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There was no lock-tite on those bolts, and the bolt heads are not drilled for safety wire. No wonder they came loose.

I just checked the 1025R Technical Manual to see if JD indicates whether the ring gear attaching bolts are supposed to have thread locker applied to the attaching bolts. They do indicate to apply thread locker.

Hopefully they did when they initially installed them. :dunno:

I personally believe cap-screws that are used in these types of applications should be safety-wire bolts, but I guess they are just too expensive and take too much time to install!!!

https://www.mcmaster.com/safety-wire-bolts
Reminds me of 45 years ago when I was a safety-wire plier machine. We used those on virtually all bolts working on reciprocating and turbine aircraft. They do their job well. I know that in aircraft they can be life or death issues vs riding a JD 2305 tractor are different. That said, I'd spend the few extra bucks and apply those to help mitigate potential bills of $1,500 plus.

YMMV

OP: You've done a fantastic job of helping others here on GTT :yahoo:
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Reminds me of 45 years ago when I was a safety-wire plier machine. We used those on virtually all bolts working on reciprocating and turbine aircraft. They do their job well. I know that in aircraft they can be life or death issues vs riding a JD 2305 tractor are different. That said, I'd spend the few extra bucks and apply those to help mitigate potential bills of $1,500 plus.

YMMV

OP: You've done a fantastic job of helping others here on GTT :yahoo:
We use lots of safety-wire in the big reciprocating compressors at work too. At 3000 horsepower and 5000 psi hydrogen, you don't really want anything coming apart. I seriously considered drilling and wiring these bolts. Don't have a lot of room to use a heavy head and don't want to drill too near the shank. Probably settle for some thread locker as the manual calls for. Got some high strength loctite along with primer, and it's pretty tough. Think it requires 400 degrees to break it loose. The bolts pass all the way through the gear, there's probably room behind I could use slightly longer bolt and locktite on a jam nut too. Hate to go re-engineering, obviously thread locker worked for most of these tractors, at least in those where it was used.

Thanks! when I was looking for pics of the guts of this thing, there wasn't a lot to find. Figured if anybody else ever needed them again they might feel they hit the jackpot when they run across this thread. Eventually bought a manual but didn't have one when I was trying to figure out what happened. I can learn a ton just looking at a pic rather than the step by step of a manual.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Well, made a deal to buy the tractor, got into it for what they offered him trade in, seemed pretty reasonable. He already owed me some money so that benefits us both. Sent my parts order in last weekend during Green farm parts sale, now just waiting for the parts to arrive. Hoped they'd ship pretty quick but still have no tracking info yet. Local dealer said my parts list would just be a stock order and should only take a couple days but I ordered online trying to save a buck.

Reconsidered on the differential carrier. Had my machinist cut about .005 off the gear side and that left a nice flat mating surface for the gear to bolt up. Cleaned up the other side at about .004. He coated the surfaces with dykem before turning it, the red that's left behind is the low spots. The gear side has one tiny spot left, the side with the bolt heads he cut til it was at least flat around all the bolts. It cleaned up pretty well. After test fitting with the new bolts I think it will be fine. Plan to use some bearing mount between the mating surfaces and high strength loctite on the bolts. I will also be keeping a much closer watch on those bolts and fluid condition. The replacement bolts have 19mm heads instead of 17mm so they cover a little more surface. The important thing is that everything still runs very true and surfaces are flat. Really only a couple holes that are ugly all the way through. Even using all brand new parts the gear would still have slop in the bolt holes.
 

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Have you considered using any material such as JB Weld to fill in the slop in the gear bolt holes. With the larger bolt heads and Locktite, filling the holes should help, I've done this with success in the past.
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Have you considered using any material such as JB Weld to fill in the slop in the gear bolt holes. With the larger bolt heads and Locktite, filling the holes should help, I've done this with success in the past.
No I hadn't but it might not hurt.

Even in new condition the holes are 13mm and the bolts only 12mm, so obviously they allowed and expected some slop in the fit. Really only have two holes that got enlarged all the way through to the gear side, and even then it's pretty minor. Amazing how much better everything looked after cutting only .005 off. We contemplated making some bushings for at least a couple holes, but they'd have to be pretty thin, difficult to make and maybe install.

