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I'm sure this has been discussed ad nauseam, but the search button is not my friend.

I'm looking for opinions on 36" vs 42" forks, which is the best to have?

thanks
 

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it depends on your intended usage. I bought 42. Which is great for pallets and when I moved my truck bed. But it takes away lift capacity. If you properly load your pallets you can be fine but if improperly balanced you might create tip. 36 is great for most general lifting with the smaller machines and modest pallet moving but the 42s have come in handy for me before. Especially before I bought the load and go brackets for my 60d


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I'm sure this has been discussed ad nauseam, but the search button is not my friend.

I'm looking for opinions on 36" vs 42" forks, which is the best to have?

thanks
This is probably the most talked about subject on the forums. Why isn’t the search button your friend? Have you tried? There has to be at least 2 dozen threads on this exact subject. Asked and answered many many times.
 

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it depends on your intended usage. I bought 42. Which is great for pallets and when I moved my truck bed. But it takes away lift capacity. If you properly load your pallets you can be fine but if improperly balanced you might create tip. 36 is great for most general lifting with the smaller machines and modest pallet moving but the 42s have come in handy for me before. Especially before I bought the load and go brackets for my 60d
The difference in weight between a pair of standard taper 36x3-inch and 42x3-inch is only around 8 lbs (112 lbs. vs 120 lbs.). Just because you have longer fork tines doesn't mean you have to keep your pallet out at the end.

Longer tines are somewhat easier to see the tips from the operator's seat. It can also be easier to grab a pallet that is pushed forward on a truck or trailer. Once you have the pallet on the tines you always want to slide the load up against the back stop anyway so in reality there isn't much disadvantage to the longer tines.
 

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I debated 36 vs 42...opted for the longer forks. After many hours of use, 42 inches was a good call - much more convenient length. 36 would have been too short for the stuff I'm lifting/scooping/carrying, reaching.
 

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I went with the 42" tines and have not regretted my decision.
 

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It's a personal decision. Longer means you can handle more things like logs and branches per load (maybe) and maybe occasionally reach something 6" further away or place a pallet a little further into a truck bed (for instance).

However, you're adding 6" more steel so they weigh more which means you have less lift capacity for your loads and they further away from your pivot point, the less you can lift as well. That said, you can my signature for what I bought/own.

But seriously, use the search function..you'll have lots of reading on what size and what brand to buy.
 

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I have 36 x 3 on my 1025R. 36" forks work with most standard sized pallets. They work best in my situation because many if not most of my loads are stored on shelving or up against a wall. Lift capacity is greater when your pallet is against the backrest. I can place heavily loaded pallets 6" closer to the wall.

It's hard to see the tips of 36" forks from the drivers seat, but I'm used to it now.

Everyone's situation is different. You need to decide what is more important to you and what you are mostly going to use them for. No matter what size you get, their usages are endless. :thumbup1gif:
 

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I went with the 42" tines and have not regretted my decision.
I opted for 36" tines and have wished I had gotten longer tines on a few occasions. :nunu:


To the OP, just simply type "pallet forks" in the search bar and have a ball.
 

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I have the 42”. I’m happy with them, particularly happy that I can see the tips. The only detriment is that when dumping, they are so long that sometimes I have trouble tilting them enough. But I always get the job done.


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I'm happy with my 36 inch tines. If they were six inches longer, I couldn't get behind the tractor when it's parked in its space. I haven't seen any limitations in lifting anything. I am looking to take the topper off my truck using the forks, and I'm designing and fabricating extenders for just this purpose. I always figured that if I ended up needing longer tines, I'd just buy a second set. Or you can buy commercial extenders.
 

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We have a set of 42" forks on our JD AP 10 frame.

Kind of like said, the 42" forks would be much more versatile on a bigger reach loader. Like anything, there is a learning curve to getting the most use from them, regardless of loader size.

They are more than adequate for our needs on our tractor loader.
 

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I had the same question initially, and even looked at 48". It didn't seem to matter for most of the things I wanted to do. The exception was getting to a second pallet in my 5x8 utility trailer. With the 42" tines I can catch the forward pallet and drag it towards the rear where I can lift it properly. The 36" tines wouldn't reach it and I would have to do something manually to move it.

I have found another plus for the longer tines since I got them. I have been digging rocks with the forks and can get more leverage prying them out of a hole. I still use the backhoe if I have to clear around the bigger rocks. If I had a bigger loader I would seriously consider the 48" tines just for the rocks.
 

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I am thinking of putting a spacer/lock between the forks at the bottom for their closest setting. I set them closer for digging and moving rocks, but it is right at the cutaway where you remove the forks, and they sometimes come loose on the bottom. It could be something as simple as a piece of wood for that spacing between the forks held in place with a strap.
 
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