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I'd say that was a decent price. I bought mine about this time last year for just a tad over $17.5 for just the tractor and the FEL with filled tires. Compared to my price you are getting the i-Match and JD BB5060 for about $300.
 
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That's a great price. Wish I'd found that nice of a deal last year!
 
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After back and forth with the dealer, do you think I’m getting a good deal?

2018 3025E with 300 FEL
JD I-Match
JD BB5060
Rim Guard in rear tires

$17,870

I went with the BB5060 over the BB2060 due to the extra ripping shank on the BB5060.
That's about what I paid this past December
 

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My local dealer wasn't letting go of one of these for less than 20K. That's a great price.
It is also a 2018 model. 2020's will be out in 6 months.

Jeff
 

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3025E vs 3032E or 3038E

that seems like a great price. so i have to ask, does the 3025E really have enough power? i currenty have a 2025R and its a little under powered for my needs. so i am upgrading to a 3038E. and what i am hearing is the 3025E really doesn't handle a 6ft snow blower that well. any truth to that?:usa
 

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that seems like a great price. so i have to ask, does the 3025E really have enough power? i currenty have a 2025R and its a little under powered for my needs. so i am upgrading to a 3038E. and what i am hearing is the 3025E really doesn't handle a 6ft snow blower that well. any truth to that?:usa
Well, rule of thumb is 5 PTO horsepower per foot of implement. So, a 3025e rated at 17.4 PTO horsepower, with a 6ft blower, is gonna be a bit much for it, in anything more than a lite dusting. I'd think even a 3038e, could potentially struggle some with a 6ft blower in heavier, deeper snow, when just going by the rule of thumb.

Edit; what does a 6ft snow blower weigh in at? It's gotta be pretty hefty.
 
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Well, rule of thumb is 5 PTO horsepower per foot of implement. So, a 3025e rated at 17.4 PTO horsepower, with a 6ft blower, is gonna be a bit much for it, in anything more than a lite dusting. I'd think even a 3038e, could potentially struggle some with a 6ft blower in heavier, deeper snow, when just going by the rule of thumb.

Edit; what does a 6ft snow blower weigh in at? It's gotta be pretty hefty.
The SB1174 rear 3 point snowblower from Frontier for Deere is 74" wide ( 6' 2") and it weighs about 650 pounds.

Since it's PTO horsepower, then whether its rear or Mid PTO for a front driven implement wouldn't matter. Since the 1025r is 18 PTO horsepower and the 1023e is 15.3 claimed PTO horsepower, then the Rule of Thumb doesn't wash for the 54" blowers sold for both machines. At 4.5 feet and 5 PTO horsepower per foot of implement, that would mean the machines would need 22.5 PTO horsepower.

The 1025r at 18 pto horsepwer is 4.5 PTO horsepower light on the PTO, which is 20% less than the rule.

The 1023e at 15.3 PTO horsepower would be 7.2 PTO HP light, which is 32% less than the rule.

Both the 1023e and the 1025r do just fine with the 54" snow blowers under most common snow conditions. Any machine is going to struggle when the snow is more slush than snow and the deeper the slush, the greater the struggle. Basically, an easy rule to follow is the easier the snow packs into a snowball, the harder it is to plow and blow. If it splatters when packed, its very tough to deal with because of the water content.

Same with temp conditions, conditions above 30 degrees have poorer traction and tougher snow moving conditions than temps below 20 degrees. The colder the temps when the snow is falling, the lighter the snow is to deal with. That's why when you have to get hit by a blizzard, its better to be below 20 degrees than near or above 30 degrees.

I have been told by the dealer that the 3025e can struggle with ground engaging implements such as roto tillers and box blades with scarifiers in heavy soil conditions.

The hydraulics on the 3025e have about 50% more pump volume and 20% more pressure than does the 1025r with the same engine horsepower and torque rating. The 3025e also weighs about 50% more with the FEL on the machine when compared to the 1025r equipped the same way.

No question, the 3025e is a lot of tractor for the money. Depending upon how the OP plans to use it will largely depend upon his / her / their satisfaction. It is a tractor which is quoted often by dealers for new customers and there are several owners of them here on GTT. From what I have heard from those who own it, many seem to be happy with their machines.

Machine operation is as much about the operator as it is the machine. We have some GTT members who have trouble with 12" of snow and others who deal with it so often they don't even think about it. No question, wet heavy snow is hard for any machine to move. Normal snowfalls shouldn't be an issue for a 6 foot rear snowblower. Just take it slow and steady. Don't expect to be rolling at full reverse speed with the 6 foot blower in anything other than light fluffy snow.
 
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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
that seems like a great price. so i have to ask, does the 3025E really have enough power? i currenty have a 2025R and its a little under powered for my needs. so i am upgrading to a 3038E. and what i am hearing is the 3025E really doesn't handle a 6ft snow blower that well. any truth to that?
Here is a video on YouTube, I believe he uses a 5ft snow plow.

https://youtu.be/PRRvuZWlfIw
 

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The SB1174 rear 3 point snowblower from Frontier for Deere is 74" wide ( 6' 2") and it weighs about 650 pounds.

Since it's PTO horsepower, then whether its rear or Mid PTO for a front driven implement wouldn't matter. Since the 1025r is 18 PTO horsepower and the 1023e is 15.3 claimed PTO horsepower, then the Rule of Thumb doesn't wash for the 54" blowers sold for both machines. At 4.5 feet and 5 PTO horsepower per foot of implement, that would mean the machines would need 22.5 PTO horsepower.

