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The old 4010 got some exercise today, along with 4 bottom plow which hasn't been in the ground in a few years. We decided to turn over one of our older alfalfa fields today. The alfalfa was getting preaty thin. Will disk and plant oats for cover crop over the winter, then replant next summer.
 

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Thanks for posting, it brings back memories of driving our neighbor's new 4010 when I was a kid helping him with fall plowing. He pulled a 5 bottom semi-mount plow behind his. He didn't have front weights on the 4010 so if we got into really heavy soil the front tires would float lightly and we had to steer with the brakes. Enjoy your time on that 4010.
 

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That's some good looking dirt. Mine is more sand/gravel
 

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That's some good looking dirt. Mine is more sand/gravel
was that where the silo was at?? are u spreading the dirt with old yeller!!!!:lol::lolol:just kidding!!:munch:
 

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was that where the silo was at?? are u spreading the dirt with old yeller!!!!:lol::lolol:just kidding!!:munch:

Yes, old silo is just out of the picture to the left. No, old yeller just took me there.
Bring the dozer and smooth things out for me.
 

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Dad bought a '63 4010-D in December '68, already had the 4020 Kit in the engine, shift linkage still tight. Still had the factory installed 15.5x38 Good Years on the back with 50-60% tread, hole in the drawbar still round. Tractor burned 4-5 QUARTS of oil every tank of fuel plowing. Dad traded a really nice JI Case 4-14 plow off for a 5-14 JI Case plow, widened out our Midwest plow harrow and then got tired of plowing in 2nd & 3rd gear, so pulled the back bottom off the big plow and made it 4-14's.

Tractor looked decent for being 5 years old, but by the time we took it to the field in April '69 it looked brand new, had all four new tires, new paint, and a good tune-up. There were many break-downs, some fixed in the yard or our shop, most happened in the field! Tie rod ends falling apart, water pump leaking, starter, generator, and voltage regulator all needing rebuilt/replaced, gotta love those expensive 24 V electrical systems. We caught the leaking seals on the draft sensing bar after it only leaked a couple gallons of oil, not all of it! Tractor NEVER had a loader on it, ever, Dad bought the guy's matching 4-row front mount cultivator with the tractor. Thing didn't turn near tight enough to cultivate four 38" rows, turn on the eight endrows and take the next four rows back, had to skip four. The bolt-on rear PTO stub shaft was a disaster waiting to happen. If it loosened, which it did constantly, it would allow the PTO speed change gears to crash, requiring an expensive double split right behind the engine clutch. Dad checked the four 3/8" capscrews every load when combining with the #30. The PTO clutch finally failed running our 6 ft bush hog trimming grass/weeds in August '72 before the farm we lived on sold at auction.

The tractor was decent to cultivate with, once you resigned yourself to skipping rows and wasting time on the headlands. Getting on/off the tractor with the cultivator on was best done on the RIGHT side. A 2" pipe ran from the rear rockshaft for the 3-point to the left side of the cultivator about 3-4 inches above the platform. I almost did a face plant into the cultivator getting off one day. I'd get on the tractor on the left side after that but never got off the platform on the left after that.

Plowing quarter mile rows the steering spinner and steering wheel would move counter-clockwise about a half a turn, 180 degrees, full turn per round. The other farm, 80 acres, was half mile rows, two full turns per round. Ohhh, and the power brakes were grabby, you had to push the pedals kinda hard to get brakes, then they'd grab, slide the wheel and seem like they'd take forever to release.

First thing I did every time I got on the thing was to engage the PTO, to get that stupid lever away from me as I got on/off the tractor afterwards. I'm sure my folks appreciated their grandson, not sure they would have had grandkids if I hadn't done that!

