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I have a 1987 240 garden tractor. When I got it the brakes basically didn't do anything when you stepped on the pedal. I took the brake apart, cleaned everything up, found no adjusters in the system. The shoes were easily 1/4th"+ (1/8" on either side) smaller than the drum. Still lots of shoe left, though, guessing 50%. I ended up putting a shim under the fixed end of the shoe, which helped a lot going forward, but still nothing in reverse. The parking brake seems to work OK (not great) either direction. So what do the brakes need? Do they ever work any better than this? Do I just need another shim (or two) under the fixed end of the shoes? Shims in the linkage (tighten the spring up)? Break down and spend a lot of money with JD and get new shoe kit? (Don''t really have a lot of money, so this is the last, desperate option.) Seems I read of someone who JB Welded some aluminum to his old shoes with good results, but I can't find where I read that, might have been another forum. But I have room to do that if that seems to be a popular opinion. My property is on a steep hill, and it would really be nice to be able to stop on the steepest section to do some work or pick up branches or something. Or stop when grading the driveway before backing into the ditch.

The other question I have is what is the maximum weight I can add to the front, rear and/or total for traction and stability? The front is rather light and I frequently lose steering traction in gravel or dirt or (esp) snow. I have loaded all four tires with w/w fluid/water mix, which helped a bit, but especially when I have the rear blade on I have trouble. I have a home-built sleeve hitch on the back, operated with a winch, that weighs 50 or 60 pounds, tucked in pretty close to the rear axle, and in the works is a front bumper/guard/light mount that will help with the weight in front, but if I still need more; how much can I carry without breaking something? I have a 48" snow plow I need to get mounted up front, and I'm sure I'll need something or I'll get pushed all over, but when the blade is raised I don't want to over load things. When I get a few dollars saved up I'd like to put some V-61 5 rib tires on, which should improve things over the awful round profiled mini ribbed things I have now, but I'll still need some kind of weight, I think.

And while I'm thinking of it, what glue will stick to the plastic hood on these tractors? JB Weld, other epoxy of some sort? I've heard original Gorilla Glue works on *some* hoods, don't know about mine.

Thank you for your time and attention. I'll get back with results, progress on projects (with pictures, if I can get them online), and I'm sure more questions. But I'm a rather slow person, so be patient with me, please. :) (Should I have broken this into 3 threads, do you think?)
 

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I moved this to the regular L&G forum. Only those listed in the description for the Vintage L&G forum are discussed there.

Your 240 can't be a 1987, since the first one came out in 1988 and was made till 1994.

Now for your questions. On the brakes, there is an adjustment that can be made. I'm attaching the page to this post that deals with the adjustment.

On front weight, most of these you could get a front weight bracket to attach suitcase weights. I'm not that familiar with the 240, but it may be an options. Tires are also critical to steering. Tri-rib tires will steer better on loose dirt, gravel, etc. Also, you may be able to put front wheel weights on. That may be an option.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I moved this to the regular L&G forum. Only those listed in the description for the Vintage L&G forum are discussed there.

Your 240 can't be a 1987, since the first one came out in 1988 and was made till 1994.

Now for your questions. On the brakes, there is an adjustment that can be made. I'm attaching the page to this post that deals with the adjustment.

On front weight, most of these you could get a front weight bracket to attach suitcase weights. I'm not that familiar with the 240, but it may be an options. Tires are also critical to steering. Tri-rib tires will steer better on loose dirt, gravel, etc. Also, you may be able to put front wheel weights on. That may be an option.
Thank you for your quick response.

I thought I had seen a similar response about the proper forum in the past, but couldn't remember for sure, so I asked in the "Forum Help" forum, and the consensus there was to put it in the "Vintage" forum. Perhaps the description could be changed to "All Others" rather than "Post 1992" to avoid confusion in the future. Tractordata.com says the 240 was produced form 1987 to 1992. I forget how I figured mine was an '87, possibly from the data sticker number (Product Identification Number *M00240A476133* 240 TRACTOR-38) and a post in this or maybe another forum that referenced the number (maybe the "A"). I realize I could easily be wrong. It would be nice to find out for sure.

The page you posted would have been helpful, but it doesn't match the tractor I have. Per the diagram on JDParts.com the page you posted shows the last part of the linkage as key 1B. My tractor matches key 1A, with just a hole and cotter pin, no adjuster. Does the manual show any way of adjusting this, short of spending 100+ dollars I don't have for new shoes? I suppose I could try bending key 1A further, but that's pretty imprecise, not to mention hard to reverse.

As to the weight, my question was less "how to" than "how much". Even a wild guess from knowledge of similar tractors would be helpful. I have no idea if 50 pounds in the front would be too much (I doubt it) or if it would support 400 pounds with no problem. I *think* I've seen a rear weight capacity of 450 pounds some where, but no figures for the front. An opinion (or guess) from someone who *might* know would be much better than working from my ignorance. Of course a figure from a manual would be best. I just don't want to break anything.

The tires (like getting my own manual from JD) is waiting for the money. I was afraid of compaction problems with tri-ribs, and it sounded like the V-61s might be a good compromise, but I have time to reconsider. Maybe the front weights would make a big enough difference. I know the present tires might as well be slicks.
 

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Tractor data has proven, at least to me, to be an unreliable source. We have charts with years and serial number breakdowns here at GTT. 240s were built to 1994, not 1992. Your serial number makes it a 1988, which was the first year. In 1987 Deere was still making the older 200 series, the 210, 212, 214, and 216 tractors. Again, tractordata isn't a reliable source.

http://www.greentractortalk.com/for...ctors-model-numbers-years-serial-numbers.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Tractor data has proven, at least to me, to be an unreliable source. We have charts with years and serial number breakdowns here at GTT. 240s were built to 1994, not 1992. Your serial number makes it a 1988, which was the first year. In 1987 Deere was still making the older 200 series, the 210, 212, 214, and 216 tractors. Again, tractordata isn't a reliable source.

http://www.greentractortalk.com/for...ctors-model-numbers-years-serial-numbers.html
Thank you for clarifying the year for me.
 

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sleepybozo - Did you ever find a 'fix' for your non-adjustable brakes? I have same setup and would like to have brakes this year for a change. I know this is a 3yr old thread, but I haven't found this answer anywhere, and you seemed to be capable of fashioning a solution.
 
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