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Discussion Starter #1
I was over at a friend's house today when he was hooking up his brush cutter to his new to him 5045E tractor. I looked at his lift links and suggested he change the position of the pin and retainer ( # 3 and # 15 in the diagram)
I explained turning these parts would allow the brush cutter to raise up if the cutter hit something like a rock or stump with either the side skids or the stump jumper which could prevent damage.
His pin and retainer were in the horizontal position which locks them into place while turning the pin and retainer to the vertical position allows the 3 PT. arm to move up to take pressure off the cutter when hitting something.
We removed the quick lock pin, tapped the link pin back slightly and turned the retainer. After tapping the link pin back into place we installed retainer and the quick lock pin and he was all set.
I know when my new 5065E was delivered the parts were in the horizontal position and that was one of the first things I changed when I got my tractor home.
This is just a reminder if someone hasn't checked theirs.
Lynn
 

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Here's the drawing from JD parts you linked
liftlinks.PNG
 
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Thank you. Did it not come up when you clicked onto the link?
Lynn
It did, but posting the picture is easier, than having to wait for link to load.
 
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This is one of the advantages of JD over other makes that have a different design or only on one side. Those devices allow the ends of the lower two of the 3 point hitch to float indepently. The rock shaft and hence the lift links and draft links can go up regardless of how the items in this discussion are positioned.
 

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This is just a reminder if someone hasn't checked theirs.
Someone mentioned this in another thread regarding a 4 series tractor and it got me wondering.....

Yep, I have the same connection on my 3R.
747743


Thanks letmgrow - I learned something new about my tractor!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Honestly I don't see any need to make the links solid. There is no down pressure on a 3 pt. hitch. It's especially important to me to have the links float when I'm using my tiller. I've been known to find a rock or two.
My Ford 2110 has just a floating link and I've never had an occasion to want anything different.
Lynn
 

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I just turned mine back to float running the flail the other weekend.
Been locked since I bought the tractor in 96ish..they were in float then & I locked them.

Not sure it ever matters I was mainly cutting roads/pads for years and wanted the BB to stay at the angle I set it at......rarely ever use it now.
 

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It looks like that change allows the links to move maybe about a half inch. Am I looking at that correctly?

On my 4066R, the 3pt hitch can move upwards anytime outside pressure is pushing it, so I am not sure whether this change is worthwhile. If I get into a dip with my brush hog, the 3pt hitch just moves upwards due to the pressure from the brush hog.

Dave
 

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It looks like that change allows the links to move maybe about a half inch. Am I looking at that correctly?

On my 4066R, the 3pt hitch can move upwards anytime outside pressure is pushing it, so I am not sure whether this change is worthwhile. If I get into a dip with my brush hog, the 3pt hitch just moves upwards due to the pressure from the brush hog.

Dave
That is true. But since both of your lower arms are rigidly connected to the rock shaft lift arms, and the lift arms are splined to each other on the rock shaft, whenever one lower arm raises up the other side must raise up the exact same amount. The arms are locked to each other.

What the other position on the lift arms does is allow the two lower arms to lift up independently by a small amount. That means a rear implement can twist a bit when going over uneven ground without putting a lot of stress on the rock shaft.

Does this make sense?
 
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That is true. But since both of your lower arms are rigidly connected to the rock shaft lift arms, and the lift arms are splined to each other on the rock shaft, whenever one lower arm raises up the other side must raise up the exact same amount. The arms are locked to each other.

What the other position on the lift arms does is allow the two lower arms to lift up independently by a small amount. That means a rear implement can twist a bit when going over uneven ground without putting a lot of stress on the rock shaft.

Does this make sense?
I had not thought about independent action.

Dave

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