Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My neighbor recently rolled his tractor (2025R) over moving some dirt on an incline. Unfortunately the output shaft that goes to the front driveshaft snapped off and now the shaft needs to be replaced. Wondering if anyone has replaced something similar or any has advise. Been looking around online but resources are few and far between. Thanks!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,440 Posts
Looks like its broken on the tranny side. You probably will have to split the tractor to replace it. If it is in fact broken on the axle end, just drop the axle and replace the input shaft.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Looks like its broken on the tranny side. You probably will have to split the tractor to replace it. If it is in fact broken on the axle end, just drop the axle and replace the input shaft.
This is on the trans side.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,543 Posts

·
Senior GTT Super Slacker
Joined
·
38,153 Posts
Looks like a big job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,433 Posts
So when I blew up my driveshaft on my old 2210 it also took the input shaft into the hydro static trans.

I ended up breaking the tractor in half and replacing the shaft myself. It was an ordeal because it was July in Texas and I was right in the middle of moving to North Carolina. I used the tractor for loading pallets etc onto my trailer so it wasn't like I could just load it and deal with later.

To me there are two ways to handle this:

1. Take it to the dealer. I was looking at around $3k for that between parts and labor my deal. That was a drive shaft...related parts and then the input shaft. Your repair might not be that much but I doubt you get out of the dealer for less than $1500.

2. Do it yourself, if the tractor is no longer under warranty/insurance. If your buddy is still making payments then it should be covered on the JD insurance since that is basically insurance on the tractor situation like this.

If you do it your self then I recommend:

1. Get a repair manual. Do not expect the new manual (new to me is for any model built after the 1980's) to be extremely detailed on what you need to do. It will be general in nature or at least the 2210 manual was. Read it several times. Go to JD parts.com and then also scout out what parts you need via the parts diagrams. I would get everything that is attached to that broken shaft and replace it. When I did my deal, I failed to get a bushing for the end of the engine where the driveshaft hooked up. That caused problems later since the old one was worn and I didn't know it.

2. Take your time. Unless your buddy is in a big hurry for it, I would plan on doing this over a couple of weekends. None of what you are going to do is particularly hard, it's just a PIA to get the whole transaxle out from the tractor. Then dealing with the trans case could be a real problem depending on how the shaft is installed. With my deal it went right in/out and I didn't have to get super intrusive with the gear box.

3. Take a lot of pictures as you disassemble. It will make up for the lack of pictures in the manual. The more pictures you have during the disassembly process the easier it gets to re-assemble.

4. bag and identify all your bolts etc. There are many and they are mostly different sizes.

5. Don't think you are going to cheat the system by leaving something on the tractor and working around it like a piece of cowling/seat pan etc. Just do what it takes to make access to the particular part on the tractor easier.

There is a third option and that's drag the tractor in and trade it in. Dealers will take on some repair projects like this if they think they can make money on it. You are not going to get near the trade in value you would with a working tractor but it's better than a poke in the eye...maybe.

I hope you buddy didn't get hurt during the rollover. Much easier to fix tractor than a human. Good luck. Take lots of pictures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
So when I blew up my driveshaft on my old 2210 it also took the input shaft into the hydro static trans.

I ended up breaking the tractor in half and replacing the shaft myself. It was an ordeal because it was July in Texas and I was right in the middle of moving to North Carolina. I used the tractor for loading pallets etc onto my trailer so it wasn't like I could just load it and deal with later.

To me there are two ways to handle this:

1. Take it to the dealer. I was looking at around $3k for that between parts and labor my deal. That was a drive shaft...related parts and then the input shaft. Your repair might not be that much but I doubt you get out of the dealer for less than $1500.

2. Do it yourself, if the tractor is no longer under warranty/insurance. If your buddy is still making payments then it should be covered on the JD insurance since that is basically insurance on the tractor situation like this.

