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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a new 2 month old 270B backhoe and I already bent the 1" diameter piston while digging.
http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/medium-frame-compact-utility-tractors-mcut/121082-2038r-270b-backhoe-how-does-happen.html
I would say that I did not do anything unusual with the hoe to cause this, and I would also say that the hoe should not be susceptible to this kind of damage. Thankfully the JD warranty covered the piston, so I am receiving a replacement any day now.

My question is, can I get a heavier piston (say 1.25" diameter) to replace the OEM piston? I would like to prevent this type of damage in the future.

Thanks, Sincerely
 

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:munch:

Soon to be new backhoe owner, so I am going to follow this closely.

I know these machines are not full construction grade so I want to make sure that I use it within its limits.....

Your previous post sent shivers down my spine!

Sometimes we have to break something to learn something..... and sometimes you can learn something without breaking yours.


My novice first thought to your question was if the cylinder is upgraded, what would be the next fail point?
 

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Not that this helps the issue at hand....

When I bought my 2520 I did look at the backhoe. At the time I was an equipment operator running backhoes and excavators at work. When I looked at the little backhoe I was turned off right away - it looked like a toy to me.

But with that said, I have seen how many folks do lots of work with them. But as with anything with these little compacts, a certain amount of care or an easy touch is warranted I think. Just like with the loader, you can just go ramming into stuff as things will get bent easily.

A little finesse with the controls goes a long way.
 

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:munch:

Soon to be new backhoe owner, so I am going to follow this closely.

I know these machines are not full construction grade so I want to make sure that I use it within its limits.....

Your previous post sent shivers down my spine!

Sometimes we have to break something to learn something..... and sometimes you can learn something without breaking yours.


My novice first thought to your question was if the cylinder is upgraded, what would be the next fail point?
I've been using these small BH's since 1988. I've yet to have an issue and have dug out some damn big stumps.
IMO, This is either a design flaw or a manufacturing defect. :dunno: I've read of a few of these but I would not call it a common occurrence.
 

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I have a new 2 month old 270B backhoe and I already bent the 1" diameter piston while digging.
Not a piston. It's a rod. No. 2 is the piston. No. 5 is the rod.

This has happened to other here. I don't know if they've found the cause. :dunno:


 

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If you somehow managed to get a larger diameter rod with the matching cylinder cap and seal and wiper, as an added bonus you would have faster retract speed although less retract pressure due to the loss in fluid surface area on the rod side.

If you were determined to beef up the weak point then MAYBE a hydraulic shop can identify rod stock to retrofit to your cylinder that is the same diameter but has been made of an alloy that has been hardened and tempered to a higher tensile strength before plating than the oem shaft.
There are PROBABLY a variety of pre finished cylinder shaft materials already available that can be cut and fitted to an application.

IF such a better rod material is found to be available then it should be duck soup for a proper shop to retrofit your cylinder.
 

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Hiya,

I've seen rods on all size cylinders get bent. Sometimes it's a design flaw, sometimes it's tolerance stack, sometimes it's operator error and sometimes it's a combination of all three. Looking at the picture in the other post 2 things I notice:

1) There is a scrape on the dipper stick along the same plane as the bend in the rod suggesting that either something may have contacted the rod then the dipper stick or they hit something in operation, giving the extended and loaded cylinder the nudge it needed to exceed the yield point of the rod.

2) The rod shows wear just before the inner radius of the bend. This may be the result of lens distortion or chrome plating separating from the rod because of the bend but it may indicate a less than spec straightness of the rod prior to the failure.

One thing to keep in mind is that cylinders are their weakest when fully extended, encountering a load and no cylinder rod is perfectly straight. All it takes is a slight side load if the components are maxed out.

Dipper stick close up.JPG
 

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Just saw this thread. Was thinking that I wanted the new 2038R w/ the 'improved' 270B..... Maybe I'll stop worrying about how much better a 2038R and 270B would be and just enjoy the fact that my machine takes a beating despite it's flaws here and there ;)
 

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Just saw this thread. Was thinking that I wanted the new 2038R w/ the 'improved' 270B..... Maybe I'll stop worrying about how much better a 2038R and 270B would be and just enjoy the fact that my machine takes a beating despite it's flaws here and there ;)
Sometimes it's not "Greener" on the other side of the fence! :lol:
 

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Sometimes it's not "Greener" on the other side of the fence! :lol:
With most equipment these days it doesn't seem to be a case of greener as much as it is weighing the strengths and weaknesses. It seems that each new model (and previous models) has things that are improvements and perhaps things that are a PITA. The challenge is finding a balance.
 
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