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Hello everybody. Ive been using my 2210 since it was new, always serviced and wisely used.

The transmission has been getting hot enough to trip the warning light, I think I registered 250º last time.

I replaced the fluid with low vis, new filter and cleaned suction screen/magnets. It still overheats. My belly mower is spinning freely, rotary cutter for the rear spins freely.

What makes the transmission get too hot? 950hrs on the machine and the only problem Ive ever had was the driveshaft going bad, I replaced it before it broke and my cooling fan is intact.

I have searched an awful lot on this and I cant find any likely issues that makes the transmission overheat.

Thanks,
 

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I don't see your location in your profile. What is the ambient temperature outside and how long have you been mowing when you get the over temp warning?

Is the transmission housing and surrounding area free of debris? I don't think the 2210 has a cooling fan on the transaxle.
 

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Hello everybody. Ive been using my 2210 since it was new, always serviced and wisely used.

The transmission has been getting hot enough to trip the warning light, I think I registered 250º last time.

I replaced the fluid with low vis, new filter and cleaned suction screen/magnets. It still overheats. My belly mower is spinning freely, rotary cutter for the rear spins freely.

What makes the transmission get too hot? 950hrs on the machine and the only problem Ive ever had was the driveshaft going bad, I replaced it before it broke and my cooling fan is intact.

I have searched an awful lot on this and I cant find any likely issues that makes the transmission overheat.

Thanks,
Having had a 2210 some years back - I just don’t remember it having a high trans temp warning light let alone a gauge.
 

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Blades on fan missing/broken?
 

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It sure does:
Thanks Kenny! I thought it did but browsed through the parts but couldn't find it. That would be my first suspect.
 

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Having had a 2210 some years back - I just don’t remember it having a high trans temp warning light let alone a gauge.
Looking at the manual the only thing mentioned is a engine coolant temperature light.

E - Engine Coolant Temperature Light - This light will turn on when the engine coolant is approaching a dangerously hot temperature. If this light turns on during operation, remove load on machine immediately. Reduce engine to idle speed and check for something blocking air flow to the radiator and check engine coolant level. If light stays on after cleaning grille, stop engine.
 

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Just an idea, but this sure sounds to me like that feedback rod issue that can happen where the 3-pt is constantly up against resistance and gets the fluid hot. I'm sure one of the more knowledgeable gurus around here can chime in with more details. Is it making any kind of constant whining noise like it's up against a load?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I don't see your location in your profile. What is the ambient temperature outside and how long have you been mowing when you get the over temp warning?

Is the transmission housing and surrounding area free of debris? I don't think the 2210 has a cooling fan on the transaxle.
I’m in upstate SC, yes, its generally hot outside in the summer. Let’s say I’m mowing in the 86º-92º range. Ive been doing the same for over 10 years now, never been a problem until now. I can mow maybe 1.5hrs, grass/field isn’t all that dense or tall. I only mow as much as the mower deck can blow out the side chute, I don’t let it clog itself up.

I keep the transaxle free of debris, all surfaces are pretty clean.

Plastic fan blades are all there and I inspect the area regularly. In fact, when the high temp light comes on I turn off the PTO and let the engine run at the 540PTO rpm mark for a few minutes and it cools things down enough for me to continue mowing.

Is there any chance that the mid pto drive has worn linkage internally?

Is there any chance that the transaxle is just worn out and makes itself too hot as I drive around in L?

Thanks for the help.

I think Ive read somewhere that if I were to buy a new SCUT then all my implements I currently have will not connect to the rear pto. Would my rotary cutter and 48” tiller not hook up to the rear of the new tractors?
 

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I think Ive read somewhere that if I were to buy a new SCUT then all my implements I currently have will not connect to the rear pto. Would my rotary cutter and 48” tiller not hook up to the rear of the new tractors?
I'm a bit stumped on the overheating problem.

As for rear implements, your 2210 has the same Cat-1 3PH and 540RPM rear PTO as do newer tractors. Without know the specifics on your existing implements, I can think of no reason why they would not work on a current model SCUT. Your tractor has roughly the same engine and PTO horsepower as a 1025R.
 