The bearing mount bonds strong and there's quite a bit of surface area between the gear and carrier. Think I'll try to clock the gear against the bolts in the forward direction as I torque it down. My plan is to mate the gear with the bearing mount applied, and then torque all the bolts in a star pattern, then remove the bolts one at a time to apply primer and loctite, then re-torque as I go just to be extra sure I get clean surfaces and good coverage with both primer and loctite. Don't know if the thin layer of bearing mount compound will help but don't think it will hurt. It can sure make a slip fit bearing a lot tougher to remove.
 

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Iamrfixit,

I was going to ask you if you do this type of work as a side job or if this is your primary occupation but then I saw where you mentioned something about the compressors at the shop where you work so that question was answered. These tractor repairs must be something you work on at home on your own. You certainly have the insight to share the details of such a project.

Personally, I think I would go into the rock shaft control valve with that level of filings in the screen. I would also pull the pump apart and check the inner pump impeller and housing to make sure there is no damage. Also, some of the tractors are known to develop a leak between the assembly and housing which usually originates from the gasket, from my experience, which is number 26 in the following parts illustration.

John Deere Parts Catalog

Also, check the swash plate bushing and seal because of the wear which can cause a weeping leak. I had one which the swash plate bushing from all of the directional change was worn enough to warrant replacement. Same with the front (mid pto ) shaft seal. Since you are in there and have it that far apart, it makes sense to prevent future issues from cropping up......

I also removed the last rear end assembly with a floor jack which was dicey at best, trying to keep it balanced. I put it back in with a Motorcycle lift, the type which lifts the bike under the center section with the parallel frame rails on the jack. Being able to jack the entire assembly up slowly into position sure made the process simpler. Also, since I could balance the assembly better, I decided to install the axles and the housings onto the assembly when I had it on the bench. Originally, I had pulled the axles off to make the unit easier for me to lift manually up to the work table. Since I was going down with the repaired and complete assembly on the motorcycle lift, the axles provided the balance to make setting it down by myself easier.

I don't know what the entire assembly weighs, but as you know, its fairly heavy, especially for one person to pick up and set on the table......

Looks like you have yourself a tractor......Are you going to keep it or get it repaired and sell it?

Nice job on the wiring loom repair. Amazing what some consider a repair verses what we would consider a proper repair.......why do you think they used the PVC tubing, to protect the wiring after repair? Unique way to house the wire.............

I also want to thank you for doing a great job on the covering of this entire matter. You have done a wonderful job with the explanations, the photos the answering of questions and the explanation you have given and the entire project documentation. You have made the entire thread as valuable as possible and an important reference for others. Thank you for doing a great job covering this important topic. It's threads like this which really add value to the GTT site to share such important details. Great job....

We are looking forward to the reassembly of your new machine. Thank you for sharing with the GTT family. :bigthumb:
 
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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
Iamrfixit,

I was going to ask you if you do this type of work as a side job or if this is your primary occupation but then I saw where you mentioned something about the compressors at the shop where you work so that question was answered. These tractor repairs must be something you work on at home on your own. You certainly have the insight to share the details of such a project.

Personally, I think I would go into the rock shaft control valve with that level of filings in the screen. I would also pull the pump apart and check the inner pump impeller and housing to make sure there is no damage. Also, some of the tractors are known to develop a leak between the assembly and housing which usually originates from the gasket, from my experience, which is number 26 in the following parts illustration.

John Deere Parts Catalog

Also, check the swash plate bushing and seal because of the wear which can cause a weeping leak. I had one which the swash plate bushing from all of the directional change was worn enough to warrant replacement. Same with the front (mid pto ) shaft seal. Since you are in there and have it that far apart, it makes sense to prevent future issues from cropping up......

I also removed the last rear end assembly with a floor jack which was dicey at best, trying to keep it balanced. I put it back in with a Motorcycle lift, the type which lifts the bike under the center section with the parallel frame rails on the jack. Being able to jack the entire assembly up slowly into position sure made the process simpler. Also, since I could balance the assembly better, I decided to install the axles and the housings onto the assembly when I had it on the bench. Originally, I had pulled the axles off to make the unit easier for me to lift manually up to the work table. Since I was going down with the repaired and complete assembly on the motorcycle lift, the axles provided the balance to make setting it down by myself easier.

I don't know what the entire assembly weighs, but as you know, its fairly heavy, especially for one person to pick up and set on the table......

Looks like you have yourself a tractor......Are you going to keep it or get it repaired and sell it?

Nice job on the wiring loom repair. Amazing what some consider a repair verses what we would consider a proper repair.......why do you think they used the PVC tubing, to protect the wiring after repair? Unique way to house the wire.............

