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Can anybody give me some information and opinion on purchasing a tandem disk vs. a offset disk. Pros, cons, brand, etc. Thanks!


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What tractor are you going to use it with???? Kind of important.....

Dave
 

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I'm going to use it on my soon to arrive JD 4052R. I was looking at the 8' models.


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Pretty much any 8ft 3pt tandem disk will work just fine. With an 8ft disk, I do not see any need or any offset. I am using an 8ft Dearborn 3pt disk with my 4066R and it works fine. In loose ground, I had to kick in 4wd. For reference, I weighed my disk and it weighs 700 lbs.

Dave
 

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Official "Groovie" Dude
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Can anybody give me some information and opinion on purchasing a tandem disk vs. a offset disk. Pros, cons, brand, etc. Thanks!


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What are you going to use the disk for? Breaking ground or finishing a plowed field?
 

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What are you going to use the disk for? Breaking ground or finishing a plowed field?
Either way, you will want some 70 pound weights to hang on it to get extra disking power, IME.
 

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What are you going to use the disk for? Breaking ground or finishing a plowed field?
I'll be breaking ground and preparing it for eventual planned pasture. Ground is currently natural weeds, brush, and rocks.


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Either way, you will want some 70 pound weights to hang on it to get extra disking power, IME.
Johnh123, your right, disk weight is king and I think even more so on 3pt disks verses pull types.

To add to disk weight some other things that make a disk effective are, disk diameter, number of disks, disk spacing, how concave the disks are, angle of the gangs, and travel speed to name a few. All factors to consider based the soil type it's going to be used on.
 

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I'll be breaking ground and preparing it for eventual planned pasture. Ground is currently natural weeds, brush, and rocks.


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Sounds like you may need to mow it with a brush hog first, then plow it before running the disk over it. Treat it just like you would any other seed bed. Sure, the disk will eventually work the ground up, but it will take many passes. After disking it, you may need to run a harrow over it.

Dave
 
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Chisel or ripper

Sounds like you may need to mow it with a brush hog first, then plow it before running the disk over it. Treat it just like you would any other seed bed. Sure, the disk will eventually work the ground up, but it will take many passes. After disking it, you may need to run a harrow over it.

Dave
If it's a heavy sod, plowing is going to be really tough. Usually the sod only makes about a 90 degree turn as it comes off the moldboard and then just sticks up in the air like a ribbon on edge. Then you are left with the choice of letting it sit until nature smooths it out some or enduring a really brutal first disking. I would see if some local farmer could run a chisel plow over it or just have it sprayed and then no-till into the sod. Many local Soil and Water Conservation districts rent no till drills by the day at fairly modest cost.

We have some hay land that's not in good shape. We will either 1) use a combination of 2,4,d and Roundup to kill what's there and use a no till drill to plant back what we want, or 2) spray as above and use a chisel plow, disk and then plant. We probably will do some of each as the middle of the field is ok but the edges are rough where loggers ran equipment. The chisel/disc will be used on the edges and we will just no till the middle. It's a round to it project as it's just a small field and other things keep getting bumped ahead of it.

Treefarmer
 
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What ddinham and treefarmer suggested is the best approach for the land you have and what you want to do.
 

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What ddinham and treefarmer suggested is the best approach for the land you have and what you want to do.
The last year Dad farmed I got every field that was going to be corn or beans fall plowed before the ground froze....except for 3-4 acres where all the hog houses, feeders, & water tanks were sitting. After the ground froze a little I went out and pried everything loose and hooked to the hog equipment skid, a 20 ft long sled 6 feet wide made from 4x6 timbers with 2x8 top boards. Much better than our old 16 ft sled. With a little work I could haul seven houses per load compared to 4 on the old sled. I got all the hog equipment moved to an out-of-the-way location and was done with fall field work. The next spring I disked up that 3-4 acres with our Kewanee 12 ft disk with 20" rippled blades. I made 4-5 passes over the bare packed ground and worked up a nice seedbed but only about 4-5 inches deep. I could have plowed and disked the ground quicker and had a better deeper seedbed.

Next-door neighbor tried to replace the moldboard plow on his 160 acres with a smaller lighter Kewanee disk than ours and almost we bankrupt doing it.

Disk just by itself is not the best tillage tool.
 

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The last year Dad farmed I got every field that was going to be corn or beans fall plowed before the ground froze....except for 3-4 acres where all the hog houses, feeders, & water tanks were sitting. After the ground froze a little I went out and pried everything loose and hooked to the hog equipment skid, a 20 ft long sled 6 feet wide made from 4x6 timbers with 2x8 top boards. Much better than our old 16 ft sled. With a little work I could haul seven houses per load compared to 4 on the old sled. I got all the hog equipment moved to an out-of-the-way location and was done with fall field work. The next spring I disked up that 3-4 acres with our Kewanee 12 ft disk with 20" rippled blades. I made 4-5 passes over the bare packed ground and worked up a nice seedbed but only about 4-5 inches deep. I could have plowed and disked the ground quicker and had a better deeper seedbed.

Next-door neighbor tried to replace the moldboard plow on his 160 acres with a smaller lighter Kewanee disk than ours and almost we bankrupt doing it.

Disk just by itself is not the best tillage tool.
This one works just fine at 980lbs per disk, but the OP will need a bigger tractor.
 

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