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Discussion Starter #1
So the way I understand it is the 220R loader can lift 1120#. Is that taking the bucket into account? In other words, I take my bucket off. I put on a 300# fork attachment. How much can I lift with it?
 

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So the way I understand it is the 220R loader can lift 1120#. Is that taking the bucket into account? In other words, I take my bucket off. I put on a 300# fork attachment. How much can I lift with it?
I believe the answer to your question is 820# (1120-300=820)

Sincerely
 

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I believe the answer to your question is 820# (1120-300=820)

Sincerely
Wouldn't it make more sense to be 1120 + bucket weight - 300? I really doubt whether the lift capacity is rated to have to include the bucket's own weight (i.e. they are giving the lift capacity of empty loader arms). Said another way, the lifting capacity with forks is changed by the net difference in weight of the forks vs. the bucket.

For the OP, you also have to take into account the distance ahead of the loader arm mount when talking about fork capacity. If my above equation held, that would apply to weight located basically at the point on the forks where the bucket's center of mass would have been. If you move the weight out further the capacity goes down as distance increases.

Rob
 

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Wouldn't it make more sense to be 1120 + bucket weight - 300? I really doubt whether the lift capacity is rated to have to include the bucket's own weight (i.e. they are giving the lift capacity of empty loader arms). Said another way, the lifting capacity with forks is changed by the net difference in weight of the forks vs. the bucket.

For the OP, you also have to take into account the distance ahead of the loader arm mount when talking about fork capacity. If my above equation held, that would apply to weight located basically at the point on the forks where the bucket's center of mass would have been. If you move the weight out further the capacity goes down as distance increases.

Rob
BigBlue,
I respectfully disagree as the JD website (https://www.deere.com/en/loaders/front-end-loaders-for-tractors/220r-loader/) describes the "Loader" lift capacity from pivot point "U". (http://manuals.deere.com/omview/OMW48833_19/OUO6038_0001575_19_15MAR02_1.htm)

I stick with my original answer.

I believe the answer to sleepy's question is 820# (1120-300=820)

I could be wrong.... :dunno:

Sincerely
 

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Wouldn't it make more sense to be 1120 + bucket weight - 300? I really doubt whether the lift capacity is rated to have to include the bucket's own weight (i.e. they are giving the lift capacity of empty loader arms). Said another way, the lifting capacity with forks is changed by the net difference in weight of the forks vs. the bucket.

For the OP, you also have to take into account the distance ahead of the loader arm mount when talking about fork capacity. If my above equation held, that would apply to weight located basically at the point on the forks where the bucket's center of mass would have been. If you move the weight out further the capacity goes down as distance increases.

Rob
Yes, they are giving you the lift capacity at the pivot, before whatever attachment you put on.
 

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Interesting. Not intuitive to me. Not saying you're wrong, just that it doesn't make a lot of sense.

How about breakout force? Where would they measure that from if there is no bucket installed? Is that simply the power of the curl ram to pull back?

Rob
 

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Yes, they are giving you the lift capacity at the pivot, before whatever attachment you put on.
That's the way I understand it also.
 

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Interesting. Not intuitive to me. Not saying you're wrong, just that it doesn't make a lot of sense.

How about breakout force? Where would they measure that from if there is no bucket installed? Is that simply the power of the curl ram to pull back?

Rob
Breakout force of bucket vs lift capacity of load arms.
 

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Anyway you slice it, JD is very modest when it comes to capabilities, from HP to lift capacity. All I know is so far anything I have tried to pick up I have picked up, from 4 x 4 round bales to a bucket of whatever to a four man hot tub.
 

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keep in mind that with forks, your capacity is very reduced. The loader manual spec sheet may have a spec for forks. my 460 manual says that my loader has 1900 +/-80 lbs. of capacity at 59". But with forks, it says that the capacity is 980 or so pounds. does your manual have this?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I understand that the further away the load, the less it can lift. But how much can I lift with the load against my backrest? May the debate continue.
 

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I understand that the further away the load, the less it can lift. But how much can I lift with the load against my backrest? May the debate continue.
As I see it, an empty fork lift attachment weighing 300lbs will allow you a generic available lift weight of 820lbs. We could really split hairs and calculate weight per inch of attachment past the U joint, but given JD's normally conservative lift ratings, I'd say 820lbs will be a fair argument.

The loader can do 1120 at the u joint, bucket weighs about 194 lbs..that's technically 926 lbs of lift capacity. Per JD, at 500mm or 19.65 inches past the u joint, the loader can handle 803lbs. At 19.65 inches from the bucket, lift capacity will be affected by what percentage of the load will truely sit at 19.65". In the case of a bucket, most of its weight will be in the first 12" or so.