I also want to thank you for doing a great job on the covering of this entire matter. You have done a wonderful job with the explanations, the photos the answering of questions and the explanation you have given and the entire project documentation. You have made the entire thread as valuable as possible and an important reference for others. Thank you for doing a great job covering this important topic. It's threads like this which really add value to the GTT site to share such important details. Great job....

We are looking forward to the reassembly of your new machine. Thank you for sharing with the GTT family. :bigthumb:
Thanks for the kind words!

Yes, mostly just do this kind of stuff on the side. I have a really well equipped home shop, I've bought so many tools and so much equipment I hardly have room to work in it anymore. Way too many hobbies in one small shop. I do a lot of car/truck work along with welding repairs and fabrication. I also have a full blown woodworking shop going on in there. Whether wrenching, metal or wood, I enjoy using and owning pro grade equipment and I have a bunch of it. I'm just as often found building something out of wood. Have built furniture, cabinets, sheds, garages, even houses along with tons of remodeling, plumbing and electrical work for myself and others. My landscaper friend always seems to have something for me to do on his trucks, equipment, rental houses or his own home. He also offers a "handyman" service which usually consists of me doing most of his handy work.

My day job is managing a maintenance dept at a chemical plant. My crew and I maintain the large valves and piping, numerous pumps, and several screw and reciprocating compressors. Also some conveyors and packaging equipment in another area of the plant. I've worked as a lead operator at the plant since 1986, about 5 years ago I was promoted to manager of the maintenance dept. Still trying to get completely out of operations, it's proven very difficult to train a replacement.

Going to look at the hydraulic pump, it obviously had filings getting through it. I haven't seen any sign of filings past the screen on the divider valve. The layer that had built up in the banjo bolt and on the screen almost certainly worked to filter even finer particles. The hydraulic drive unit is pretty easy to remove if I had to go into it later, but I may have a look and replace the gasket at least. I've ordered a couple of the other seals as well. Even with a significant amount of aluminum filings in the gearbox there is not much sign of wear. Everything looks really good and the magnets in the screen had almost nothing stuck on them.

I do plan to have the tractor for a while so I want it right. I might trade up later on. Pretty much anything I have is for sale if the right deal comes along. I don't really have a huge need for it but what the heck, got lots of stuff I probably don't need, always depends on who you ask, LOL. I can go get my landscaper friends 1025 or skidsteer pretty much any time I'd need it. My best friend has an even bigger skidsteer along with a mini excavator, telehandler and tractor/loader. Both have big dump trailers, so I can get my hands on equipment if I need it.

I've used a motorcycle jack to drop a heavy gas tank or two over the years but don't own one anymore. The "workbench' I've been using on this project is actually my motorcycle "handy lift" table with the front tire vise removed. I tried to avoid digging my engine hoist out of the shed, but there was just no way. That transaxle unit is too darn heavy and very top heavy, the engine hoist and lift table makes handing it a piece of cake, I'm sure getting it put back in place will be almost simple using the hoist.

Kinda figure if I have any further problems, I know the way back in. That's a lot of the reason I decided to just re-use the differential carrier. I'm pretty certain it will work just fine, a new replacement is $700, that money is better spent elsewhere. I'm not afraid of tearing back into it if I had too, (not saying that I want to!) Wasn't real sure I wanted to tear into it at all in the beginning, but I've gotten pretty familiar with the guts of it now. Only took 4 hours to have it out of the tractor and on the table with the side off, that was without a manual and having never done it. Think I could almost cut that in half knowing how everything comes apart.
 

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Thanks for the kind words!

Yes, mostly just do this kind of stuff on the side. I have a really well equipped home shop, I've bought so many tools and so much equipment I hardly have room to work in it anymore. Way too many hobbies in one small shop. I do a lot of car/truck work along with welding repairs and fabrication. I also have a full blown woodworking shop going on in there. Whether wrenching, metal or wood, I enjoy using and owning pro grade equipment and I have a bunch of it. I'm just as often found building something out of wood. Have built furniture, cabinets, sheds, garages, even houses along with tons of remodeling, plumbing and electrical work for myself and others. My landscaper friend always seems to have something for me to do on his trucks, equipment, rental houses or his own home. He also offers a "handyman" service which usually consists of me doing most of his handy work.

My day job is managing a maintenance dept at a chemical plant. My crew and I maintain the large valves and piping, numerous pumps, and several screw and reciprocating compressors. Also some conveyors and packaging equipment in another area of the plant. I've worked as a lead operator at the plant since 1986, about 5 years ago I was promoted to manager of the maintenance dept. Still trying to get completely out of operations, it's proven very difficult to train a replacement.