The tractor did all the fieldwork, 140-150 acres of plowing & disking, and cultivating. Pulled a JD #30 combine over 30-40 acres of oats every year. Tractor sat from July till April every year unless we had time for some fall plowing. Other tractors ran the feed grinder, mowed/raked hay, did chores like running the 5-6 miles to town for hog feed, hauling water to hog lots, hauling manure, and everything else. The less we ran the 4010 the less we had to work on it and spend on parts. We put 250 hours a year per the tach/hour meter on the Super H FARMALL, it planted, sprayed, did road work, mowed/raked, even baled hay occasionally; about 200-220 hrs. per year on the '51 M FARMALL, the chore/loader/picker tractor. 4010 got maybe 125 hours per year more or less.

Third year Dad had it he got tired of only being able to pull our 12 ft disk a half a mile per hour faster than Our 55 HP 450 FARMALL we had the 4 years before the 4010. He had a different pump guy come over one night and rebuild the injection pump. The first guy that worked on it in January '69 was grossly overrated, never put the tractor on a dyno to check his work. Tractor was only making 65-70 PTO HP! After second guy was done we did a road test! Dad had the guy set the pump for 100-105 HP, 12 ft disk sunk in to the hubs and 2200 rpm in 7th gear! Dirt was flying, Was rolling a little smoke, and fire too pulling the hills! We ran that tractor that way disking in 5 th gear ahead of the planter, cultivating, and combining, and blew the head gasket about 15-20 acres before we were done fall plowing that year. Engine got a major overhaul that winter, M&W sleeves & pistons, head totally rebuilt, new main & rod bearings, conn rods reconditioned, new water pump again, injection pump returned to stock. Guy at the shop had the son of a guy Dad went to high school with interested in buying the tractor. It got an M&W turbo installed, a new engine clutch and PTO clutch installed and went home with the young man. About a year later he came over to talk to Dad, Dad & I were gone somewhere. Guess the transmission or final drives, maybe both failed and the guy wanted to know how much of the repairs Dad was going to pay for! We had dumped enough time and money into that tractor trying to keep it running in just 4 months shy of four years, Dad explained what "As Is, Where Is" meant and that was the end of it. I suspect that tractor got recycled, shipped the China and made in staples or paper clips!

One day in about 1969 or '70 Dad & I were walking across the barnyard to the house after evening chores after spending most or all of the day wrenching on the 4010 instead of doing something profitable and Dad said,"I like to keep one of those ¥℅π×∆£ Things around to remind me to NOT buy another one!"
 

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Powerstroke you sure must have got a lemon. This one's never had an overhaul or major repair in it's entire life and was the main tractor for many years on the farm. My neighbor has one as well his dad bought new and has been a great tractor. He keeps saying he wants to be buried with that tractor. I guess the old saying is true you can't kill a good one and you can't fix a bad one.
 

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Powerstroke you sure must have got a lemon. This one's never had an overhaul or major repair in it's entire life and was the main tractor for many years on the farm. My neighbor has one as well his dad bought new and has been a great tractor. He keeps saying he wants to be buried with that tractor. I guess the old saying is true you can't kill a good one and you can't fix a bad one.
Ditto. Had very little problems with the 4010. We did have to split the tractor two years ago to fix pto shift collar, but other than that had very little problems. Hay work is mainly its life now days.
 

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Powerstroke you sure must have got a lemon. This one's never had an overhaul or major repair in it's entire life and was the main tractor for many years on the farm. My neighbor has one as well his dad bought new and has been a great tractor. He keeps saying he wants to be buried with that tractor. I guess the old saying is true you can't kill a good one and you can't fix a bad one.
DITTO. 3010/4010 had hyd leak problems but I don't remember any other major failures and I was employed at a JD dealership back then.

On 4 bolts coming loose on pto stub shaft I sure thought Loc-tite was available back in '68 or one could have drilled bolt heads and secured with a "tie wire". 460's were the beginning of IHC's demise. I cured the pto shift failures when they happened by converting pto to 540 only speed!
 

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Good lock washer on pto stub and never had a problem. A lot of pto work with ours as like I said hay work is its life so when it is being used we are using pto. Had to rebuild rear outlets due to leak last year.
 