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I’m in upstate SC, yes, its generally hot outside in the summer. Let’s say I’m mowing in the 86º-92º range. Ive been doing the same for over 10 years now, never been a problem until now. I can mow maybe 1.5hrs, grass/field isn’t all that dense or tall. I only mow as much as the mower deck can blow out the side chute, I don’t let it clog itself up.

I keep the transaxle free of debris, all surfaces are pretty clean.

Plastic fan blades are all there and I inspect the area regularly. In fact, when the high temp light comes on I turn off the PTO and let the engine run at the 540PTO rpm mark for a few minutes and it cools things down enough for me to continue mowing.

Is there any chance that the mid pto drive has worn linkage internally?

Is there any chance that the transaxle is just worn out and makes itself too hot as I drive around in L?

Thanks for the help.

I think Ive read somewhere that if I were to buy a new SCUT then all my implements I currently have will not connect to the rear pto. Would my rotary cutter and 48” tiller not hook up to the rear of the new tractors?
Hey!

I'm just down the road from you just outside of Belton. Sorry to hear you are having a transaxle problem. I just finished dealing with a overhaul of my transaxle. Not a fun thing. I'm sorry I can't help you with an answer to your problem. But I am interested in why you asked about your attachments working with a new tractor. Are you considering selling your current tractor? I have a large frame utility tractor, model 855 & just at 30 years old. My tranny blew up not too long ago. A lot of money & grief to get it repaired. All I can say is that if the rest of your tractor is in good shape, you may want to repair as needed. I would not invest in any of those new SCUT'S. They offer a lot of SIZZLE, but no Steak as far as I'm concerned.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Looking at the manual the only thing mentioned is a engine coolant temperature light.

E - Engine Coolant Temperature Light - This light will turn on when the engine coolant is approaching a dangerously hot temperature. If this light turns on during operation, remove load on machine immediately. Reduce engine to idle speed and check for something blocking air flow to the radiator and check engine coolant level. If light stays on after cleaning grille, stop engine.
Well, maybe I’m just being dumb about this whole thing? My tractor is at a friends house right now so I cant look at the dash. There is a warning light on the bottom of the display and its definitely possible that its for engine coolant?

Does your manual show each warning light? In my mind i cant quite recall them, there is a battery light, engine oil pressure light, and one more.?
 

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Well, maybe I’m just being dumb about this whole thing? My tractor is at a friends house right now so I cant look at the dash. There is a warning light on the bottom of the display and its definitely possible that its for engine coolant?

Does your manual show each warning light? In my mind i cant quite recall them, there is a battery light, engine oil pressure light, and one more.?
Yes, here you go...
 

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A worn PTO clutch will dramatically increase the Transmission Temps and one of the ways to determine if its the PTO clutch is to run the machine with the PTO engaged but don't move the tractor. Make sure the screens are all clear and that the oil cooler and radiator are clean. On machines which use the lower portion of the radiator as the hydraulic fluid cooler, the slipping PTO clutch will increase the hydro oil temp so much that it causes the engine coolant temp to substantially rise. After all, its harder to cool hydraulic fluid in the limited size and space of either the oil cooler or the portion of the radiator which is dedicated to cooling the hydro oil.

If you start the tractor and engage either the MMM or the rear mower and simply sit in one location for a few minutes, if the PTO clutch is slipping and generating heat, it will drive up the hydro oil temp from the dramatic increase in friction inside the rear end assembly. It won't take long. Also, at 950 hours of use, the PTO clutch could be seriously worn.

Another way you can tell the PTO clutch is slipping is when you are mowing thick or tall grass, the PTO clutch will slip and the mower output will decline, usually slowing down the mower blades and also permitting the thick grass or weeds to reduce the mower speed while NOT bogging down the engine. Why? Because the clutch is slipping and instead of the load being transferred back to the tractors engine, its instead lost in the load at the clutch itself.

Chances are if you changed the hydro fluid, it would be full of debris from the wearing of the clutch material. That material can also restrict fluid flow through the filter which can cause additional heat because of the constriction in the filter.