With all my rambling going on, what I'm getting at is you won't get a definite number on what you can lift. I'm betting when JD tests these weights, they're using a calibrated method to simulate u joint load and then a 500mm distance from u joint load. Those numbers are a baseline and will change quickly depending on the attachment, distance from u joint, orientation of the load on the attachment etc.

If you were lifting a heavy piece of steel that would set right up against the backrest of the forklift attachment (say 1" thick) I'm betting you'd be able to lift right around 850lbs. That will obviously never happen, so with all considerations factored, your available load capacity is likely going to be more in the high 600-700 range if you're carrying a normal heavy dispersed load.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I understand that the further away the load, the less it can lift. But how much can I lift with the load against my backrest? May the debate continue.
As I see it, an empty fork lift attachment weighing 300lbs will allow you a generic available lift weight of 820lbs. We could really split hairs and calculate weight per inch of attachment past the U joint, but given JD's normally conservative lift ratings, I'd say 820lbs will be a fair argument.

The loader can do 1120 at the u joint, bucket weighs about 194 lbs..that's technically 926 lbs of lift capacity. Per JD, at 500mm or 19.65 inches past the u joint, the loader can handle 803lbs. At 19.65 inches from the bucket, lift capacity will be affected by what percentage of the load will truely sit at 19.65". In the case of a bucket, most of its weight will be in the first 12" or so.

With all my rambling going on, what I'm getting at is you won't get a definite number on what you can lift. I'm betting when JD tests these weights, they're using a calibrated method to simulate u joint load and then a 500mm distance from u joint load. Those numbers are a baseline and will change quickly depending on the attachment, distance from u joint, orientation of the load on the attachment etc.

If you were lifting a heavy piece of steel that would set right up against the backrest of the forklift attachment (say 1" thick) I'm betting you'd be able to lift right around 850lbs. That will obviously never happen, so with all considerations factored, your available load capacity is likely going to be more in the high 600-700 range if you're carrying a normal heavy dispersed load.
well you answered my question. My question basically hinged on whether or not the weight of the bucket was included in the 1120#
 

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Does the lifting capacity number assume no rear ballast weight? I realize the effect this would have on stability, but would this make any difference to capacity? Thx
 

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Does the lifting capacity number assume no rear ballast weight? I realize the effect this would have on stability, but would this make any difference to capacity? Thx
I would assume it’s based on a properly ballasted tractor, as detailed in the owners manuals.

But...they way look I at it is that for every pound the rear gets lighter while trying to lift something, that’s one pound less the loader can lift. I realize it’s not really a 1:1 ratio hopefully you get the idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Well I have some data on this. I got a bundle of rebar today. It weighed 843 lbs. per the ticket. I had to stack a couple pallets in the middle of my trailer to load it so I wouldn't hit the fenders with the forks. When I got home, I unloaded the top pallet with the rebar in the middle of the pallet, approx. 24" away from the backrest. I only had my empty imatch in the back. It lifted it fine (although my rear was light). I didn't take it up much further than necessary but I did try it to see if it would and it would so.....Now we know that it will at least lift 850# 24" out, likely more up against the backrest because when I first got a bite, it was near the end of my forks and it didn't want it.
 

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I just posted in this section about lifting my new farm King rear pto snowblower out of the bed of my truck. So here's a real example. My forks weigh 315lbs - the blower with the pto shaft installed weighs 490 and the over built pallet it was on weighs at least 75lbs. So that's 880lbs. I had to dead lift it out of my truck bed from a height of approx 3ft. I just barely got it up from that height. Keep in mind though that the blower was sitting length wise on the pallet so much of the weight was drastically out front. Once I had it on the ground and then had to lift it back up to 1 or 2 feet to drive it back to my shop. The loader had no problem doing it. Based on the speed of the lift when I picked it back up from the ground I think I might be able to add another 100lbs to the load and still get it up to a usable foot or two high. If so. That would be the tippy top max that I think it could handle. So let's call it really close to 1000lbs of real world lift including the weight of the implement attached. Maybe I'm wrong and it could handle another 200lbs for a total close to 1100. But based on what I just did. I think there's an approximate usable max of 700lbs of lift avail with forks and probably 850 to 900lbs using the bucket.
 

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Does the lifting capacity number assume no rear ballast weight? I realize the effect this would have on stability, but would this make any difference to capacity? Thx
It’s also worth noting that proper ballast is also crucial for proper weight distribution between front/rear axles.


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Keep in mind that most ratings are taken at the pins and to full height. Some have ratings for different heights and how far out front the weight is. Lots of variables that are simply unrealistic to list them all out.

My 75 HP tractor is rated to lift 3900lbs at the pins to full height of 131". I picked up 6300lbs 23" and no more. I know for sure that it was 23" because it was 1" off the bed of a 22" deck height trailer and the trailer was empty once I lifted the weight.

So a perfect example of being able to lift far more than the rating, but no where as high.
 
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