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DITTO. 3010/4010 had hyd leak problems but I don't remember any other major failures and I was employed at a JD dealership back then.

On 4 bolts coming loose on pto stub shaft I sure thought Loc-tite was available back in '68 or one could have drilled bolt heads and secured with a "tie wire". 460's were the beginning of IHC's demise. I cured the pto shift failures when they happened by converting pto to 540 only speed!
Jim if you don't mind my asking what was your opinion at the time of the new gen tractors when they came out. It was before my time and was curious. I read they kept it all super secret even from the dealers until they were released at a big event in Texas. Did they just throw them at the dealers to sell without warning or did they have to retrain all the mechanics that were used to the 2 cylinders. Were the customers really screaming for a new tractor from JD. I've read that JD was second to IH at that time until the new gens came out and blew everyone away. Admittedly IH hurt themselves as well. I know what my dads opinion was. He was mixed on them. He loved the 4010 but ended up trading a 730 diesel for a 3020 gas and hated it with a passion. JD was always out trying to get it running. I could start a new thread on everything my dad would say about that 3020. Most of what he said I don't think I had better repeat though.
 

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I was too young to know your answer. I was 16 at the time the New Gen's were introduced. I actually attended the debut in Dallas. I still remember seeing the tractor that I think was a 4010 spinning around under spotlights on a turntable at the Dallas State fair grounds pavilion. Yes JD keep it a secret. My brother was a JD dealer('53-'88) for whom I later was employed('66-'87). JD Waterloo gasoline powered engines have always left a lot to be desired especially compared to their Dubuque gasoline powered counterparts and other makes of tractor gasoline engines.
 

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I was 15 at the time. My Dad, who was the dealer, attended "Deere Day in Dallas". There is a video someplace that I will try to find and put on here. It was an exciting time. I received my red to green blood transfusion in 1953 when my first became a dealer, so whatever John Deere did was great as far as I was concerned. There was an article in "The Plowshare" a while back about the preparations for the event in Dallas.

Here is one video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iVQoz58mh7I

Here is "The Plowshare" link: https://www.deere.com/en_US/docs/Corporate/fans_visitors/publications/plowshare_issue14.pdf

Another from Plowshare: https://www.deere.com/en_US/docs/Corporate/fans_visitors/publications/plowshare_issue20.pdf

There's more to this story, but it will have to wait until after supper.
 

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I was too young to know your answer. I was 16 at the time the New Gen's were introduced. I actually attended the debut in Dallas. I still remember seeing the tractor that I think was a 4010 spinning around under spotlights on a turntable at the Dallas State fair grounds pavilion. Yes JD keep it a secret. My brother was a JD dealer('53-'88) for whom I later was employed('66-'87). JD Waterloo gasoline powered engines have always left a lot to be desired especially compared to their Dubuque gasoline powered counterparts and other makes of tractor gasoline engines.
That would sure have been something to see. I have a book around here just about the new Gen tractors and the debut in Dallas. I would have to dig it out but it told how many tons of food alone that JD served.
 

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Yes, old silo is just out of the picture to the left. No, old yeller just took me there.
Bring the dozer and smooth things out for me.
ha!! u rent oone and i'll drive out to run it for u-ok!:lol: :munch:

DROBINSON-thanks for the video--if i had known about this say about last yr, i could of asked the nephew of our local jd dealer. but he passed away at 94 this spring. i'm sure his uncle was in Dallas back then too. thanks big jim
 

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People always say the 460/560 FARMALL were so bad, but there is still a huge number of them still being used on farms today. The rear end bearing issue was a very localized problem. Was most prevalent in cotton country where middle-busting, a type of ridging tillage operation using a front mounted cultivator with only one big sweep where a row crop, corn/bean cultivator would have 4-5 sweeps. The rear tires ran in the bottom of the furrow and had perfect traction, no slippage, which any power train designer/engineer will agree is death to the drive train.