Going to look at the hydraulic pump, it obviously had filings getting through it. I haven't seen any sign of filings past the screen on the divider valve. The layer that had built up in the banjo bolt and on the screen almost certainly worked to filter even finer particles. The hydraulic drive unit is pretty easy to remove if I had to go into it later, but I may have a look and replace the gasket at least. I've ordered a couple of the other seals as well. Even with a significant amount of aluminum filings in the gearbox there is not much sign of wear. Everything looks really good and the magnets in the screen had almost nothing stuck on them.

I do plan to have the tractor for a while so I want it right. I might trade up later on. Pretty much anything I have is for sale if the right deal comes along. I don't really have a huge need for it but what the heck, got lots of stuff I probably don't need, always depends on who you ask, LOL. I can go get my landscaper friends 1025 or skidsteer pretty much any time I'd need it. My best friend has an even bigger skidsteer along with a mini excavator, telehandler and tractor/loader. Both have big dump trailers, so I can get my hands on equipment if I need it.

I've used a motorcycle jack to drop a heavy gas tank or two over the years but don't own one anymore. The "workbench' I've been using on this project is actually my motorcycle "handy lift" table with the front tire vise removed. I tried to avoid digging my engine hoist out of the shed, but there was just no way. That transaxle unit is too darn heavy and very top heavy, the engine hoist and lift table makes handing it a piece of cake, I'm sure getting it put back in place will be almost simple using the hoist.

Kinda figure if I have any further problems, I know the way back in. That's a lot of the reason I decided to just re-use the differential carrier. I'm pretty certain it will work just fine, a new replacement is $700, that money is better spent elsewhere. I'm not afraid of tearing back into it if I had too, (not saying that I want to!) Wasn't real sure I wanted to tear into it at all in the beginning, but I've gotten pretty familiar with the guts of it now. Only took 4 hours to have it out of the tractor and on the table with the side off, that was without a manual and having never done it. Think I could almost cut that in half knowing how everything comes apart.
Definitely, each time you go into one of these, the next one is much faster knowing what to go after and unbolt and what doesn't need to be taken off as a piece and instead, pulling the entire component. Like you said, it's not like you want to get into these units, but when you have to, having done it before makes it go so much quicker.

I first rebuilt the rear assembly in my 455. I have aluminum folding tables from my drag race trailer and I set those up in the garage and put down surgical cloths I get from a doctor friend and spread everything out. I took a lot of photo's the first time and when I got into the control valves and hydro pump and other pieces with springs, ball valves and what seemed like a million little pieces, the parts diagrams were very helpful in putting them back together in the right order.

The first time I got the first rear assembly back in the tractor and ready to "test" I was actually nervous for a second to push the hydro pedals when I had the unit up on jack stands to see if the wheels would turn and everything work and no runs, drips and errors. I did find I had to adjust what I would call the "neutral bias" of the swash plate to get the proper movement and response and the JD Technical Service manual was very helpful for that process. Otherwise, it went fairly smooth. My neighbor, who is an engineer, came over one day when I had the entire assembly torn down and I was cleaning parts and inspecting them and he said "Oh wow, do you think you will be able to put all of this back together?" Of course, I shrugged like "No big deal" but with three tables of parts spread out, I have to admit the thought crossed my mind as well...........

In the end, I ended up doing three more of these rebuilds so far. An older couple in town had a bad leak on their hydro on the same model tractor and he took it to my friend who owns the small engine repair shop. He was so booked out, it was at least a month before he could get to their tractor so he called me to see if I wanted to do another as they needed it back ASAP. So that was number 2 and then 2 others also followed. Once word gets around about who repairs these things, its amazing how people seem to find you........:laugh::lol:

One thing I found very interesting is the dealer which I deal with has 16 other stores and when I would be considering the wear on parts or wondering what I would find inside of the units before I would get into them, I made a list of the most common parts replaced and then also had the parts guy look up other parts to see how often they have been ordered or sold in their 17 dealerships. The actual number of real hard parts, like gears or internal bearings which had EVER been ordered through any of these dealerships was very, very low. In fact, in a couple of cases, parts had been ordered in by the service tech thinking they would need them and when they got inside the cases, it was always the same items being replaced. Various seals, gaskets and very, very few hard parts like the actual gears or the carrier assembly, etc. Even axles had never been ordered which surprised me, but they are very heavy duty and well made, but the axle bearings and seals had been sold a hand full of times over the years which made sense.

