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my 42" forks arrived this last week and I had the perfect job for them. I trimmed my pine trees and had a big pile, I picked them up in one load! could have never done that with my 24" forks which I got with the attachment. Project number 2 today was to remove a large bush from the front yard, I thought I would give the 42" forks a run at popping the bush, I worked for 45 minutes trying to get the roots to pop. I finally put my 24" forks on and was done in 10 minutes. I'm sure you all know this but the curling power was 10x better with the shorter forks.

I guess this supports the idea of "the right tool for the job" :bigthumb:

Nick
 

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Right tool for the job is right - great example of that.

I took the compromise route by getting the 36". Chris was great in explaining the benefits of the different fork lengths, but I can't easily be changing forks.

Thanks for sharing your experience and pics!
 

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Right tool for the job is right - great example of that.

I took the compromise route by getting the 36". Chris was great in explaining the benefits of the different fork lengths, but I can't easily be changing forks.

Thanks for sharing your experience and pics!

You have a good point with the 36" forks, I guess i am at the point of no return! I am almost tempted to buy another attachment for the 42" forks, they are not fun to change.
 

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The fork tines are heavy.

I'd go 42" because that's what pallets are on the narrow dimension. 48"s end up poking holes in things on the other side (not good).
 

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I have a set of 42's so far all good. Yes I can see the advantage of the shorter forks.
Buy the why how did you see driving your tractor with that big bush in front of you. Did you have a spotter.:laugh:
 
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They are heavy, and they don't slide very easily.
X10 !!

I have the 4" tines and they are very heavy and very difficult to slide and remove.
 

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What makes the fork length change problematic?
It's a personal thing with me - having RA (Rhematoid Arthritis) I can't lift much of anything anymore.

I don't want anyone to think that the forks are hard to change - in fact Chris's design makes them very easy to change out. It's just me......
 
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I had to take a grinder to mine. They didn't fit at all when I got them. I do put them at about a 45° angle when I switch them out. (and use the hammer)
Angle up, down, wiggle, waggle, grind, hammer, curse. I've tried everything.
 
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I've found that just a slight angle downward works the best for me. Too much of a downward angle (45°) makes the forks hang up too much in the upper track.
 
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I had to take a grinder to mine. They didn't fit at all when I got them. I do put them at about a 45° angle when I switch them out. (and use the hammer)
Angle up, down, wiggle, waggle, grind, hammer, curse. I've tried everything.
WOW...I thought they all slid as easy as mine.
 

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Mine were an anomaly. Chris said that he'd never seen Cascade forks not fit.
Make that TWO anomalies as my Cascade forks don't fit either. I have a set of the Artillian 24" forks and they slide back and forth effortlessly. Meanwhile the Cascade forks need to be beat into position with a mallet. The bad part is when I need to adjust them and a mallet isn't nearby.

I may end up buying a new set of 3" forks and putting the Cascade's on Craigslist (or the scrap pile) as they are just too much of a PITA.

The only reason I still have them this long is I don't often need to change the spacing or swap tines. But because they are so difficult to work with I need a VERY VERY big job before going to the blood, sweat and tears of swapping to my 24" forks.

Funny thing, my dad was a lift truck mechanic for 30+ years and has seen every type of fork imaginable. He said any time they had sticky forks usually a quick touch with the grinder would cure the issue. So far grinding as not loosened up my Cascades.
 

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Make that TWO anomalies as my Cascade forks don't fit either. I have a set of the Artillian 24" forks and they slide back and forth effortlessly. Meanwhile the Cascade forks need to be beat into position with a mallet. The bad part is when I need to adjust them and a mallet isn't nearby.

I may end up buying a new set of 3" forks and putting the Cascade's on Craigslist (or the scrap pile) as they are just too much of a PITA.

The only reason I still have them this long is I don't often need to change the spacing or swap tines. But because they are so difficult to work with I need a VERY VERY big job before going to the blood, sweat and tears of swapping to my 24" forks.

Funny thing, my dad was a lift truck mechanic for 30+ years and has seen every type of fork imaginable. He said any time they had sticky forks usually a quick touch with the grinder would cure the issue. So far grinding as not loosened up my Cascades.
Yup, mine stink too, but I don't swap them that much. I need to get after them with the grinder again. They are quite the pain.
 
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