Neighbor across the road farmed 240 acres with a 560 gas, two 8N Fords that seldom left the shed, and a FARMALL Cub to mow his lawn. That 560 plowed, disked, planted, cultivated, and would have gone under the corn picker except he had a brand new IH 203 combine. The one year he had40 acres of hay he mowed hay with the 560. I think he did rake hay with one of the 8N's.

The second year the guy bought 80 acres Dad and the neighbor had farmed a couple years so he farmed a whole half section with one tractor and no hired help plus had a part time job in town. So that 560 did all the work on 320 acres for 4-5 years. Guy pulled the same 4-14 plow we did, same 12 ft disk. The last year he farmed he bought a W-9 IH to do part of the field work.

Guy that posts frequently on other forums I post or lurk at was an IH service tech starting in the late 1950's. He's done over 100 of the recalls on 460/560's. He also worked at a Deere dealer for several years before retiring. You guys who haven't had problem's with 4010's are the lucky ones! The BS we went thru with our 4010 sounds more like normal stuff! My Cousin had a '64 or '65 4020-D, Synchro-Range, he had already rebuilt the shifting linkage under the dash by 1970/'71. Lots of new parts and $$$$ . Still found many neutrals not shown on the dash decal! At least Deere fixed the PTO on the 3020/4020. Dad had grade 8 capscrews on his 4010, matching flat washers & lockwashers. If LockTight had been around I'm sure he'd have had some! Wikipedia says it was created in 1953, patented in 1960. Yes, safety wire would have been a more positive means to lock those four capscrews, but Dad didn't really have the tools to drill grade 8 bolts for safety wire. He could have tack welded the heads on the stub shaft in a heartbeat!

The BTO I worked for had a pair of 4020-D's. think they were '64/'65's. WFE with aftermarket cab/heater, other was nfe open station. The nfe tractor normally ran warm in the field but was trouble-free. WFE was normally trouble-free but shelled out hyd pump drive coupling right in the middle of corn planting in '68 or '69. The tractor had around 3000 hours, closest it ever got to a loader was parking in the shed next to the Case Construction King. Following year both tractors traded off for side console nfe open station and wfe 4320 with ROPS cab & a/c. The 4320 had been delivered in late morning, hooked to the F-145 5-14 plow and sat till I got there after school that afternoon. Tractor had 3 hours on the clock. Had almost ten when I parked it that night! I always liked that tractor! Was exactly what the 4020 should have been.

Neighbor Dad traded help with and rented 80 acres with got the first 4020-D side console. Late fall of '68. I ran it a couple hours chopping corn stalks with a 6 ft BushHog. Think it had 5-6 hours on it by then. That first winter it got a Year-A-Round cab, second winter it got an M&W turbo and a MUFFLER! Guys around home plowed in 5th gear....or else! If you had hills they were clay and a stock 4020 wouldn't cut it. Even the new neighbor across the road with his two part-time 4020 pulling tractors plowed in 5th gear with their 6-16 plow! On the clay hills they only plowed 3-4 inches deep! I measured! Transmission & rear end wouldn't survive the 175-200 HP in 4th gear, had to run 5th. They used a huge dry type air filter bolted to the tractor frame, 5-6" tubing running around to plumb the air, big hole cut in the hood for huge turbo to stick out of.
 

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Well I think we figured out why you don't like the 4010-20's. They were abused and didn't hold up. I don't care what color tractor you have if you have to run it hard enough to the point you had to add a turbo to it you gonna get what you deserve. You needed bigger tractors and now are complaining about one's to small to do the job not holding up.
 

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People always say the 460/560 FARMALL were so bad, but there is still a huge number of them still being used on farms today. The rear end bearing issue was a very localized problem. Was most prevalent in cotton country where middle-busting, a type of ridging tillage operation using a front mounted cultivator with only one big sweep where a row crop, corn/bean cultivator would have 4-5 sweeps. The rear tires ran in the bottom of the furrow and had perfect traction, no slippage, which any power train designer/engineer will agree is death to the drive train.