I found checking the parts department to see how often something had ever been sold usually was quite accurate in what I would need as rarely was there anything wrong with any of the gears or the carrier or other "hard parts". I would bet there hasn't been a differential carrier sold for many of those tractors as if they can survive the bolt failure as you found, not much else could tear one up..........

Thanks for the follow up and for providing the "back story" about you and your repair hobbies and activities. I would bet finding and training your replacement at the plant would be a very big challenge. There just aren't that many people who have vast repair knowledge and experience and its getting harder to find people who actually want to work and learn to be able to handle so many different tasks and responsibilities. I keep telling many young people that the future for everyone isn't necessarily working in "technology" as there will always be a need for many of the trades of today.

Many young people take such things as turning the thermostat up or down, turning on the lights, flushing the toilet and many other "mundane tasks" as something that just happens. But when those basic necessities don't work, life gets real chaotic in a hurry......Many younger people think the only economic and employment opportunities are in exciting new technology. Such an attitude is creating real opportunities for those who can and will work on traditional industries as those aren't disappearing, just those who are willing to work in the fields seems to be the real shortage.

Looking forward to seeing the process of your tractor going back together and what your next project might be..............
 
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Discussion Starter · #49 · (Edited)
I placed the parts order almost 2 weeks ago and it still shows as "processing". I finally get a response to numerous requests for status update, the side cover is backordered, wonder how long that will delay me. I'd really like to get my shop space back!
 

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Anyone have any insight on Greenfarmparts.com?

I placed the parts order almost 2 weeks ago and it still shows as "processing". I've called and emailed, went through the chat feature, as well as asked a question on the order status page, I can't even get a response. All I get is an answering machine when I call and no response to any other method. About to call my credit card and report fraud. My local dealer said they could have the parts in 2 days, the small savings is not worth the wait. I was beginning to get frustrated yesterday, I started calling first thing this morning and I'm well past mad on my way to going nuclear now.
This seems to happen with them from time to time for some reason.

They are a subsidiary of Reynolds Farm Equipment. Give them a call and see if they can put you with GFP people - some have had success this way. Info in this link.

Fishers, IN - Corporate Site
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
A box of parts arrived at my house on Monday and I finally got started with reassembly today. Realized I forgot to order a rear cover gasket and PTO valve gasket so got those ordered right away. The differential, pinion shaft and diff lock fork all have to go in together, took a little bit but it went together. Then got the PTO brake piston inserted and lined up with the brake shoe. Installed the pinion drive and range selector shafts and torqued on the front case. Once that was done I could install the PTO brake springs and tighten that up, along with the range selector detent ball and spring. Everything seemed to work as it should so installed the hydraulic pump and hydro drive motor. Then cleaned up and bolted on the axle housings. Pretty much stalled until I get the gaskets.

This afternoon I was cleaning up and discovered one of the alignment pins had stuck in the old cover. With numerous studs along with the other pin I just didn't notice. Was able to pull the axle housing, loosen the cover and get the pin installed with minimal effort. Only problem is now that the whole front case assembled, I can no longer see that the PTO brake piston correctly engaged in the shoe. Pretty sure it's fine but another thing to worry about. Probably take an hour and a half to pull the pump, hydro motor and front case all apart and put it back together again just for a quick look, but that's the only way to see. I'll sleep on it, maybe remove the PTO brake piston again, measure the depth, just take another look at it.

Took a bunch of pics during assembly, then run a borescope up behind the gear to see how well I could see the bolts. You could easily see the bolt heads but you'd need to rotate the differential to see all of them.

I bench tested the high strength loctite on a 1/2 bolt and it's very stout stuff. I cleaned the bolt with brakleen, then applied primer, loctite and threaded the nut about halfway on by hand. Next day I put a 3/4 " wrench on and leaned into it, the bolt turned just slightly then locked up. I pulled about as hard as I could and it would not budge further.
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Here's the borescope video and a still pic. It's just a cheap $35 camera from amazon, seems to work pretty well. I didn't spend much time on it because the battery was about dead and so was my phone but you can get the idea. This was through the suction screen hole and up behind the differential gear.


 

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I wondered how you were coming on this project. I always just order my parts through my local dealer. The small savings online isn't worth it to me and my dealer will match their (GFP) prices anyway. Plus my dealer often gets parts the next day and sometimes, even later the same day if its in one of their other stores.

