my driveway. Yeah, I'm pretty protective of it! :laugh: Based on all of the threads I've read here and on "that other tractor forum", I bought a piece of "stall mat" from TSC right after I got the blade. It was a very nice accessory in the back of my truck for the better part of 12 months since I never needed to put it on the plow until this year. :laugh:

I tried to get some good pics of the rubber edge install, but my camera was acting up that day. Here are a couple though to hopefully give you the idea of how it's installed....

20190108_170520_resized.jpg

20190108_165330_resized.jpg

The rubber overhangs the actual blade by a little over an inch - top and bottom. Since the factory cutting edge hangs down below the bottom of the actual plow, there's about 2-1/4" that the bottom of the rubber could potentially fold back. I was super worried about it before I started using it. Turns out there was nothing to worry about.

THIS SETUP WORKED AWESOMELY!! Like many others have said, it's like having a squeegee on the front of the tractor!! :good2: All the way to the surface with no scratching, marring, black streaks, etc.!

20190113_143606_resized.jpg

Sully has mentioned how great the rubber edges are at not tearing up the grass. Here's a close-up of an area that I cleared so that ol' Clyde could do his business in the grass...

20190113_143721_resized.jpg

The stall mat is 48"x72". It's about $40 at Tractor Supply. I was able to cut it with a utility knife. I was also able to drill the bolt holes in it with a regular drill bit. To save yourself a trip, take out one of the cutting edge mounting bolts before you go to TSC and buy enough of the same diameter, but at least 1" longer (but not too long). I also bought new nylon-locking nuts to replace the originals. I'd cut the length of the rubber strip so that it overhangs about 2" longer than your steel cutting edge. I think your blade is 60" wide, so you should be able to do this. My blade is 72", so my ends are pretty much flush with the steel blade.

Technique wise, here's what I did for plowing the snow.... Like you and Pat, I also marked my bucket level indicator with a piece of tape before I started plowing. Turns out that was a waste of tape for me! :laugh: I simply lowered the FEL until the blade was just about to touch. Then I adjusted the "curl" on the FEL until both ends of the rubber edge were about to touch at the same time. I might have to lower/look/curl a couple of times, but it was pretty quick any time I changed the angle on the blade. Then I just sat the blade down on the surface and started plowing! I gave it a little down pressure, but not a bunch. I also didn't put it into float-mode.

Let me know if you have any questions. If I don't know the answer, I'll just make something up! :laugh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Usually that "another bar" is the steel cutting edge that comes with the blade. You just unbolt the steel cutting edge, sandwich the urethane edge in between and get some longer bolts to replace the original bolts so that you can put everything back together. You may have to drill the piece of urethane but you shouldn't have to drill your plow at all. (On the more popular plows you can find urethane/rubber cutting edges predrilled to fit.)

The picture Deere uses on their site for the AF10F shows it with the optional urethane cutting edge that Deere sells.

View attachment 667570
That optional kit for the AF10 is a several hundred dollar affair, if I recall correctly...like in the $300 to $400 range.

Here's a close-up of the standard edge and the urethane option from JD. I believe the urethane kit includes a different size clamping bar. Mine looks like the pic on the left.

edge.JPG
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top