If you do it your self then I recommend:

1. Get a repair manual. Do not expect the new manual (new to me is for any model built after the 1980's) to be extremely detailed on what you need to do. It will be general in nature or at least the 2210 manual was. Read it several times. Go to JD parts.com and then also scout out what parts you need via the parts diagrams. I would get everything that is attached to that broken shaft and replace it. When I did my deal, I failed to get a bushing for the end of the engine where the driveshaft hooked up. That caused problems later since the old one was worn and I didn't know it.

2. Take your time. Unless your buddy is in a big hurry for it, I would plan on doing this over a couple of weekends. None of what you are going to do is particularly hard, it's just a PIA to get the whole transaxle out from the tractor. Then dealing with the trans case could be a real problem depending on how the shaft is installed. With my deal it went right in/out and I didn't have to get super intrusive with the gear box.

3. Take a lot of pictures as you disassemble. It will make up for the lack of pictures in the manual. The more pictures you have during the disassembly process the easier it gets to re-assemble.

4. bag and identify all your bolts etc. There are many and they are mostly different sizes.

5. Don't think you are going to cheat the system by leaving something on the tractor and working around it like a piece of cowling/seat pan etc. Just do what it takes to make access to the particular part on the tractor easier.

There is a third option and that's drag the tractor in and trade it in. Dealers will take on some repair projects like this if they think they can make money on it. You are not going to get near the trade in value you would with a working tractor but it's better than a poke in the eye...maybe.

I hope you buddy didn't get hurt during the rollover. Much easier to fix tractor than a human. Good luck. Take lots of pictures.
Thanks for the advice. I stopped over at the dealership today and got some diagrams and insight from them.

Parts will be ordered Friday and plan is to tear into it next week.

Looks like I’ll have to split the tractor like you said. From there the front case has to come off the transmission, however like you said it doesn’t seem too invasive.

Luckily he didn’t get hurt when it rolled.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Senior GTT Super Slacker
Joined
·
38,153 Posts
To me there are two ways to handle this:

1. Take it to the dealer. I was looking at around $3k for that between parts and labor my deal. That was a drive shaft...related parts and then the input shaft. Your repair might not be that much but I doubt you get out of the dealer for less than $1500.

2. Do it yourself, if the tractor is no longer under warranty/insurance. If your buddy is still making payments then it should be covered on the JD insurance since that is basically insurance on the tractor situation like this.

If you do it your self then I recommend:

1. Get a repair manual. Do not expect the new manual (new to me is for any model built after the 1980's) to be extremely detailed on what you need to do. It will be general in nature or at least the 2210 manual was. Read it several times. Go to JD parts.com and then also scout out what parts you need via the parts diagrams. I would get everything that is attached to that broken shaft and replace it. When I did my deal, I failed to get a bushing for the end of the engine where the driveshaft hooked up. That caused problems later since the old one was worn and I didn't know it.

2. Take your time. Unless your buddy is in a big hurry for it, I would plan on doing this over a couple of weekends. None of what you are going to do is particularly hard, it's just a PIA to get the whole transaxle out from the tractor. Then dealing with the trans case could be a real problem depending on how the shaft is installed. With my deal it went right in/out and I didn't have to get super intrusive with the gear box.

3. Take a lot of pictures as you disassemble. It will make up for the lack of pictures in the manual. The more pictures you have during the disassembly process the easier it gets to re-assemble.

4. bag and identify all your bolts etc. There are many and they are mostly different sizes.

5. Don't think you are going to cheat the system by leaving something on the tractor and working around it like a piece of cowling/seat pan etc. Just do what it takes to make access to the particular part on the tractor easier.

There is a third option and that's drag the tractor in and trade it in. Dealers will take on some repair projects like this if they think they can make money on it. You are not going to get near the trade in value you would with a working tractor but it's better than a poke in the eye...maybe.

I hope you buddy didn't get hurt during the rollover. Much easier to fix tractor than a human. Good luck. Take lots of pictures.
:thumbup1gif: Very nice.
I'd like to repeat the "Take a lot of pictures as you disassemble" statement.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,987 Posts
:thumbup1gif: Very nice.
I'd like to repeat the "Take a lot of pictures as you disassemble" statement.
And post them here. :thumbup1gif:
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top