Take a infrared temp gun and point it at the radiator, point it at the hydraulic filter and measure the radiant heat at different places of the system. Chances are, you will see the section of the radiator which cools the hydraulic oil much hotter than the portion of the radiator which cools engine coolant. The hydraulic fluid being so hot drives up the coolant temp. Check the actual engine temp against the hydro housing temp and chances are, the hydro housing is generating more heat than the engine is. When you get all of that hydro oil hot, its hard to cool down with just the flowing through the cooler or radiator.

I don't have a 2210, but it appears that the radiator does have steel hydro oil lines running to the bottom of the radiator. I didn't see a separate oil cooler for the transmission on or near the radiator, like is used on the 1025r and other tractors. The cooling fan on the back of the main driveshaft from the engine to the hydro pump is just blowing air at the hydro assembly, not pulling air through a oil cooler as does the engine cooling fan through the main radiator.

When the hydro system is working as it should, the hydraulic oil doesn't dominate the radiator and in fact, is much cooler than the engine coolant. But when the PTO clutch is slipping, the heat transfer is enormous and really can change things......

I think the PTO clutch is slipping and needs to be rebuilt with a new clutch pack and a hydro fluid flush and change. Please note, if the PTO clutch is worn out, the media in the fluid can clog the lower portion of the radiator or the dedicated oil cooler. Its wise to flush those out with specialized transmission cooler cleaning products, which are pressurized and help to flush out the oil cooler lines as well as the portion of the radiaitor which cools the hydro fluid. The clutch media is very fine and you don't want it to pullute the new hydro oil when you change it after the clutch rebuild.

Here is the PTO clutch parts illustration. You order the entire clutch pack kit, which is LVA801016, which appears to be about $170.

John Deere Parts Catalog

Depending upon the access, it can be a job which is difficult for someone who is not a skilled mechanic and has the tools and experience. On some of the units, you can get to the PTO clutch assembly through the rear cover of the rear end. Others require a removal of the rear operator platform and ROPS and others to get to the clutch. I am sure the Technical Service Manual outlines whats necessary.

I usually use a product like this to flush the cooling lines and oil cooler, after the PTO clutch is rebuilt.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/TCI-882001-Transmission-Flush-High-Pressure-Trans-Cooler-Cleaner-Flush/51559572?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=0&adid=22222222227043001255&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=107243261237&wl4=pla-298704986477&wl5=9017350&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=8175035&wl11=online&wl12=51559572&veh=sem&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI-qKY3MH74wIVBNvACh0x2w6xEAQYAyABEgKUVvD_BwE
 

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I should also clarify that the PTO clutch debris from a worn clutch in the Hydro assembly is like dust within the hydro fluid. Often, if the fluid has been overheated, it will be darker in color than the new fluid. Some of the darkness comes from the amount of the worn clutch material sediment in the fluid itself. Much the way that an automatic transmission fluid looks when the bands are worn in the vehicles automatic transmission.

Also, much like an automatic transmission with a lot of band wear, servicing the fluid and replacing the old fluid with clean new fluid can actually make the clutch SLIP MORE, because the new fluid is lacking the clutch debris which actually helps prevent some of the slippage.

So if the overheating problem seems worse than it was before you changed the hydro fluid, its possibly not your imagination as the clean fluid actually will make the PTO clutch slip more, because the fluid doesn't have the material in it the old fluid had.

Several times people have said "How can the PTO clutch slipping increase the engine coolant temp?" The answer is because of the heat which the hydro fluid emits prevents the radiator from cooling properly and the hot hydro oil increases the radiator coolant temps, which reflects in the engine coolant gauge on the dash.

There is a very direct correlation between increased engine coolant temps and a slipping PTO clutch in machines which share the radiator for cooling the engine coolant and the hydro oil. If the radiator has steel lines coming into it in either the lower portion of the radiator or towards the bottom of each of the side cooling tanks on the radiator, its because the radiaitor is serving two purposes of cooling the engine coolant in the upper portion of the radiator and the hydro oil with the lower portion of the radiator.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Yes, here you go...
So yeah, this happened. I’m an idiot. I assumed that temp warning was for hydraulics.