Neighbor across the road farmed 240 acres with a 560 gas, two 8N Fords that seldom left the shed, and a FARMALL Cub to mow his lawn. That 560 plowed, disked, planted, cultivated, and would have gone under the corn picker except he had a brand new IH 203 combine. The one year he had40 acres of hay he mowed hay with the 560. I think he did rake hay with one of the 8N's.

The second year the guy bought 80 acres Dad and the neighbor had farmed a couple years so he farmed a whole half section with one tractor and no hired help plus had a part time job in town. So that 560 did all the work on 320 acres for 4-5 years. Guy pulled the same 4-14 plow we did, same 12 ft disk. The last year he farmed he bought a W-9 IH to do part of the field work.

Guy that posts frequently on other forums I post or lurk at was an IH service tech starting in the late 1950's. He's done over 100 of the recalls on 460/560's. He also worked at a Deere dealer for several years before retiring. You guys who haven't had problem's with 4010's are the lucky ones! The BS we went thru with our 4010 sounds more like normal stuff! My Cousin had a '64 or '65 4020-D, Synchro-Range, he had already rebuilt the shifting linkage under the dash by 1970/'71. Lots of new parts and $$$$ . Still found many neutrals not shown on the dash decal! At least Deere fixed the PTO on the 3020/4020. Dad had grade 8 capscrews on his 4010, matching flat washers & lockwashers. If LockTight had been around I'm sure he'd have had some! Wikipedia says it was created in 1953, patented in 1960. Yes, safety wire would have been a more positive means to lock those four capscrews, but Dad didn't really have the tools to drill grade 8 bolts for safety wire. He could have tack welded the heads on the stub shaft in a heartbeat!

The BTO I worked for had a pair of 4020-D's. think they were '64/'65's. WFE with aftermarket cab/heater, other was nfe open station. The nfe tractor normally ran warm in the field but was trouble-free. WFE was normally trouble-free but shelled out hyd pump drive coupling right in the middle of corn planting in '68 or '69. The tractor had around 3000 hours, closest it ever got to a loader was parking in the shed next to the Case Construction King. Following year both tractors traded off for side console nfe open station and wfe 4320 with ROPS cab & a/c. The 4320 had been delivered in late morning, hooked to the F-145 5-14 plow and sat till I got there after school that afternoon. Tractor had 3 hours on the clock. Had almost ten when I parked it that night! I always liked that tractor! Was exactly what the 4020 should have been.

Neighbor Dad traded help with and rented 80 acres with got the first 4020-D side console. Late fall of '68. I ran it a couple hours chopping corn stalks with a 6 ft BushHog. Think it had 5-6 hours on it by then. That first winter it got a Year-A-Round cab, second winter it got an M&W turbo and a MUFFLER! Guys around home plowed in 5th gear....or else! If you had hills they were clay and a stock 4020 wouldn't cut it. Even the new neighbor across the road with his two part-time 4020 pulling tractors plowed in 5th gear with their 6-16 plow! On the clay hills they only plowed 3-4 inches deep! I measured! Transmission & rear end wouldn't survive the 175-200 HP in 4th gear, had to run 5th. They used a huge dry type air filter bolted to the tractor frame, 5-6" tubing running around to plumb the air, big hole cut in the hood for huge turbo to stick out of.
REALLY!!!!!!!!!!!! I guess that's why IHC 460/560 bring more $$$$$ today than their Green counterparts because they're so much better than 4010/4020's. YEA in your dreams maybe.
 

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In late 60s and 70s farmed 700 acres part time with a couple of Oliver's, but had an early 4020 for 3-4 years. It was a power shift and had an aftermarket turbo. Pulled 6-16 in 4th-5th gear. Had to keep 800 lb on front to make it half-way safe. Way too much power for the weight, however never had the first repair or downtime. Neighbor today has a 66 3020 diesel her dad bought new. Has over 16000 hours on it and still doing chores daily. Guess some are bullet-proof.


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