The 1025r at 18 pto horsepwer is 4.5 PTO horsepower light on the PTO, which is 20% less than the rule.

The 1023e at 15.3 PTO horsepower would be 7.2 PTO HP light, which is 32% less than the rule.

Both the 1023e and the 1025r do just fine with the 54" snow blowers under most common snow conditions. Any machine is going to struggle when the snow is more slush than snow and the deeper the slush, the greater the struggle. Basically, an easy rule to follow is the easier the snow packs into a snowball, the harder it is to plow and blow. If it splatters when packed, its very tough to deal with because of the water content.

Same with temp conditions, conditions above 30 degrees have poorer traction and tougher snow moving conditions than temps below 20 degrees. The colder the temps when the snow is falling, the lighter the snow is to deal with. That's why when you have to get hit by a blizzard, its better to be below 20 degrees than near or above 30 degrees.

I have been told by the dealer that the 3025e can struggle with ground engaging implements such as roto tillers and box blades with scarifiers in heavy soil conditions.

The hydraulics on the 3025e have about 50% more pump volume and 20% more pressure than does the 1025r with the same engine horsepower and torque rating. The 3025e also weighs about 50% more with the FEL on the machine when compared to the 1025r equipped the same way.

No question, the 3025e is a lot of tractor for the money. Depending upon how the OP plans to use it will largely depend upon his / her / their satisfaction. It is a tractor which is quoted often by dealers for new customers and there are several owners of them here on GTT. From what I have heard from those who own it, many seem to be happy with their machines.

Machine operation is as much about the operator as it is the machine. We have some GTT members who have trouble with 12" of snow and others who deal with it so often they don't even think about it. No question, wet heavy snow is hard for any machine to move. Normal snowfalls shouldn't be an issue for a 6 foot rear snowblower. Just take it slow and steady. Don't expect to be rolling at full reverse speed with the 6 foot blower in anything other than light fluffy snow.

It's just a generally recognized rule of thumb, to get by in pretty much any condition, easily. I've run a 60" rotary cutter on a 16 PTO HP Kubota. It lifted it fine, and cut short (<18") grass and weeds okay, albeit slowly. There was no way I was going to be able to use it in heavy tall and thick grass, or actual brush. I think most people can get by with 4 PTO HP per foot pretty easily.
I have no idea about Mid PTO vs Rear PTO and what they can and cannot do. Generally, a mid PTO operates at 3 to 4 times the speed of a rear PTO. How that equates to actual power where it's needed, I'm not really sure.

I thought a snow blower that large would weigh more then that. Interesting.
 
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that seems like a great price. so i have to ask, does the 3025E really have enough power? i currenty have a 2025R and its a little under powered for my needs. so i am upgrading to a 3038E. and what i am hearing is the 3025E really doesn't handle a 6ft snow blower that well. any truth to that?:usa
A tractor doesn't have enough power to run an implement when that implement cannot function with any degree of usefulness. For example, if you hook up a 64" snow blower (such as the one used with the 3025E in the video linked above) to a tractor and it stalls the engine when you engage a full load of snow with it, then that tractor doesn't have the power to run that implement.

Otherwise, "power" determines how fast you do work. A 3025E can run a 64" or even 74" blower...it will just have to go slow with the 64" and maybe very slow with the 74". A 74" blower might not be very useful (then again, it might, who knows until someone tries it), but as we saw in the vid, a 64" blower works just fine. So does it have enough power? Depends...how much of a hurry are you in? I wouldn't run a snow removal business with one, but for personal use, it's more than adequate.

I think the 3025E, particularly when you get it and the loader for around 18K, is the best bang for the buck when it comes to John Deere tractors. Nothing even comes close to its capability for the dollar. You'd have to go to a less popular/second tier brand to get more for your money.
 

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Lets "FIX" a few Myths.
The 1 series 25 hp , the 2 series 25hp, and the 3 series 25 hp are NOT the same engines. I have owned and run them all.
Each series 25 hp engine is a DIFFERENT Cubic Inch, with Much different TORQUE. The 3 series being Over 100 cubic inches.
They may "say" to the feds its 25 hp, and it could be at xx rpms, But the Engines get bigger, and so does the Torque.
 
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Lets "FIX" a few Myths.
The 1 series 25 hp , the 2 series 25hp, and the 3 series 25 hp are NOT the same engines. I have owned and run them all.
Each series 25 hp engine is a DIFFERENT Cubic Inch, with Much different TORQUE. The 3 series being Over 100 cubic inches.
They may "say" to the feds its 25 hp, and it could be at xx rpms, But the Engines get bigger, and so does the Torque.
The 3025E has a variation of the same engine used in the 2032R, 3032E and 3033R, which is the same engine used in several "35hp" tractors, such as the Yanmar YT235.
 
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that seems like a great price. so i have to ask, does the 3025E really have enough power? i currenty have a 2025R and its a little under powered for my needs. so i am upgrading to a 3038E. and what i am hearing is the 3025E really doesn't handle a 6ft snow blower that well. any truth to that?
I just purchased 3025E tractor/loader with Frontier 64" snow blower and it work great. It blew snow 2" deep several times, had to go slow when it was that deep but worked well and threw it 30ft away. I have a cabin in Tug Hill NY, we get over 300'' of snow! Yes, a larger motor would have helped but not needed. 64" exceeds tire width so it works well, 7" blower may be a little to much.
 

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It blew snow 2" deep several times, had to go slow when it was that deep but worked well and threw it 30ft away.
You probably mean 2'.

:)
 
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