You sure have the case and all the parts cleaned up very nicely, you must have a parts washer tank in your shop at home.

You have done a wonderful job documenting this incident and also verifying details such as the ability to inspect the bull gear and the bolts with the inspection scope, which will be very helpful for anyone concerned about their machine.

Looking forward to watching you get this machine back into running condition. Thanks again for taking the time and answering questions and doing an outstanding job documenting the process.
 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
I wondered how you were coming on this project. I always just order my parts through my local dealer. The small savings online isn't worth it to me and my dealer will match their (GFP) prices anyway. Plus my dealer often gets parts the next day and sometimes, even later the same day if its in one of their other stores.

You sure have the case and all the parts cleaned up very nicely, you must have a parts washer tank in your shop at home.

You have done a wonderful job documenting this incident and also verifying details such as the ability to inspect the bull gear and the bolts with the inspection scope, which will be very helpful for anyone concerned about their machine.

Looking forward to watching you get this machine back into running condition. Thanks again for taking the time and answering questions and doing an outstanding job documenting the process.
Saved about $90 plus the sales tax on a $900 order, went ahead and got a filter pack and a 5 gal bucket of hygard along with the parts. The cover was the biggest problem, as it was backordered with no release date. They found one in Canada and had to change status of the order to "emergency machine down" in order to get it shipped down here. No shipping and no additional freight charge on the order though! I don't mind a few days to save $160 but 2+ weeks is another thing. To do it again I'd probably just order the parts locally. As I was reassembling I was feeling very aware how long this thing has been apart.

Tried hard to keep all the tractor parts organized but stuff gets moved around and other jobs keep coming. Had to replace F350 ball joints in the garage at home and did some steering column bearings in the driveway. Only a few blocks but it's a pain to run between places trying to get all the tools I need. Even for a job I've done many times, hard to remember everything. Speaking of ordering parts, I ordered the ball joint set from Amazon, I've been doing a lot of that lately. The local Oreilly store was $325 for four ball joints, $134 on amazon for the same Moog brand and identical part numbers! Often saving 50%+ over local parts. Struts, shocks, suspension parts, hub assemblies, lots of stuff has really big markups. Just ordered both door lock actuators for my truck, name brand for less than one generic actuator cost over the parts counter.

I do have a parts washer, clean all the removable stuff in it along with using up most of a case of brakleen to clean out the heavy assembly. Thankfully I'd just found a couple cases of CRC on sale for $2.50 a can. Can also get it by the gallon and use it in a pressurized spray can, that works out to about the same as sale price. The local NAPA store is about $6+ for 19oz can but sells the gallon for $30, near sale price without all the cans to discard.
 

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Speaking of ordering parts, I ordered the ball joint set from Amazon, I've been doing a lot of that lately. The local Oreilly store was $325 for four ball joints, $134 on amazon for the same Moog brand and identical part numbers! Often saving 50%+ over local parts. Struts, shocks, suspension parts, hub assemblies, lots of stuff has really big markups. Just ordered both door lock actuators for my truck, name brand for less than one generic actuator cost over the parts counter.
I hate to admit it, but I have been doing the same thing with Amazon. First off, it's easy (too easy, which is why my order volumes keep growing with them) and in many cases, I have my Amazon parts in 1 day, but always by 2 days. We must be geographically close to a major shipping warehouse of Amazon's as I have ordered items just as a Prime member and had them the next day by 11am, without any special freight or shipping indicated. They aren't always the least expensive, but it pays to check. Sometimes, they are much cheaper not having to pay the shipping costs.

The other thing I have found handy is while Amazon has all of the various sources of products listed in many of their product listings, it pays to check the source directly. For example, there are work shirts I like to wear and I usually order them 6 or 8 at a time. They are the moisture wicking shirts and I like the really bright "Safety Yellow" or "Optic Orange" colors. Amazon had them at $14.95 per shirt and I checked directly with the supplier to Amazon and was able to buy them for $10.95 each if I ordered 6 at a time and no shipping. They function just like the "Under Armor" clothes for a fraction of the price......:good2:

My local dealer has been very good about matching prices for me on parts, etc. with online sources. While they can't do anything about the sales tax, they do run a fluid and filter sale in February and August of each year and I am able to get the 5 gallon buckets of Low Vis hydro fluid for about $45 and they have filters at 15% to 20% off their normal price. I usually stock up on the filters and fluid then.