Now i need to see about a water pump and flushing out the radiator. I have never touched anything under the hood in something like 13 years. Just fluid changes, filter changes, battery.

I did lose the charging relay for the battery a few years ago but I discovered I could just swap the glow plug relay over to the charge relay, and its all good in my warm climate.

Thanks everybody for the help. Not the best “first post” kind of thing in a forum, but in the end y’all helped me get straightened out.
 

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There are a few threads about overheating on your particular model on other forums.
Seems the radiater tends to clog easily. Ones I read about earlier were aluminum and Not cleanable.
This may have changed.....Theres just not many radiater shops left. At one time every small town had one, they became victims of the enviromental squad.
See if its clogged externally between the fins ( shine a light from the back).
The weatherstripping on the sides may play a part in proper air flow...is yours gone.
Is the belt tight? Collapsed hoses and thermostat are on the list of other things to check.
Have the cap tested or pick up a new one.

A external hydro fluid cooler would have to help.....just a poor design the way it is.
 

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So yeah, this happened. I’m an idiot. I assumed that temp warning was for hydraulics.

Now i need to see about a water pump and flushing out the radiator. I have never touched anything under the hood in something like 13 years. Just fluid changes, filter changes, battery.

I did lose the charging relay for the battery a few years ago but I discovered I could just swap the glow plug relay over to the charge relay, and its all good in my warm climate.

Thanks everybody for the help. Not the best “first post” kind of thing in a forum, but in the end y’all helped me get straightened out.
Glad you got it figured out that it is the engine getting hot and not the transmission.

These little diesels require a coolant change every so often.

At this point I would get the supplies needed and dump the coolant, flush the system, and replace the coolant. Also inspect the hoses and water pump carefully. I would strongly recommend you use the Deere coolant specified for your tractor. Diesels use a different coolant than gas engines.


These tractors will collect a lot of debris in the radiators. While at it you need to do a good inspection/cleaning. Be careful if using compressed air as you can easily damage the fins. Start out with a low pressure and work up until you are getting the effect you need without damaging anything. And yes, it's tight in there.

An air nozzle like in the pic is about the only way to get in there properly -

LEMATEC-Air-Blow-Gun-For-Compressors-1ft-Rubber-Tip-Nozzle-Compressed-Air-Gun-Clean-Handy-Pneuma.jpg

If you can't find anything visibly wrong you may be OK with the coolant change/flush and cleaning. Wouldn't hurt to throw a new thermostat in while you are at it. Your cooling system needs some much needed overdue maintenance.
 

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So yeah, this happened. I’m an idiot. I assumed that temp warning was for hydraulics.

Now i need to see about a water pump and flushing out the radiator. I have never touched anything under the hood in something like 13 years. Just fluid changes, filter changes, battery.

I did lose the charging relay for the battery a few years ago but I discovered I could just swap the glow plug relay over to the charge relay, and its all good in my warm climate.

Thanks everybody for the help. Not the best “first post” kind of thing in a forum, but in the end y’all helped me get straightened out.
No worries friend.... we've all been there. Glad we could assist in some way. Hopefully a radiator clean, flush and coolant swap will put you back into cool running. :)
 

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As others have mentioned, possible radiator blockage , from what I can remember no secondary screen infront of the radiator.

With air compressor blow air from rear of radiator to front of the tractor. Make sure no pin point amount of air or you can put holes in your radiator.

if no air compressor , take garden hose and spray water from back of radiator toward the front.

One more thought, since 2210 has cooling fan. With engine turned off, climb under your tractor and try spinning the cooling fan.. I know you said it will cool down with attachment turned off. If fan spins any amount the bracket holding the fan to the driveshaft needs to be replaced.
When I had a 2305 my cooling fan turned easily .

My guess is the radiator needs cleaned if it hasn't been done for a while.

Of course while under the hood , check your antifreeze level .
 
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