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Discussion Starter #1
Our water line broke again.Our bill popped up double what it should be, this has happened in the past.

My Fil Quoted us $3200 to fix it. I got a quote from another local plumber for $2400. Would you go against the family to save the money?

Just curious. I could buy a really nice pistol for $800.00. What would the wife say, though?
 

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In the ground? How deep?
 

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I had to deal with this earlier this year, I was quoted $4.00 a foot to dig up the old line and replace with PVC. I have a 3,000' water line though, so I rented an excavator and did it myself. :laugh:

Brian makes a good point about materials. Is somebody putting in copper?
 

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I had to deal with this earlier this year, I was quoted $4.00 a foot to dig up the old line and replace with PVC. I have a 3,000' water line though, so I rented an excavator and did it myself. :laugh:

Brian makes a good point about materials. Is somebody putting in copper?
You guys are lucky you live in the tropics. I would jump on 4.00 per foot. I dug this water line out to my barn a couple of years ago. The pictures even don't do the trench justice. You can see a couple ground rods in the picture...they are 8 feet. The trench was pretty close to 9 feet deep and 8 feet wide by 600 feet long. I spent over $3000 just in sand to get a foot on top of the pipe and 6" below just cuz it's so rocky.
The pipe is 1 1/14 HDPE.
Hydrant.jpg
 

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I'd think about spending some extra money and put the water line in bigger pipe so I could change the water line if I needed to without a lot of digging.
 

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I'd think about spending some extra money and put the water line in bigger pipe so I could change the water line if I needed to without a lot of digging.
That thought did occur to me...for a few seconds:laugh: The 200 psi water line that I use has a 1/4 inch thick wall. It is so stiff, it would take a 12" pipe to install it into. That would be some serious cash. On top of that, you would not know where the pipe failed, and you would have to pull the whole pipe out, you would have to dick with all the hydrants.
I've never had a failure, cuz I get the line deep enough to where it won't freeze, and really go the extra mile back filling with sand. The failures that I've seen, is always a rock or freezing. Then you can see the wet spot, then just dig up the one spot and fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Our line is Polybutylene we've done three repairs in less than two years. Our enemies are tree roots.

I do have three estimates now.

$3200, that's a backhoe dug trench. 18" wide, bottom filled with gravel about a foot deep.
$2400, trencher dug trench. Unknown depth, but "deep enough not to freeze"
$800, + I rent the trencher. This is my neighbor's "guy"

We will probably go with the FIL, to keep sanity in the house. :( I'm hoping that this will get us more than the ~40 psi that we have now.
 

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I thought some of the plastics were about indestructible. What does the roots actually do to them?

Copper is terribly expensive. I have 300# of waterline in 3/4" copper. I think its close to $4.00 a foot now.

Wonder what it would cost to bore it? I got my water line bored for $500 but got a deal because they were here boring the Geo Thermal. Course up here we have to be almost 4' in the ground for frost ! I am sure where the hill is on one side of my creek my waterline is 25' deep. LOL. No fixing that.
 

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Our line is Polybutylene we've done three repairs in less than two years. Our enemies are tree roots.

I do have three estimates now.

$3200, that's a backhoe dug trench. 18" wide, bottom filled with gravel about a foot deep. $9.14/ft.
$2400, trencher dug trench. Unknown depth, but "deep enough not to freeze" $6.86/ft.
$800, + I rent the trencher. This is my neighbor's "guy" $2.29/ft.

We will probably go with the FIL, to keep sanity in the house. :( I'm hoping that this will get us more than the ~40 psi that we have now.
Not knowing your family dynamics, keeping peace can be priceless.

Do these prices include materials and labor to install the pipe. I'm guessing they do.

There are a lot of variables to consider.

Are you on well water or buy from a water department? Plastic and copper pipes have fairly low pressure drops due to their smooth interiors; so do you need a booster pump to get the PSI up, or does the water department have the PRV (Pressure Regulating Valve) turned down low. Are you pumping uphill or on the level? Besides pressure, what is your flow rate? All the pressure in the world is worthless if you don't have a decent flow rate. I'm guessing you are looking at a pipe size in the 3/4" - 1" range.

Soil type? Personally I like to put pipes, conduits, etc on top of a bed of pea gravel 3" - 6" deep followed by another 3" - 6" of pea gravel over the top of the pipe before I cover the pipe with spoils I dug out with the excavator.

A good backhoe or mini-ex operator can dig that much trench in a long day if nothing ugly is encountered. Most trenchers will do at least 3' deep. Walk-behind trenchers will beat the snot out of you with that much to dig.

After being a dummy by using 80 - 100 PSI rated poly-pipe for my irrigation system like everyone else does here; I swear if I ever do another irrigation system it will be with SCH 40 PVC. The cost is about the same as poly-pipe, fittings, and clamps; and PVC is stronger with better leak integrity at the joints. I hate any kind of plastic pipe on a roll as it's a pain in the ass to work with, especially alone. Unfortunately Type-K copper is too expensive for your application.
 

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mjncad, I thought PVC got brittle after a while?
 

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Our line is Polybutylene we've done three repairs in less than two years. Our enemies are tree roots.

I do have three estimates now.

$3200, that's a backhoe dug trench. 18" wide, bottom filled with gravel about a foot deep.
$2400, trencher dug trench. Unknown depth, but "deep enough not to freeze"
$800, + I rent the trencher. This is my neighbor's "guy"

We will probably go with the FIL, to keep sanity in the house. :( I'm hoping that this will get us more than the ~40 psi that we have now.
You'd be insane to use polybutylene again. Google polybutylene pipe, read the horror stories. HDPE is the standard around here for direct burial water lines. PEX is like HDPE on steroids.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks everyone. Don't worry, polybutylene won't be the replacement. Using a tape measure, my best (and my dad was a diesel fuel system engineer, so that pretty much makes this accurate) estimate is that it is an 8 foot rise over the 350 feet. When they built the house in '86, they ran the line, then did the final grade and poured the driveway. The first leak that I fixed was 8-10" deep, a root growing parallel to it pushed it up and cracked it. The second leak was 12" deep and there was a junction where a spigot was joined in, a root broke this one too. The third fix was another spigot junction. This one was incredibly fun. It was under the driveway. I'm not interested in having spigots down the driveway any more. My neighbors on either side of us say that they have 60+ psi and the county won't entertain requests for pressure issues when the leak detector is spinning like it is.

So, the end result is that we'll be keeping the money "in the family". It's just going to be easier that way.
 
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