Also, strangely, it's often cheaper to purchase the individual filters from Deere than to buy the filter packs, which contain the same items......:dunno:, so just be aware of that anomaly.......It's easier to order the filters in a pack, but last time I checked though my dealer, the filter packs were $3.00 each more than buying the individual filters.

Looking forward to seeing your project go back together. Thanks again for doing such a great job with the descriptions and photos and really making the thread a valuable resource for others. :good2:
 
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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
I hate to admit it, but I have been doing the same thing with Amazon. First off, it's easy (too easy, which is why my order volumes keep growing with them) and in many cases, I have my Amazon parts in 1 day, but always by 2 days. We must be geographically close to a major shipping warehouse of Amazon's as I have ordered items just as a Prime member and had them the next day by 11am, without any special freight or shipping indicated. They aren't always the least expensive, but it pays to check. Sometimes, they are much cheaper not having to pay the shipping costs.
Yup, always pays to check around. I usually do but sometimes just order from them anyway because it's so convenient. The other day I needed a couple smaller roll pin punches so ran to the Napa store. $12 for two and I often don't know for sure the exact size I need so thought it'd really be nice to just have a complete set, they wanted $175 for a Wilde brand, usa made set. Thought about it further, well maybe I don't need a set.

On the computer later I remembered and searched around, didn't find them on amazon although they had other brands. But I know the Wilde quality has been pretty decent. Ebay was the winner, $55 for the same 12pc set from a reputable seller. Two days later it was in my toolbox.

I usually just buy NAPA gold filters for everything, but they apparently can't cross the hydraulic filter. That one filter is like $30 alone so the $60 filter pack didn't seem too out of line, haven't priced each filter individually for this machine though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Got my missing gasket on Thursday, spent about 20 minutes getting the rear cover on. Since I was using the hoist to lift it, I also attached the hitch/rops support onto the transaxle, then hung the assembly on the frame of the tractor. The engine hoist made it a piece of cake, the whole process of getting it in place an hooking it up took maybe a half hour. I connected up the hydraulic lines, brake, forward/reverse and wiring. Found the power steering return line had a tiny screen crimped in the banjo bolt. The screen was starting to come loose so called it a day and ordered a new bolt first thing Friday morning. Paid freight to get the bolt Saturday morning and installed it. Added the hygard but got called out so I didn't get much done.

Late this morning I fired it up, topped it off, checked for leaks and tested it out. The 3 point lifted and lowered and forward and reverse motion worked fine. I installed the footboard, brake pedal and forward/reverse pedals. Then came the fender deck, Hi/Lo lever, Fwd lever, Pto lever, diff lock lever and seat. Then bolted on the Rops and hooked up the lights. Have some issue with the flashers but the work lights all work fine. The flashers used to work but one of the lights was busted off and hanging by the wires when it came to the shop. I've tested all my new wiring and it's all fine. It's a fuse, diode or flasher issue just haven't narrowed it down yet. Probably shorted something when he smashed the light off, he said he hit a gooseneck trailer with it. Don't really need them but they're on there so I like to have them working. I'll get it found but not a priority right now. Took it for a spin, then loaded it on my trailer and went to pickup the loader and tiller.

Having done it, I'm sure I could drive it in the shop and have the transaxle on the bench in an hour. Took me about 3.5 hours the last time but I had to figure out how everything came apart. As I was reassembling things I kept feeling like I was forgetting something because it went so quickly. Had no parts left over and everything seems to work other than the flashers. Hopefully I'll never need to take it apart again.
 

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Posted on a similar thread but thought I'd start my own and add a few pics. The tractor is a 2008 and belongs to a friend who's a landscaper. Just rolled over 600 hours when the differential came apart and lost rear drive. All ten bolts worked loose, broke off or fell out of the bull gear. When that happens the wheels are completely loose and freewheel. The tractor has only a pinion brake so you have no brakes at all. Luckily he was using front wheel assist along with the tiller and loader or it could have been much worse. He was landscaping a yard at a new house on the edge of a long steep hill.

He bought the tractor in 2016 with 180 hours on it. I serviced the transmission and found some aluminum filings so cleaned it up and changed the oil. After 8-10 hours I drained the oil again, checked the screen and found no filings. Don't know if he had any service done since then, I haven't had it in my shop. He said he had been noticing some noise when he'd road the tractor between jobs, but seemed fine when in the dirt or under load. I found all ten bolts in the bottom of the case, all of them are bent and have the threads chewed up. One bolt was broken off in the gear but I was able to screw the piece out with my fingers, no locktite at all on any of the bolts. The case has some minor damage and the differential carrier has the holes egged out. The side cover is destroyed. The bull gear has some marks on the top edge of the teeth but it will clean up with a file. Have most of the cleanup done just waiting on all the parts to come in.
Posted on a similar thread but thought I'd start my own and add a few pics. The tractor is a 2008 and belongs to a friend who's a landscaper. Just rolled over 600 hours when the differential came apart and lost rear drive. All ten bolts worked loose, broke off or fell out of the bull gear. When that happens the wheels are completely loose and freewheel. The tractor has only a pinion brake so you have no brakes at all. Luckily he was using front wheel assist along with the tiller and loader or it could have been much worse. He was landscaping a yard at a new house on the edge of a long steep hill.

He bought the tractor in 2016 with 180 hours on it. I serviced the transmission and found some aluminum filings so cleaned it up and changed the oil. After 8-10 hours I drained the oil again, checked the screen and found no filings. Don't know if he had any service done since then, I haven't had it in my shop. He said he had been noticing some noise when he'd road the tractor between jobs, but seemed fine when in the dirt or under load. I found all ten bolts in the bottom of the case, all of them are bent and have the threads chewed up. One bolt was broken off in the gear but I was able to screw the piece out with my fingers, no locktite at all on any of the bolts. The case has some minor damage and the differential carrier has the holes egged out. The side cover is destroyed. The bull gear has some marks on the top edge of the teeth but it will clean up with a file. Have most of the cleanup done just waiting on all the parts to come in.
Hi
My 2305 has an issue where the rear wheels will move the tractor on flat ground when there is no resistance. As soon as I add resistance say push bucket loader into pile of dirt the rear wheels just stop turning but you can here the motor trying to turn them. If I engage the rear Differential lock the left side rear wheel will spin and dig like it should but right side still nothing. In four wheel drive front wheels work fine. Is this problem related to the problem you had?
Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 · (Edited)
Hi
My 2305 has an issue where the rear wheels will move the tractor on flat ground when there is no resistance. As soon as I add resistance say push bucket loader into pile of dirt the rear wheels just stop turning but you can here the motor trying to turn them. If I engage the rear Differential lock the left side rear wheel will spin and dig like it should but right side still nothing. In four wheel drive front wheels work fine. Is this problem related to the problem you had?
Thanks
No, if you had this problem the rear tires would only free wheel, they won't drive the tractor at all because the main gear is completely detached. I would pull the right side axle assembly or the rear cover first, sounds like you may have a broken axle shaft, maybe a problem with the axle splines or the spider gears inside the differential would be my first thought.

It's been a while but I swear I pulled the right side axle assembly off while the transmission was still in the tractor. I was still trying to confirm the bolts had fell out of the gear. You can kinda get a look at the spider gears inside the differential carrier if you remove the rear cover, see attached pic.

Since the left wheel will grab and dig with the diff lock engaged, almost has to be something to do with the spider gears or right side axle. If the spider gears are the problem then the transmission would have to come out. Getting the differential carrier out of the transmission to work on it requires some major disassembly. Think a broken axle would be pretty obvious as the inner end of the axle would no longer be supported in the differential. I'm thinking broken spider gear, probably one of the gears marked O or P in the diagram.

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No, if you had this problem the rear tires would only free wheel, they won't drive the tractor at all because the main gear is completely detached. I would pull the right side axle assembly or the rear cover first, sounds like you may have a broken axle shaft, maybe a problem with the axle splines or the spider gears inside the differential would be my first thought.

It's been a while but I swear I pulled the right side axle assembly off while the transmission was still in the tractor. I was still trying to confirm the bolts had fell out of the gear. You can kinda get a look at the spider gears inside the differential carrier if you remove the rear cover, see attached pic.

Since the left wheel will grab and dig with the diff lock engaged, almost has to be something to do with the spider gears or right side axle. If the spider gears are the problem then the transmission would have to come out. Getting the differential carrier out of the transmission to work on it requires some major disassembly. Think a broken axle would be pretty obvious as the inner end of the axle would no longer be supported in the differential. I'm thinking broken spider gear, probably one of the gears marked O or P in the diagram.

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Well I feel silly! Called my local dealer and explained the symptoms and the guy said he had same problem before and that I should check tire pressure because the wheel may be spinning inside the tire under load. Sure enough that was it! Simple fix. Thanks for responding, of course now I am worried if I could have bolts coming loose in the future! Thanks again
 
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